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Host a Campus Virtual Workshop

Host a Virtual Workshop on your campus exclusively for your faculty, administrators, and staff!

With the global COVID-19 pandemic predicted to last several more months and possibly longer, it’s clear that new ways of work and access to virtual events are now more important than ever!

To that end, NISOD has assembled an outstanding collection of Virtual Workshops designed specifically for community and technical college educators. Our Virtual Workshops make it possible for you to schedule a safe professional development opportunity exclusively for your faculty, administrators, and staff so they can share experiences, network, and learn from one another as they address issues and best practices specifically relevant to their institution.

The fee structure, which includes the facilitator stipend, is as follows:

Member College Rate
# of Participants Fee
<15 $3,000
15-25 $4,000
26-50 $5,000
51-75 $5,500
76-100 $6,000
101-125 $6,500
126-150 $7,000
>150 $8,000
Non-Member College Rate*
# of Participants Fee
<15 $4,500
15-25 $6,000
26-50 $7,500
51-75 $8,250
76-100 $9,000
101-125 $9,750
126-150 $10,500
>150 $12,000

*It’s not too late to join NISOD at a prorated rate!

Roles and Responsibilities

  • College and NISOD work together to identify an ideal date or dates.
  • NISOD contracts with and pays the Virtual Workshop facilitator(s).
  • NISOD provides the Zoom delivery platform.
  • College promotes the Virtual Workshop to its faculty, administrators, and staff and provides NISOD with a list of participants.
  • NISOD provides participants with the details needed to access the Virtual Workshop.
  • NISOD invoices College following the conclusion of the Virtual Workshop.

As you can see, there’s not a whole lot involved on the college’s end when hosting one of our Virtual Workshops. However, you’ll be able to provide your faculty, administrators, and staff access to a cost-effective, high-quality, and high-impact learning experience without the need for them to physically attend the event!

To provide your college’s faculty, administrators, and staff access to a cost-effective, high-quality, and high-impact learning experience, please contact Edward Leach at ed@nisod.org or (512) 232-1430 for additional information or to arrange to have a Virtual Workshop brought to your campus.

Available Workshops

Are you experiencing trouble concentrating? Are you struggling to regulate your emotions or experiencing sleep disturbances? These behaviors are normal reactions to high stress and trauma. Unfortunately, it’s easy for your brain to form pathways in response to anxiety, stress, and trauma. The more these pathways fire, the more likely they are to fire again and become “hardwired.” It’s important to rewire these pathways into feelings of calmness, resilience, and happiness.
Anxiety, stress, and trauma can damage your health and lead to long-term mental disorders such as depression. They also inhibit higher-order executive functions, while strongly activating the emotional centers. This makes it harder to remember, pay attention, think critically, plan, organize, and control emotions. Anxiety, stress, and trauma can affect family and home life, resulting in higher rates of substance abuse and domestic and health issues. Unfortunately, your anxiety, stress, and trauma are also contagious to students, and can impair their learning.
During this two-part workshop, participants learn the science behind how stress affects them and actions that can be taken to effectively address it.

  • In Module 1, participants learn why their brain feels foggy and why they aren’t performing optimally. They also learn about two nervous systems: fight/flight and rest/digest, as well as how to switch their physiology into the calming nervous system. Participants acquire recovering strategies—including how to calm down quickly—and practices they can use to inhibit the fight/flight response that impairs mental and physical health.
  • In Module 2, participants focus on renewing and rewiring. It isn’t enough to stop stress every time it occurs; you must learn to stop it from occurring in the first place. Participants learn lifestyle practices that renew the mind, brain, and body, and reduce feelings of high stress. Participants also learn about the process of burnout and where and how they can stop it. The module concludes with information about post-traumatic growth, so that when these difficult times are over, participants remain as mentally healthy as possible and are ready to resume a normal life.

Learn what science recommends when undergoing anxiety, stress, and trauma, and experience multiple ways to create calm, resilience, and happiness pathways that work specifically for you!

About the Facilitator

Dr. Janet Zadina

“Powerful!” “Engaging!” “Innovative!” and “Life Changing!” are just a few ways audiences describe presentations by Dr. Janet Zadina. Dr. Zadina is an internationally renowned speaker, consultant, author, and former high school and community college teacher, known for her extraordinary ability to inform, educate, and empower audiences with brain research. Dr. Zadina has made such an impact on the academic community that the Society for Neuroscience honored her with the prestigious 2011 Science Educator Award. This recognition solidified her reputation as a significant contributor to public education and the field of educational neuroscience. Through her transformative, powerful, and entertaining workshops, Dr. Zadina is changing the way teachers, students, and even business professionals understand and use the brain.

