Webinar banner

NISOD schedules a series of year-round, high-quality, and thought-provoking webinars. Led by community and technical college leaders and other experts in the field, NISOD webinars enable faculty members to conveniently learn about best practices and cutting-edge research related to effective teaching. Each webinar, a free benefit for NISOD-member colleges, includes timely, learning-focused, and action-oriented objectives that will help faculty members improve their teaching techniques for online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face courses. The combination of powerful expertise and interactive technology promises to bring new life to professional development on campuses around the world.

Webinar FAQs
Facilitate a Webinar
Webinar Archives

Upcoming Webinars

America's Missing Piece: Understanding and Teaching DEI's Generational Module

Within each generation – Gen Z, Millennials, and Gen X – there are many demographics, including women, minorities, and white men. Three generations of faculty and students exist within college classrooms. Each generation, and the different demographics within that generation, have profoundly different experiences with diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education. Learning about DEI is no longer optional. Given the stunning intolerance that exists in America, educators must understand the differences between generations and demographics to reduce the nightmare of systemic anger, violence, and hatred. Understanding DEI through the unique generational lens is key to better preparing students for the multi-ethnic and multi-generational dynamics they face every hour of every day in their careers, and it is essential knowledge in every classroom.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn to recognize the profoundly diverse lifestyles and core values of each generation.
  2. Participants learn to recognize the profoundly diverse experiences that individuals of different demographics have within each generation.
  3. Participants leave the webinar able to weave generation-specific DEI content into their pedagogy and classroom culture to better prepare students for the workforce. This is "the missing piece."

Chuck Underwood is one of the Lightning-Bolt Six: The half-dozen visionary scholars who pioneered and then popularized the discipline of generational studies. He provides consulting, research, and training to American businesses, government officials, educators, and religious leaders on generational strategies. His higher education clients include the American Council on Education, the Council for the Advancement and Support of Higher Education, the Association of Community College Trustees, the League for Innovation in the Community College, and dozens of individual institutions from coast to coast. He is the creator and host of the PBS national-television series America’s Generations With Chuck Underwood, the first such series about the generations in the history of national television. His 800-page book, America’s Generations in the Workplace, Marketplace, and Living Room, is considered the most comprehensive "bible" of generational strategies ever published.

Monday, September 20, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Shutdowns, Snowballs, and Sages

This session asks the question, “What do shutdowns, snowballs and sages have in common?” The answer may surprise you as all three have to do with different aspects of financial health. Join us to learn why the path to financial health is at least partially paved with shutdowns, snowballs, and sages.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Computational Literacy for Modern Careers

In an increasingly automated world, many people assume that working with computers, robots, CNC machines, and such is far too complicated and simply out of question. NCLab's training program "Computational Literacy for Modern Careers" can prepare your students to be more successful in modern careers. NCLab partners with colleges to provide training in Computational Literacy, Data Analytics, Python Development, and related areas. Come see how our self-paced training method combines bite-sized tutorials with hands-on practice to make your students job-ready.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn about NCLab’s new training program, Computational Literacy for Modern Careers, which is a timely addition to existing online offerings at community colleges.
  2. Participants learn how NCLab’s signature method of instructor-assisted learning-by-doing differs from MOOCs and bootcamps, and why it leads to almost 100 percent student completion.
  3. Participants gain practical experience with NCLab’s hands-on, interactive Computational Aptitude Assessment that helps applicants determine if they are a good fit for the program.

Leonard Lafrance has built and run a 250-person software company, mentored dozens of northern Nevada startups, invested in northern Nevada's entrepreneurial ecosystem, and is now changing the way the world learns with NCLab.

Dr. Pavel Solin is a professor of applied and computational math at the University of Nevada, Reno and the founder of NCLab. He is a passionate researcher, educator, and innovator. He believes that students do not learn most efficiently by sitting in traditional lectures or by watching videos. Students should be able to actively learn at their own pace with an expert helping them along the way. Pursuing this vision, in 2010 Dr. Solin founded NCLab (http://nclab.com), an e-learning company that provides self-paced expert-assisted college-level courses in Computational Literacy, Computer Programming, Data Analytics, and Math. NCLab is now being used at a growing number of institutions in for-credit and non-credit programs.

Sheila Crawford Bunch is the director of education for NCLab, and her team provides support for instructors, students, and trainees. As a former K-12 educator, communications business owner, and scientist, Sheila brings a lifetime of experience to help people prepare for today’s STEM careers.

