Upcoming2018-12-14T02:29:10+00:00

Upcoming Webinars

Evidenced-based Strategies for Implementing Critical Learner Reflection

At one point or another in our learning journeys, we have probably all been asked to reflect on our learning experiences. Although educators across disciplines have long recognized reflection’s importance and applicability across a wide variety of educational settings, it nonetheless remains a challenging concept for educators to firmly grasp in practice. Many instructors who try to integrate learner reflection into their teaching face the following question or similar conundrum: How do I foster learners’ ability to engage in reflection that goes beyond their simple description of what I or they did in class? This webinar helps you break the cycle of non-transformative reflection that educators often encounter. You’ll become familiar with (a) what learner reflection entails, (b) why learner reflection is critically important according to research, and (c) how to implement reflection in ways that help learners reap its benefits and become autonomous learners.

Li-Shih Huang, Associate Professor, Applied Linguistics and LT Scholar-in-Residence, University of Victoria Li-Shih Huang completed her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the University of Victoria in 2006, she was a full-time faculty member at the School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto. Her academic training encompasses specialized study of organizational psychology, international business and marketing, education, and applied linguistics. Currently, she is an associate professor of applied linguistics at the University of Victoria. Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, Li-Shih spent over six years in management positions with multinational corporations. Her creativity in designing pedagogical materials has been recognized by the largest international professional association in the field, TESOL, which awarded her the Mary Finocchiaro Award for Excellence in the Development of Pedagogical Materials. She is also the recipient of the 2014 Humanities Teaching Excellence Award and the 2017 TESOL Award for an Outstanding Paper on NNEST Issues.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Can Science Survive Without the Humanities? A Forgotten Creative Reciprocity!

In modern curriculum, there has been a gradual disengagement of the arts from the sciences. Standard language has changed from the arts and sciences to the arts or sciences. During our webinar, we demonstrate that there is a forgotten reciprocity between the sciences and the humanities that can and should be revived. We also discuss how the study of the humanities and social sciences is vital to imaginative, inventive, and innovative thought, particularly in the biologic and physical sciences. We have developed and will review what we call the “Inspirational Six Process” (The i6), a method made up of six areas in order to inspire innate curiosity for a new, creative way of thinking: Animate, Originate, Rejuvenate, Stimulate, Deus Ex Machina, and Tell the Story.

Stewart BarrPhilosophy, Humanities, and Linguistics, Pima Community College (retired)
Stewart Barr’s unique “Mephistophelian” style of teaching attracted hundreds of students with the desire to not simply learn, but to think differently during his 35-plus years in higher education. He was faculty in and chair of the humanities, philosophy, religion, and speech departments at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. He has been awarded Best of Pima, Outstanding Faculty, and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty of the Year at Pima Community College. In 2006 he was invited to present at the Oxford Roundtable on Religion and the State. He has also worked across the curricula to develop interdisciplinary courses, including Bio-Medical Ethics in Biology, Philosophy of Law for Business, and the Philosophical Foundations of Science for Physics. He has a B.A. in Philosophy with a minor in Comparative Religion, an M.A. in Oriental Studies with a minor in Linguistics, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy. 

Anthony PituccoPhysics, Mathematics, and Logic, Pima Community College (retired)

Anthony (Tony) Pitucco is best known as the creative educator who injected comedy and playful, over-dramatized acting into his physics lectures at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Tony has been actively involved in higher education for over 40 years. He was faculty in and chair of the physics and astronomy departments at Pima Community College where he also taught mathematics, philosophy, and humanities. Tony holds several awards, including The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Science Arizona Professor of the Year, The Dr. Wayne McGrath Outstanding Faculty Award, and the Pima Community College Outstanding Faculty Award. Tony has also authored articles that have appeared in various academic journals and NISOD’s Innovation Abstracts, as well as co-authored a children’s textbook titled, The Restaurant at the Beginning of the Universe. Tony holds a B.S. in Physics, a M.Ed. in Philosophy and Foundations of Education, a M.S. in Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics in the area of mathematical physics. 

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Practical Strategies for Supporting English-as-an-Additional-Language Students

This webinar considers pedagogical challenges from the perspective of learners of English-as-an-additional-language (EAL). In particular, it illustrates the salient linguistic features of a chosen source language, in this case Chinese, as an example of the potential communication challenges faced by students in order to help raise your awareness about students’ communication preferences. The Dr. Huang explores practical strategies informed by teaching, research, and practice for supporting international EAL students with the goal of correcting commonly held misperceptions that may undermine learning and outcomes. You’ll develop greater awareness of linguistic preferences while having common misperceptions corrected and learning evidence-based strategies for supporting EAL students.