Dr. Zadina’s determination to tear down brain myths and build up lives was born from her personal experiences working with dyslexic students. When she learned that a new “window” into the brain was possible with neuroimaging, she knew she had to go back to school and study neuroscience. She earned a Ph.D. in Education while conducting MRI research on neurodevelopmental language disorders at Tulane Medical School. She then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in cognitive neuroscience.

Dr. Zadina bridges the fields of education and neuroscience in her visionary work and the magic of her presentations. Her years of research, writing, and teaching enable her to educate others with science and strategies to transform education. As the founder and CEO of Brain Research and Instruction, she teaches and models best practices in educational neuroscience when presenting keynote speeches and workshops worldwide. She has been honored as a Distinguished Fellow in the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations, among other honors. She is the author of textbooks as well as professional development books, including Multiple Pathways to the Student Brain. She is a co-founder of the Butterfly Project, a pro-bono initiative designed to help educators who have experienced natural disasters.

This workshop helps participants meet important needs that all organizations share: Improving employee inclusion and mitigating the risk of negative financial and legal consequences. This workshop explores how diverse individuals can feel safe engaging in tough conversations and bringing their whole selves to work, and how organizations can make real and positive change so everyone feels valued and included.

Module 1
Transformational Change Within an Organization
The objective of this module is to increase participants’ awareness of the role they play in their organization's diversity and inclusion culture. Participants explore who needs a diversity and inclusion program and why it is so important to have one. Also discussed are various stereotypes and the difference between a stereotype and an implicit bias.

Module 2
It Takes a TEAM
During this module, participants discuss why they should look beyond the surface to create an inclusive environment. The facilitator covers the EEOC, employment discrimination, protected classes, and the purpose of current legislation. Participants discuss internal versus external customers, the difference between a thermostat and a thermometer, and what it means to have a genuine desire to listen. Lastly, participants discuss documenting and reporting incidents and how an employer should respond when an incident is reported.

By the end of this workshop, participants know or be able to:

  • Understand diversity, inclusion, and organizational culture.
  • Identify the stereotypes and biases that slow down progress in an organization.
  • Plan and investigate ways to create an inclusive workplace.
  • Understand what it means to be a TEAM.
  • Analyze Pauli’s Exclusion Principle.
  • Understand lived experiences and how to value others.
  • Learn the art of communication.
  • Increase diversity and inclusion awareness in the workplace.

Plans for Audience Participation and Interaction:

  • View video clips.
  • Discuss the materials with peers in breakout sessions.
  • Explore the workshop manual.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Nicole Rankine, affectionately known as Dr. Nic, is one of the most engaging personal development coaches around. She is a certified teacher, speaker, and coach with the John Maxwell Team, which founded the COLE Academy of Personal Growth, a training and development company devoted to helping students and the educational leaders that support them with leadership development, personal growth, and communication. Using John Maxwell’s proven leadership development tactics, strategies, and skills, Dr. Rankine provides training for leaders of schools, colleges, and universities. Dr. Rankine has trained leaders internationally in Costa Rica, Kenya, South Africa, and China. She holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree in public health and a master’s degree in biology. She is fun, high energy, and exhibits a passion for helping others reach their full potential.

Even before the COVID-19 Pandemic changed the way higher education delivered instruction, EDUCAUSE’s 2019 Horizon Report stated that a significant development in higher education would be increased mobile learning. In March 2020, we all became mobile educators and learners, with the expectation that faculty members engage students in virtual environments as rich in relevant and meaningful experiences as are available in face-to-face classrooms.

In an era in which all faculty members should all be prepared to teach in a virtual environment, we need tools to effectively and efficiently instruct, monitor, motivate, captivate, and assess our students beyond what our LMS may provide.

The purpose of this three-part workshop is to expose faculty members to websites and apps that can be used to increase student engagement and achievement in virtual and face-to-face classrooms.

Module 1:

  • Using text messaging apps to communicate with students on a regular basis.
  • Assessing student comprehension of interactive online lecture material.

Module 2:

  • Creating video tutorials, with assessment questions embedded within those self-made videos.
  • Communicating with students using visual discussion boards.

Module 3:

  • Providing students with the ability to create their own videos that demonstrate mastery of course topics.
  • Engaging with students via online scavenger hunts related to course learning outcomes.