Angela de Braga is currently the director of continuing education and community outreach at Great Basin College (GBC). She earned her master's degree in educational leadership and her bachelor's degree in business administration with a major in marketing, both from the University of Nevada. She served as the diversity officer for GBC and was appointed by Governor Sandoval as a diversity commissioner for the state of Nevada. She previously worked for UNR Extended Studies coordinating academic credit programs across Nevada.

Thursday, September 23, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Sponsored by NCLab!

Collaborating with Student Scholars

This webinar provides three perspectives on successful collaboration with student scholars at California State University Dominguez Hills. Dr. Laura Talamante, Professor, History, shares her experience publishing an article in a peer-reviewed journal with an undergraduate student. Dr. Doris Namala, Professor, History, explains how a campus journal was formed that is completely under the direction of undergraduate students. Jasmine Abang, Student, shares her experiences in both of these projects. Dr. John Eigenauer guides the discussion and shares experiences of working with this outstanding group of scholars.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants will learn how to work with students to improve the quality of their thinking and writing through collaborative scholarship.
  2. Participants will learn how to connect the classroom experience to collaborative undergraduate scholarship.
  3. Participants will learn how to begin a campus journal founded in undergraduate scholarship.

Dr. John Eigenauer, is a professor of philosophy at Taft College. He holds a master’s degree in English, a master’s degree in humanities, and a doctorate in interdisciplinary studies from Syracuse University, where he was the recipient of the prestigious Syracuse University Fellowship. Dr. Eigenauer has taught philosophy, English, mathematics, computer science, physics, and Spanish. He has delivered workshops nationally and internationally on the pedagogy of critical thinking and published articles on critical thinking and rationality. His most recent article, “The Problem With the Problem of Human Rationality,” published in the International Journal of Educational Reform, was highlighted in Psychology Today. Other publications of Dr. Eigenauer’s have appeared in The Historian, The Harvard Theological Review, History of Intellectual Culture, Inquiry: Critical Thinking across the Disciplines, The Rational Alternative, Thinking Skills and Creativity, Eighteenth-Century Studies, The Huntington Library Quarterly, Innovation Abstracts, and The NISOD Papers. Before joining Taft College, Dr. Eigenauer worked for Microsoft as a Senior Technology Specialist and at NASA Lewis Research Center as a Systems Analyst. He is a recipient of the NISOD Excellence Award and is a reader at The Huntington Library.

Dr. Doris Namala, served as a lecturer in the department of history at California State University, Dominguez Hills for 12 years, and is now an assistant professor of history at Riverside City College. Earning her doctorate in colonial Latin American history from UCLA, her scholarly work focuses on the study of indigenous society and culture in colonial Mexico. Dr. Namala is a strong advocate of high-impact practices and in 2016 initiated the launching of the CSUDH history department’s first student e-journal, The Toro Historical Review.  

Thursday, October 7, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Decolonizing Higher Education: A 28-Year-Old Professor’s Perspective

This session unpacks the nature and effectiveness of academic tools used by educators (e.g., lateness, exams, and textbooks) and provides participants with an understanding of culturally responsible pedagogy (e.g. school/home life dynamics, social media, and culturally sensitive syllabi). Every facet of life has evolved significantly throughout time, yet education has remained mostly the same. With the oversaturation of music, technology, and social media outside of the classroom, it is important to incorporate these elements into the classroom in order to engage students.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Understand what makes certain academic tools ineffective and learn how to either modify them or eliminate them from the syllabus completely.
  2. Understand what cultural (ethnic, generational) components are important to students and learn to incorporate them into the classroom/learning experience.
  3. Develop confidence and understanding when applying these newly learned ideas.

Jonathan Cabrera is a Dominican/Ecuadorian Latino from the New York and New Jersey area. He has worked in the fields of criminal justice, government, and nonprofit management for more than five years. These experiences include working in halfway houses, the NYC Department of Corrections, and programs for community organizations that seek to assist adolescents with schooling and employment. In 2014, Jonathan earned his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from New Jersey City University, and in 2018 he earned his master’s degree in public administration at New York University. Jonathan is now a professor in criminal justice at CUNY, Rutgers University, and a Temporary Full-Time Instructor at Hudson County Community College. Jonathan is the founder and CEO of Abstract Lifestyle, a motivational platform that encourages students to pursue higher education and entrepreneurship through presentation, artistic content, and blogs. Jonathan is also a hip-hop artist who releases music that addresses social ills.