Li-Shih Huang, Associate Professor, Applied Linguistics and LT Scholar-in-Residence, University of Victoria
Li-Shih Huang completed her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the University of Victoria in 2006, she was a full-time faculty member at the School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto. Her academic training encompasses specialized study of organizational psychology, international business and marketing, education, and applied linguistics. Currently, she is an associate professor of applied linguistics at the University of Victoria. Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, Li-Shih spent over six years in management positions with multinational corporations. Her creativity in designing pedagogical materials has been recognized by the largest international professional association in the field, TESOL, which awarded her the Mary Finocchiaro Award for Excellence in the Development of Pedagogical Materials. She is also the recipient of the 2014 Humanities Teaching Excellence Award and the 2017 TESOL Award for an Outstanding Paper on NNEST Issues.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Informational Webinar: NISOD 101: PPWCC Award

NISOD and Diverse: Issues in Higher Education are proud to announce the 5th annual Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges (PPWCC) award. This complimentary webinar covers information about the award and survey administered by Do Good Work Educational Consulting. Questions regarding eligibility and the guidelines will be answered. Register for the webinar today to hear more about this amazing opportunity to promote your institution’s exceptional commitment to diversity!

Ralph NewellVP of Business Development and Technology, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

This webinar is free for members and non-members to attend.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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The Office Hours Initiative (OHI): Outreach, Support, and Success

Office hours at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College (North Carolina) recently became an issue. Although some faculty members were not available during their advertised hours, many were available, yet students did not visit. While factors influencing students’ decisions to use office hours are largely beyond instructors’ control, instructors can play a role in encouraging students to take advantage of office hours (Weimer, 2015). The lack of students utilizing office hours at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College led to the creation of the Office Hour Initiative (OHI). By integrating digital platforms and resources and establishing new office hours expectations for English and math faculty (the two groups piloting the initiative), the OHI provides for office hours available at times “reasonable for faculty and students.” The flexibility and convenience of the new office hours allow students to meet with their instructors from home and avoid the costs associated with transportation, childcare, and hours of missed work. Since going digital, Dr. Billings and her colleagues at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College have seen huge improvements in student success, including increased retention. By learning about the OHI, it is our hope that others will consider implementing a similar model at their institutions.

Dr. Jenny Billings is the Chair of Study Skills and English at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College’s Concord and Salisbury campuses and oversees the Office Hour Initiative (OHI) and Paideia Instruction. She is also a Faculty Partner for Cengage. Dr. Billings has taught English Composition, Developmental English, college student success, and all levels of developmental reading and English through course, curriculum, and master shell development. She helped roll out one of the first and largest all-inclusive e-Text initiatives at her institution in the fall of 2014. Through that project, Dr. Billings gained experience with a number of digital learning platforms and now shares her knowledge by training colleagues to become experts as well.

Melissa Reid is the Chair of Mathematics at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College’s Concord and Salisbury campuses in North Carolina. Ms. Reid is also a Calculus, PreCalculus, and Developmental Math instructor. She is an Advisory Board Member for NC State’s Transfer Admissions. While at the Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, Ms. Reid has served as a Master Faculty Advisor, a Grant Coordinator, a full-time instructor, and a Coordinator for Pearson’s MyLabsPlus. She is also an OHI partner for the college.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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The Known Unknowns: Some Best Practices for Onboarding and Training New Full-Time Faculty

Each year, community college administrators and Human Resources departments are busy hiring new full-time faculty members. These new faculty members then experience the transition from their previous place of employment, whether from an academic institution or industry, to their new campus home. In order to make this transition easier and enable each faculty member to learn a new set of policies, procedures, and best practices, colleges should provide a comprehensive onboarding and learning experience. Attend this webinar to learn about the structure of one college’s model to help new faculty grow and flourish from the moment they step on campus as “freshman” in a new environment.

Sean J. Glassberg, Director, Faculty Development, Horry Georgetown Technical College (HGTC) in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, has nearly 25 years of academic and professional experience, ranging from teaching English at community colleges and universities to training industry and technical professionals to become educators. In 2003, he developed the first iteration of a New Faculty Orientation program at HGTC. Over the years, through constant evaluation and new faculty surveys, this program has evolved into a comprehensive course required of all new full-time faculty hires at the college. The course consists of class meetings, assignments, quizzes, webinars, an online resource center, and guest facilitators, all of which enable faculty to immerse themselves in an environment where they can learn about teaching at their new academic home. Sean enjoys sharing what he does and learning what others do to help new faculty at their own colleges.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Register Now