Upcoming Webinars

White Privilege: What is It Really? How Can It Be Used to Help Others Who Lack That Privilege?

In this webinar, Dr. Fuller explains the term “white privilege”—who has it and why. Anthropologists use the term “enculturation” to describe how we learn what family, community, and society look like. The norms we enculturate as children may incorporate implicit biases which become invisible to us as adults. Until recently, white men predominantly created institutions and set the agenda in United States government, business, and higher education. For much of the population, there may be comfort in this familiar norm. But this frame of reference chafes and harms many others. The term “white privilege” is used to raise awareness that one person’s norm can be another person’s harm.

During this webinar, Dr.Fuller presents examples that give participants a clearer idea of what white privilege is. She also discusses ways we can use our privilege to help others and ways in which implicit biases can be made explicit and frames of reference can be changed.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Be able to explain white privilege.  
  • Become more aware of implicit biases and frames of reference and how these may impact interactions with colleagues and students.
  • Learn how to use white privilege to help those without it.
  • Understand how following a diverse set of individuals on social media can reduce implicit biases and alter frames of reference which can improve our interactions with colleagues and students.
  • Determine appropriate ways to intervene in situations that may lead to conflict among colleagues and students.

Dr. Kathleen Fuller is an Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Metropolitan Community College-Maple Woods. She played an active role in shaping diversity, equity, and inclusion at Johnson County Community College, the University of Kansas School of Medicine (KUMC-SOM), and MCC-Maple Woods. While at KUMC-SOM, Dr. Fuller developed the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in Medicine. She has given seminars and lectures on diversity and inclusion to the American Association of Colleges and Universities, the Meeting of South Florida Dermatologists, Texas Christian University Conference, Diversity in Teaching and Learning in American Higher Education, and the Central States Anthropological Society. Her scientific publications can be accessed on Google Scholars Page. She also writes extensively on equity and inclusion in her blog: Display Adaptability.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Dante Meets Einstein at Café Paradiso: Renewing the Vows Between Humanities and Science

Dante’s narrative poem The Divine Comedy and Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity were both inspired by the octagonal mosaic ceiling of the Baptistry of Saint John in Florence, Italy. Gazing upward, both Einstein and Dante realized the same beauty in two different but unified worlds: the arts and the sciences. Over time, this union has dissolved into the arts or the sciences. Grab your seat at Café Paradiso and watch Dante and Einstein meet for the first time in this webinar! Participate in a conversation that renews the vows between beauty, art, poetry, science, and mathematics, demonstrating how the humanities and social sciences are a critical component in inspiring curiosity and creativity within the sciences.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn new strategies and methodologies that incorporate the sciences and the humanities to inspire a more creative individual.
  • Learn about The Inspirational Six (The-i6), a method we created by studying some of the greatest scientific and artistic minds, Einstein and Dante.
  • Learn how to use each of The-i6 Strategies: Animate, Originate, Rejuvenate, Stimulate, Deus Ex Machina, and to Tell the Story.

Anthony Pitucco, Physics, Mathematics, and Philosophy, Pima Community College (retired)
Anthony (Tony) Pitucco is best known as the creative educator who injected comedy and acting into his physics lectures at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Tony has been involved in higher education for more than 40 years. He was the chair of the physics and astronomy departments at Pima Community College where he also taught mathematics, philosophy, and humanities. Tony holds several awards, including The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Science Arizona Professor of the Year Award, The Dr. Wayne McGrath Outstanding Faculty Award, and the Pima Community College Outstanding Faculty Award, and was selected in 1994 by USA Today to receive the Teaching Excellence Award Top 50 Professors in the USA. Tony has authored articles that have appeared in various academic journals and NISOD’s Innovation Abstracts. He also co-authored a children’s textbook titled The Restaurant at the Beginning of the Universe. Tony holds a B.S. in Physics, a M.Ed. in Philosophy and Foundations of Education, a M.S. in Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics in the area of mathematical physics.

Stewart Barr, Philosophy, Humanities, and Linguistics, Pima Community College (retired)
Stewart Barr’s unique “Mephistophelian” style of teaching attracted hundreds of students with the desire not just to learn, but to think differently during his more than 35 years in higher education. He was the chair of the humanities, philosophy, religion, and speech departments at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. He was awarded the Best of Pima Award, Outstanding Faculty Award, and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty of the Year at Pima Community College Award. In 2006 he was invited to present at the Oxford Roundtable on Religion and the State. He has also worked across curricula to develop interdisciplinary courses such as Bio-Medical Ethics in Biology, Philosophy of Law for Business, and the Philosophical Foundations of Science for Physics. He holds a B.A. in Philosophy with a minor in Comparative Religion, an M.A. in Oriental Studies with a minor in Linguistics, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Register Now