Monday, October 11, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

How Faculty Can Drive Institutional Innovation

To mark the occasion of its 10th anniversary in 2020, the Doctorate in Community College Leadership program at Ferris State University collected examples of innovative practices from alumni and faculty. The resulting 16 essays comprise our publication Enhancing Performance: A Best Practices Guide for Innovations in Community Colleges (published by Rowman and Littlefield). In this webinar, five of the authors describe innovations from their institutions that were driven and supported by faculty.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Webinar participants learn best practices for involving faculty in innovative practices.
  2. Webinar participants learn specific examples of how to apply these practices at their own institutions to enhance teaching, learning, and student success.

The Doctorate in Community College Leadership (DCCL) program at Ferris State University (Michigan) focuses on developing leaders of mission-driven, 21st-century community colleges. Its hybrid cohort model has graduated more than 200 students, and its graduates represent over 100 colleges in 26 states. The webinar speakers include DCCL alumni Carmen Allen, faculty, Lincoln Land Community College (IL); Kris Hoffhines, associate dean, advising, Harper College (IL); Mike Couch, associate vice president, enrollment management, Martin University (IN); Tina Hummons, registrar, Sinclair Community College (OH); and Ruth Williams, assistant vice president, academic affairs, dean, curriculum and instruction, Oakton Community College (IL). Current DCCL staff members Megan Biller, program director, and Sandy Balkema, dissertation director, provide the introduction and conclusion to the webinar.

Thursday, October 28, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Sponsored by Ferris State University!

I’ve Got a Retirement Saving Tool for You: The Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

This session highlights the world of traditional and Roth IRAs, retirement savings vehicles many can take advantage of, yet not enough do. First, we will test your knowledge about these individual retirement plans that can provide tax advantages for retirement savings. Next, we will review the nuts and bolts behind each. Finally, we will review a real-life example of how to assess which IRA approach may be best for your needs.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

A 2020 Perspective on Presence

In the wake of the pandemic, many instructors are realizing that our "presence" with one another, particularly as educators, makes all the difference in the lives of our students. As we continue to regather in our communities and classrooms, it is essential that we reflect upon our shared experiences and seize this opportunity of reflection and redirection in our interactions with and instruction of our students. In this webinar, the presenter discusses his research on instructional and social presence, conducted during the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, and provides an opportunity for participants to reflect upon their own instructional journeys to determine what worked, what didn't, and how they can collectively improve in meeting the needs of their students moving forward.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Using the Community of Inquiry Framework, participants gain a foundational understanding of cognitive, instructional, and social presence.
  2. Participants learn from to the presenter’s research on presence by reflecting on their own presence in the traditional and online classroom.
  3. Participants learn specific, actionable opportunities for individual and organizational improvement with regards to presence.

Jim (James) Hilton has served in a variety of roles in the field of education for the past 17 years, including substitute teacher, instructional assistant, elementary and middle school classroom teacher, school principal, and adjunct professor. He currently teaches at Eastern Gateway Community College (EGCC) in Ohio. Along with his instructional responsibilities at EGCC, he is also the director of the college's teacher education program.

Monday, November 8, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Useful, Usable, and Actionable: How Faculty Can Use Data to Improve Student Success

Based on their book Creating a Data-Informed Culture at Community Colleges (Harvard Education Press, 2017), Brad Phillips and Jordan Horowitz bring a renowned fun and lighthearted approach to data informed practice. This webinar provides five tips designed to help faculty identify what data is important to them, turn that data into useful information, and make use of the information to inform their practice and improve their teaching and learning.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn to use data to inform their teaching and learning efforts and improve student success.
  2. Participants identify indicators that are useful, usable, and actionable and learn how to request these from their institutional research department.
  3. Participants learn how to present information in ways that tell a compelling story and engage with their colleagues to use data in support of student success.

Dr. Brad C. Phillips President and Chief Executive Officer of the Institute for Evidence-Based Change (IEBC), leads the organization’s focus on improving educational practice and outcomes in schools, colleges and universities. He has pioneered the collaborative collection and sharing of data across educational segments; the effective use of meaningful data; and its connection to educator use and institutional change. He is also the co-author of the book Creating A Data-Informed Culture In Community Colleges, published by Harvard Education Press. He is an IEBC Caring Campus coach, a frequent keynote speaker, author of numerous articles, and recipient of recognitions and honors. He has served as a data facilitator for Achieving the Dream; member of the Advisory Board of the Texas Student Success Center, member of the California Guided Pathways Advisory Board and is an Ambassador with the Leap of Reason national initiative. Dr. Phillips holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from California State University Northridge and a master’s degree in psychology from California State University Los Angeles. Prior to pursuing his doctoral degree, he worked as a therapist in community mental health. He earned his doctorate in psychology with an emphasis in research methods and statistics from Claremont Graduate University. Dr. Phillips is the founder of both the California Partnership for Achieving Student Success (Cal-PASS) and IEBC.

