Upcoming Webinars

Five Breakout Moves to Build a Community of Powerful Learners

Active-learning environments run the risk of devolving into chaos or replicating larger systems of inequity that exist outside the classroom. This webinar includes research-based strategies for developing a community of powerful learners in an active-learning classroom. Topics include co-developing norms around group learning, fostering a positive academic classroom mindset, deciding if a task is “group-worthy," and learning students’ names. Participants in this webinar learn (1) how to create a classroom structure that allows students to safely explore, experiment, improvise, take risks, make mistakes, and co-construct new knowledge with their peers; (2) strategies to ensure that inquiry-based group learning is inclusive and equitable for students from all backgrounds; (3) instructional moves that can immediately be incorporated into pedagogy to ensure their inquiry-based group learning approach is inclusive, engaging, and equitable.

Felicia Darling, Instructor, College Skills, Santa Rosa Junior College
Dr. Felicia Darling is the author of Teachin’ It! Breakout Moves That Break Down Barriers for Community College Students. Dr. Darling is a first-generation college student who taught mathematics for 30 years at the secondary and college levels. She possesses a Ph.D. in Education from Stanford University and is a Fulbright Scholar. She holds a Bachelor’s in Mathematics, an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction, a California single-subject math credential, and a California Teacher of English Learners Certificate.

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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60 Free Software Tools in 60 Minutes

During this webinar, discover free, but little-known, technology tools available for faculty, staff, administrators, and students to use for improving student engagement in the classroom, as well the workflow of everyday tasks. Participants leave with at least one tool they can immediately put to use. A total of 60 tools in the following categories will be presented to help increase engagement and efficiency across a variety of workflows:

  • Office productivity
  • Grammar
  • Survey instruments
  • Cloud-based storage
  • Video and presentation
  • Image and audio editors
  •  Content management systems
  • Plagiarism checkers
  • Communications tools
  • App development and creation
  • File conversion

…and more!

Robert McWilliamsCoordinator, Instructional Design, Bishop State Community College
Robert McWilliams has been involved with computers and counseling as it relates to the collegiate environment for over fifteen years. He has worked at several colleges as a Data Project Specialist, Adjunct Instructor, Network Administrator, and Undergraduate Advisor. Robert is an avid traveler, multi-instrumentalist, and recent author, and he has been featured on numerous television networks.

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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At the Heart of Retention Programs and Practices: Creating an Environment of Mattering and Validation for Community College Students

This webinar presents the connection between community college student persistence and the important roles mattering and validation play in student success. Based upon Schlossberg's (1989) Mattering Theory and Rendon's (1994) Validation Theory, the webinar demonstrates practical and simple ways faculty members can communicate to students that they matter to the institution and that they have the ability to be successful, powerful learners. Calling upon an extensive literature review, as well as data gathered from a qualitative study of community college faculty, this webinar encourages participants to engage in practices that affirm and help students connect to course content and the institution.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Recognize the challenges faced by today's community college students, particularly those students who are especially at risk for attrition.
  • Develop an understanding of Mattering and Validation theories and the role that mattering and validation play in retention and attrition.
  • Become familiar with specific interventions, strategies, activities, behaviors, and attitudes that community college faculty members have identified as particularly effective in promoting student persistence in their courses.
  • Examine your behaviors and practices to assess in what ways you are or could be promoting a sense of mattering and validation among your students.

Kim RussellProfessor, English and Chair, Professional Development, West Kentucky Community and Technical College
Kimberly Russell is the English Program Coordinator and a professor of English at West Kentucky Community and Technical College (WKCTC). She has coordinated the WKCTC new faculty training program, Reach for the Stars, and has served as a peer consultant for faculty in the promotion process. Kimberly also chairs the WKCTC Professional and Organizational Development Committee, with her favorite part of that job being the opportunity to provide meaningful professional development programming on campus. Educated at Southeast Missouri State University, Kimberly has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and a master’s degree in composition. In spring 2019, she earned a doctorate in education from the University of Kentucky. Her dissertation research focused on the role of mattering and validation in community college student persistence, as well as concrete ways in which community college faculty can use their interactions with students to promote student persistence by letting students know they are important and that they can be powerful, successful learners.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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White Privilege: What is it Really? How Can it Be Used to Help Others Who Lack That Privilege?

In this webinar, Dr. Fuller explains the term “white privilege”—who has it and why. Anthropologists use the term “enculturation” to describe how we learn what family, community, and society look like. The norms we enculturate as children may incorporate implicit biases which become invisible to us as adults. Until recently, white men predominantly created institutions and set the agenda in United States government, business, and higher education. For much of the population, there may be comfort in this familiar norm. But this frame of reference chafes and harms many others. The term “white privilege” is used to raise awareness that one person’s norm can be another person’s harm.

During this webinar, Dr.Fuller presents examples that give participants a clearer idea of what white privilege is. She also discusses ways we can use our privilege to help others and ways in which implicit biases can be made explicit and frames of reference can be changed.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Be able to explain white privilege.  
  • Become more aware of implicit biases and frames of reference and how these may impact interactions with colleagues and students.
  • Learn how to use white privilege to help those without it.
  • Understand how following a diverse set of individuals on social media can reduce implicit biases and alter frames of reference which can improve our interactions with colleagues and students.
  • Determine appropriate ways to intervene in situations that may lead to conflict among colleagues and students.

Dr. Kathleen Fuller is an Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Metropolitan Community College-Maple Woods. She played an active role in shaping diversity, equity, and inclusion at Johnson County Community College, the University of Kansas School of Medicine (KUMC-SOM), and MCC-Maple Woods. While at KUMC-SOM, Dr. Fuller developed the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in Medicine. She has given seminars and lectures on diversity and inclusion to the American Association of Colleges and Universities, the Meeting of South Florida Dermatologists, Texas Christian University Conference, Diversity in Teaching and Learning in American Higher Education, and the Central States Anthropological Society. Her scientific publications can be accessed on Google Scholars Page. She also writes extensively on equity and inclusion in her blog: Display Adaptability.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Pacific: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mountain: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Central: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Eastern: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Register Now