Jordan E. Horowitz is the chief operating officer at the Institute for Evidence-Based Change (IEBC). He has extensive experience in improving data use at educational institutions, educational partnerships, and improving postsecondary student success. Prior to joining IEBC he was the senior project director in evaluation research at WestEd, where he was employed for 16 years. Horowitz co-authored the book Creating a Data-Informed Culture in Community Colleges: A New Model for Educators with Brad Phillips, which is available from Harvard Education Press. He has conducted a number of national webinars and is an experienced coach, working with colleges to improve student success by changing data habits, engaging in behaviors that improve student connectedness, and using continuous improvement cycles. Horowitz holds a bachelor’s degree in human development and public policy from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL and master’s degree in counseling psychology from the same institution. He also received a master’s degree in applied social psychology from The Claremont Graduate School in Claremont, CA.

Monday, November 15, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Leaving Space for Creativity

Webinar participants explore various approaches, tools, and prompts for designing assignments that emphasize or encourage creativity in an online setting. When students are able to share some aspect of themselves, or have the space, permission, and confidence to create something that has personal meaning, they retain the information longer, are more excited about the topic, and gain the confidence to be creative in other aspects of their lives. Participants are provided with the opportunity to share personal stories, anecdotes, and questions.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn how to reward creativity.
  2. Participants learn the advantages of cultivating creativity.

Stacey Russell is an instructional designer at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, and teaches at West Virginia University, Pamlico Community College, Beaufort County Community College, and Maryville University. Russell holds a doctorate in flute performance from the University of South Carolina. She presented at the College Music Society National Convention in 2019 and the Music Teachers National Conference in 2021. More information can be accessed at www.staceyleerussell.com.

Thursday, November 18, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Where Are My Students? Increasing Online Presence Using Canvas

A strong teacher presence has been shown to increase interaction and improve the faculty-student connection in online learning communities. In this webinar, participants explore nine examples of increasing online teacher presence in a Canvas course. Participants have access to a public Canvas course with examples of adding instructor presence using a module that includes learning objectives, lessons, activities, and assessments. A PDF PowerPoint consists of instructional videos to explain each created item in the Canvas course.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants are able to explain the importance of online teacher presence in Canvas.
  2. Participants are able to describe nine different methods to increase online presence in Canvas.
  3. Participants are able to evaluate the efficiency of Canvas tools used to increase online presence.

Mallorie Alvarez was born and raised in the southside of San Antonio, Texas. A first-generation college student, she earned an associate’s degree from Palo Alto College and earned a full ride to the University of Northern Iowa, where she received a bachelor’s degree in English literature. After graduation, she came back to San Antonio to teach in her neighborhood. She taught high school English to at-risk populations for eight years before taking a year off to earn her master’s degree in instructional technology at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Monday, December 6, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Two Things Are Certain in This World: Today We Are Going to Discuss One ~ Taxes!

This session addresses one of the two “musts” in this world: taxes. Learn some of the underpinnings of our modern-day taxes, where our tax money goes, considerations when filing our tax returns, plus several additional facets of a part of our lives many would choose to do without.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, December 14, 2021

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Creating Engagement in the Virtual Classroom

In this webinar, participants explore ways to create engagement through the tools provided by the virtual meeting platform Zoom. They also learn additional strategies such as group brainstorming, active roll call, movement, 40-second blah-blah-blah, and off-camera reflections that are designed to keep students focused and active during virtual classes.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn to create engagement by using the basic tools within the virtual meeting platform Zoom.
  2. Participants learn to create engagement by using additional strategies such as group brainstorming, active roll call, movement, the 40-second blah-blah-blah, and off-camera reflections to foster discussion and learning.
  3. Participants identify at least one tool/strategy to adapt for use in their own virtual courses.

Rachel Cobb is the training and development director for faculty at Greenville Technical College in Greenville, South Carolina. She has been teaching in Higher Education for 13 years. She taught as an adjunct instructor for six years at USC Upstate in Spartanburg, teaching public speaking and voice and diction classes. Rachel has been teaching at Greenville Technical College for about seven years. She began as a full time instructor teaching introduction to speech communication, public speaking, honors public speaking, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, and creative inquiry. As the training and development director focused on faculty, she teaches a teaching with blackboard course for new faculty and continues to teach COL 111: E-Learning Success for new online students at GTC. Rachel is also a certified family court mediator for the state of South Carolina working to help families navigate conflict in a more productive way. Additionally, she is certified as a trainer in workplace conflict resolution training. 

Thursday, December 16, 2021

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

In Need of a Course Chiropractor? Using Distance Learning Alignment Strategies to Improve Student Success

Anyone who has ever taken a seminar or course in improving online course design has undoubtedly heard the term "alignment" again and again. Seasoned faculty sometimes resist the concept, especially when they are told to work on learning outcomes for the millionth time. However, aligning learning materials, assessments, and outcomes doesn't have to be a chore! In fact, when alignment becomes the guiding principle in course design and faculty members embrace the concepts for all of their classes, the result is greater student success.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn to define the concept of alignment between learning materials, assessments, and outcomes.
  2. Participants explore evidence of student success in courses where alignment has been made a top priority.
  3. Participants learn to create connections between learning materials, assessments, and outcomes for seated, hybrid, and fully online course delivery modalities.

Jacklyn Pierce is an assistant professor of English at Lake-Sumter State College. She teaches composition, technical writing, literature, humanities, and student success through leadership courses. In recent years, she has worked on becoming a more effective online instructor through course alignment. In studying course alignment in online classes, Jackie has also adapted alignment strategies into her seated and hybrid courses with much success. In her spare time, you can typically find her and her family wandering around Disney World.

Thursday, January 20, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Faculty Mental Wellness in Academe: Is Leadership Up to the Challenge?

In an era of global pandemics, social distancing, covered faces, and vaccine debates, college educators and their students are expected to forge ahead. Yet the question arises: Is leadership prepared? Much is made of student mental wellness, and rightly so, but the pandemic has proven that educators’ mental health cannot go ignored. Academic leaders must equip themselves with new insights and paradigms related to fostering mental wellness among faculty. Self-care before student-care is the new mantra. This webinar sheds light on what needs to happen now in order to help faculty thrive.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants understand why toxic leadership at community colleges disempowers and contributes to the poor mental health of faculty.
  2. Participants learn how supervision style can impact faculty mental health.
  3. Participants learn pertinent laws, regulations, and policies governing mental disabilities in higher education and whether leadership gets a passing mark in this area.

Dr. Mignette Yvonne Dorsey was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. She is an award-winning former newspaper journalist, having worked for Houston Community Newspapers, The Houston Post, and The Houston Chronicle. She has also worked as a spokesperson for the city of Houston and was the city’s first Bicycle-Pedestrian Coordinator, appointed by Mayor Lee P. Brown. After her stint in politics, she taught high school journalism and reading and is currently a professor of English at Lone Star College-Houston North. As a child, Dr. Dorsey became familiar with her father’s historical struggle for civil rights via newspaper articles, but it was during her years at The Houston Post that she began researching in earnest. Her book, Speak Truth to Power, the Story of Charles Patrick, a Civil Rights Pioneer, was published by The University of Alabama Press and is available on Amazon. Dr. Dorsey is also a 2017 alumnus of Lone Star College’s Leadership Academy, a 2016 alumnus of the Deans and Chairs Institute, and a 2021 Lone Star College Faculty Excellence Award winner. Dr. Dorsey earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature from the University of Houston. She earned her doctorate in leadership from Carolina Christian College in Spring 2021 after completing her dissertation: "Leading Mentally Ill Employees in Higher Education and Managing Self in the Process."

Monday, January 24, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Financing the College Experience

This session focuses on various considerations, approaches, and strategies one might consider regarding financing higher education.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Reboot Your Class by Teaching With Presence and Compassion

As faculty enter the post-Covid teaching arena, there are many strategies available to bring life and engagement to their classes. Contrary to what students think, online courses are not effortless. Online courses require students to have self-management, discipline, and inner motivation. Faculty can help foster these success traits by being present and showing compassion in their classes. Participants leave this webinar with seven ways to show presence and compassion in their online or face-to-face courses.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants are able to list seven strategies that can be used to teach with presence and compassion.
  2. Participants learn the benefits for students when faculty teach with presence and compassion.
  3. Participants can ascertain which strategy or strategies they can use, adapt, or modify.

Essie Childers has taught for 33 years, with a focus on mentoring and encouraging students to visualize success to reach their academic and personal goals. For the past 14 years she has developed a strong track record of teaching first-year students through the Learning Frameworks courses, EDUC 1300 courses, and integrated reading and writing courses at Blinn College in Bryan, Texas. In addition, Essie developed the first online EDUC 1300 Learning Frameworks course at Blinn College. Essie is past president of the Texas Community College Teachers Association, comprised of over 6,000 teachers and administrators in Texas, and now serves on the Foundation Board. In August 2020, Essie was selected as a You’re the Tops Honoree for making a difference in the Bryan, College Station community. CASP (College Academic and Support Programs) awarded Essie with a Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contributions in developmental education. She is a 2018 Distinguished Alumni from Longview Independent School District, May 2018 Cengage Faculty Partner of the Month, a 2017 Carol Dochen Developmental Educator of the year recipient, a 2014 recipient of CRLA’s Distinguished Teaching Award, a 2014 Outstanding Service Award from Blinn Professional Association, 2013 On Course Ambassador of the Year Award, and a volunteer consultant for the American Association for Adjunct Educators. Additionally, Essie serves on the QEP Development Team at Blinn College and is a Senior Fellow of the first Blinn College Future Works Academy.

Thursday, February 3, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Art, Imitating Life: Integrating Humanities for Teaching Social Sciences

Undoubtedly, higher education benefits from collaboration across disciplines. This webinar highlights the use of the humanities to enrich social science instruction. Methodologically, using the humanities as a lens for the social sciences allows students to gain a deeper understanding of often complex, nuanced concepts and unfamiliar phenomena in human behavior. Students benefit from the integration of the humanities in the classroom as it lends an additional, richer dimension to learning, similar to that of narrative-style teaching. Such methods may further contribute to positive student outcomes as it enhances learning via the use of multiple-modalities, addresses the variety of learning styles students may have, helps with knowledge retention, holds students’ interest in the classroom, and provides a broader learning context across disciplines (including art, literature, history, theatre, dance, and filmmaking).

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn the basic ideas underpinning this approach to teaching.
  2. Participants learn how using art to teach social sciences can enhance interest, attention, and retention of critical concepts and theory.
  3. Participants learn how to adopt this approach in their own classrooms.

Rachel L. Austin is a faculty instructor in sociology and psychology at Blue Ridge Community College. She has been a lecturer/instructor at a variety of higher-education institutions, including a state university, private four-year college, several technical colleges, and multiple community colleges throughout central and western North Carolina and the upper Piedmont of South Carolina. Rachel holds a master’s degree in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and a master’s degree in psychology (forensic track) from the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks. She completed her undergraduate work at the University of South Carolina Upstate, where she earned bachelor’s degrees in sociology and psychology (experimental track), and was the recipient of the C. Wright Mills Award in Sociology. She has been awarded grants for presenting original research, positional works, and pedagogical methods at a variety of conferences across the U.S. and abroad, in both traditional and digital format. Her work has been published in the refereed academic journals Sociological Inquiry and The Journal for Animal Ethics. She is an expert reviewer for Oxford University Press in the areas of social movements and criminology.

Eliana Kotsias is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Printmaking at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. She also works as an independent artist and Studio & Gallery Assistant at Starfangled Press in Brevard, North Carolina. Eliana is a graduate of Blue Ridge Community College and holds an Associate's of Fine Arts (Summa cum Laude).

Monday, February 7, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Helping Students Become Extraordinary: Using the CliftonStrengths Assessment to Enhance Engagement and Retention at Community Colleges

In this webinar, which is geared toward all community college professionals who work in instruction, advising, admissions, and student affairs, participants learn how to use the CliftonStrengths Assessment to increase student engagement and retention. This assessment provides an individualized and in-depth analysis of the natural talents of students. The student version of the analysis provides specific actions that students can take to enhance their community college experience and align directly with what they do naturally and best. This includes the types of careers to consider, activities to get involved in, how to approach course assignments, and how to communicate with professors and classmates.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants are able to explain the CliftonStrengths framework and its relevance to the community college, the classroom experience, and retention.
  2. Participants learn how to provide personalized learning and support for their students through a strengths-based lens (focusing on what students do best).
  3. Participants are able to design activities to help community college students develop 21st-century skills.

Kismet Loftin-Bell is currently the coordinator of student leadership and honor programs in the department of Student Life and Engagement at Forsyth Technical Community College in Winston-Salem, NC. She teaches political science at two regional community colleges and serves as the lead advisor for the Alpha Mu Rho chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK), is a 2020-2021 PTK Faculty Scholar, and serves as the Social Science Representative on the PTK Honors Program Council. Kismet is also a Gallup-Certified CliftonStrengths Coach.

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Using Restorative Practices to Interrupt and Address Microaggressions in the Classroom

Those of us engaged in the work of addressing identity in the classroom by discussing issues related to race, gender, age, ability, religion, class, sexual identity, and culture have, at some point, encountered unconscious bias in the form of microaggressions. Even though the harm may have been unintended, the impact is surely felt. This webinar provides strategies to help educators keep difficult conversations from derailing or shutting down altogether by asking important questions that get at the root of thoughts, explore feelings, weigh the impact of words, and repair harm in the moment.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn to recognize three forms of microaggressions: microinsults, macroassaults, and microinvalidations.
  2. Participants understand how restorative practices can be used in the classroom to foster connection to prevent microaggressions and repair harm when microaggressions occur.
  3. Participants learn five questions to ask to interrupt and address microaggressions when they occur.

Dr. Andrea Dardello has served on the front lines as a community college educator for 28 years, bridging the gap between students' lived experiences and academia. She is a culturally responsive teaching practitioner whose research focuses on teaching through the lens of dignity. Her current work, Teaching with Dignity, is a hybrid professional development course that helps faculty close opportunity gaps by providing strategies that allow students to be seen, heard, valued, and feel safe, thus optimizing learning, retention, and success. Andrea is a contributing author to the book, Defining, Locating, and Addressing Bullying in the WPA Workplace. Her chapter, entitled “Breaking the Silence of Racism and Bullying in Academia: Leaning in to a Hard Truth,” explores storytelling as a vehicle for healing, understanding, and change. She is a widow and proud mother of a 12-year-old son.

Monday, March 7, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Guide to Teaching Financial Responsibility

This session provides financial basics every parent or grandparent can share with their kids or grandkids.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Career and College Promise: Helping Students Be All They Can Be!

This webinar describes the Career and College Promise (CCP) Team and its impact on student success. By offering support before, during, and after enrollment, the CCP team holistically serves each student and develops a symbiotic relationship with local high schools. Nash Community College doubled the number of courses being taken by our CCP population from Spring 2020 to Spring 2021, and our statistics with student success remained stable. This webinar provides best practices for supporting students and partnering with high school and college personnel. Participants learn easy-to-implement strategies that increase enrollment and student retention.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants learn specific strategies to increase student success.
  2. Participants learn best practices in regards to supporting students before, during, and after enrollment in CCP Programs.
  3. Participants learn specific strategies for strengthening partnerships with local high schools.

Mindi Collins is the director of Career and College Promise program at Nash Community College.

Monday, April 4, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Plan for the Future: How an Estate Plan Puts You in Control

This session focuses on strategies you can use to care for the people and things you love and how to leave a lasting and meaningful legacy.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Positive Impacts of Bridge, Dual Enrollment, and Support Programs for All Students: Foundations for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

In the face of the pandemic and a decline in college enrollment numbers, it is now more important than ever to build bridges and create support systems for students. This webinar focuses on identifying the needs of diverse students and explores how to create equitable, inclusive approaches to use in the classroom by addressing access to technology, overall program funding, and tuition support along with employment while enrolled. A learner-centered academic approach benefits all students, but particularly under-resourced, underrepresented, and first-generation student populations.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants identify and highlight best practices, polices, and frameworks for strategic, equitably-based approaches to allocating resources and building support programs for student retention/success.
  2. Participants create collaborative, community action plan frameworks to engage diverse stakeholders.
  3. Participants understand how diverse, equitable, and inclusive resources increase the capacity, retention, and bridge-building of learning communities.

Leesa Riviere is a San Francisco Bay Area native with over a decade of experience as a professional researcher and scholar practitioner in the field of education. She greatly enjoys the honor and privilege of serving her community in various capacities, such as supporting students, faculty, staff, families, and learning communities in various leadership and professional roles. She is a first-generation doctoral student in the organizational development and change program with a concentration in media technology and innovation at Fielding Graduate University. She earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology with a concentration in organization and inequalities and a minor in science technology and society from Santa Clara University. She also earned her master’s degrees in educational leadership and human development from Santa Clara University and Fielding Graduate University, respectively. 

Thursday, April 21, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Fair Warning and Fair Use: Copyright and Plagiarism in the Digital Age

Changes in how education is provided, the easy availability of online resources, and the constant addition of new technologies create a confusing mixture of information on what copyright covers and why it matters to instructors. Digital learning and Open Educational Resources (OER) have increased the need for a clear understanding of what is free from copyright and what constitutes fair use. This webinar introduces instructors to the basics of copyright and how to apply copyright in a variety of classroom instructional settings, such as hybrid, blended, interactive, online, or face-to-face. A list of resources on copyright, digital learning, and copyright-free material is provided.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants understand intellectual property, its history and importance, and how to implement good digital practices to protect themselves and their institutions.
  2. Participants are able to recognize copyrighted materials or those requiring attribution and those which are free to use without attribution or permission.
  3. Participants apply the methods they have learned to classroom settings (digital or face-to-face) and guide their students to practice good informational skills.

Lisa Hullett is a librarian at Wallace State Community College in Alabama. Her experience in a wide variety of educational settings includes being an elementary school librarian, a university librarian, a history instructor at a community college, and her current position as head librarian at Wallace State Community College. She has presented on copyright and its issues at two seminars and a workshop for her campus.

Thursday, May 5, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Developing New, Better, and More Loves

The New York Times columnist and author, David Brooks, has stated, "A key job of a school is to give students new things to love." Although an essential part of education is to develop skills and traits that will lead to a successful career, this is by no means the only purpose of college. Using a cross-disciplinary approach backed by research from humanistic psychology, philosophy, and literature, this webinar explores the importance of reframing education as something beyond career development, and targeting the higher experience in all of us. Applicable to any subject area, this webinar builds on the idea that we learn best from those people with whom we develop a meaningful rapport and trust. Finally, activities and discussions have been curated to help foster a positive, affirmational pedagogy which rekindles the deeper purpose of education: To maximize potential.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Participants can explain the assumptions and methods of cross-disciplinary, humanistic approaches to individual/subjective experience in terms of learning and teaching.
  2. Participants can analyze and implement self-actualization and learned optimism as both concepts and behavioral practices, attitudes, and habits.
  3. Participants can assess human potential and agency to find meaning and purpose, and develop ways to coach and mentor others in maximizing their potential.

Dr. Aaron Lawler is an assistant professor of humanities at Waubonsee Community College, and has had nearly 20 years of experience as an educator. He earned his doctorate from Concordia University, two master's degrees from North Central College and Concordia University, respectively, and a bachelor's degree from North Central College. He serves on two elected boards: The Kaneland District 302 School Board, and the WTTW Channel 11 Community Board. He is a researcher at Chicago's Field Museum, and a lifelong member of the National Geographic Society. He has published two peer-reviewed articles, a young adult novel, and is a classically trained painter. He was recently named Faculty of the Year at Waubonsee Community College, earned the Dale P. Parnell Faculty Distinction Recognition Award and the NISOD Excellence Award, and was nominated for Outstanding Full-Time Faculty Member by the Illinois Community College Trustees Association.

Monday, May 9, 2022

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Plan for Your-Future: Your Social Security Benefits

This session addresses various aspects of the well-known social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivor benefits.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, May 31, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Insurance, Insurance, Everywhere

The goal of our discussion is to better understand insurance as a means of protection from financial loss. Indeed, a key aspect of the financial planning process is to not only achieve success with your money, but to recognize that one aspect of this success is considering the risk management side of the financial equation.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image

Investing: Getting Started, Keeping it Going, Cashing In

This seminar will outline several key components of smart investing, including how to break planning into manageable steps and how to identify and mitigate risk that can throw off financial and retirement goals.

Glenn Kent works as a financial advisor with Ameriprise. He earned an associate degree while attending community college in Pennsylvania and continued his path in education, obtaining a PhD in psychology. In addition to financial advising, Glenn teaches at the community and state college levels in Virginia. With advanced education and training in psychology, Glenn appreciates the important role of emotions and behavior in successful financial planning and investing. Glenn is an exercise enthusiast and lives in the city of Roanoke with his wife and three children.

Tuesday, August 23, 2022

Pacific: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mountain: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Central: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Eastern: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sponsored By Logo image