Workshop participants are able to contact the facilitator following the conclusion of each module for assistance and coaching as they design their creations.

About the Facilitator

Sean J. Glassberg, the recipient of the 2013 TYCA-Southeast Cowan Award for Teaching Excellence and the 2007 Professor of the Year at Horry Georgetown Technical College, has academic and professional experience, ranging from teaching English at community colleges and universities to training industry and technical professionals to become educators. Sean has been teaching in the community college environment for over 25 years and has employed many digital teaching and learning tools since he started teaching online classes in 2002. Coming from a family of educators has provided Sean with a solid foundation of best-teaching practices. His master’s degree in Special Education and experience with children with disabilities have enabled Sean to respond to a wide spectrum of learners. His passion to help others in and out of the classroom led him to found Racers for Pacers, a non-profit organization with a mission to include children with disabilities in the running community.

Inclusive courses require intentionality during planning and teaching. During Module One of this Virtual Workshop, participants explore integrated course design to create inclusive syllabi and assessments that center on course learning outcomes. Participants are encouraged to bring a current syllabus and assessment to revise. During Module Two, participants examine a variety of inclusive pedagogical practices and assess their own teaching using research on building community and validation. This workshop models interactive learning in the remote environment with an emphasis on practice and application.

Module One: Design

  • Designing an inclusive syllabus.
  • Creating inclusive assessments.

Module Two: Delivery

  • Establishing a community where students feel known, acknowledged, accepted, and are able to contribute and feel comfortable doing so.
  • Assessing the use of validating practices.
  • Managing hot moments.
  • Developing an action plan.

About the Facilitator

Gena Merliss is Coordinator of Monroe Community College’s Teaching and Creativity Center. Gena works with faculty to develop critical reflection in order to improve instruction and student learning. Prior to her current role, Gena taught developmental math and integrated reading and writing as an Assistant Professor. In that position, Gena experimented with many different strategies to help students develop non-cognitive skills and self-awareness. Gena earned a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Bachelor’s in Biological Anthropology from Swarthmore College.

Renee Dimino, associate professor and SUNY Guided Pathways project director, works with community colleges across SUNY to support their work implementing guided pathways. In her faculty role, she has worked to redesign developmental education, teaches College Success (COS) courses, oversees the COS program, and coordinates COS adjunct faculty. She values reflective practice and has a passion for student success and faculty development. Renee holds a bachelor’s degree in education from SUNY Geneseo and a master’s degree in education from SUNY Brockport.

As faculty developers, we have the opportunity to build our faculty’s capacity for reflective practice. But, with all the demands on their time, how do we effectively design meaningful learning experiences that make faculty come back to us?

This question is especially relevant now because of the COVID-19-related changes to college instruction. Faculty are grappling with a new set of challenges in the typically solitary culture of higher education. This two-part workshop helps faculty developers design and facilitate collegial conversations to improve teaching practice and educational equity. Using equity as a foundation for the workshop, participants stay connected to the purpose of improving teaching practice to ensure learning for every student.

Each module models collaborative conversations while providing opportunities for participants to reflect on their own learning.

Module 1: Designing Collaborative Spaces That Build the Capacity for Reflective Practice

  • Build relational trust and encourage risk taking.
  • Develop “shared agreements” for courageous conversations with colleagues.
  • Structure effective conversations about improving teaching practice.
  • Use probing questions to build reflective habits.

Module 2: Facilitating Professional Learning

  • Use protocols to shape collegial conversations about educational equity.
  • Develop effective facilitation skills.
  • Engage in reflective practice.
  • Create an action plan to be used on your campus.

About the Facilitator

Gena Merliss is Coordinator of Monroe Community College’s Teaching and Creativity Center. Gena works with faculty to develop critical reflection in order to improve instruction and student learning. Prior to her current role, Gena taught developmental math and integrated reading and writing as an Assistant Professor. In that position, Gena experimented with many different strategies to help students develop non-cognitive skills and self-awareness. Gena earned a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Bachelor’s in Biological Anthropology from Swarthmore College.

“Depleted.” “Just plain worn out.” As the COVID crisis caused a larger proportion of faculty members to teach remote courses than ever before, accounts of teacher fatigue and feeling overwhelmed are rife. Many professional development opportunities offer advice about the optimum use of technological tools, but most do not focus on ways to make online teaching less exhausting and more sustainable for teachers.

This workshop helps new and experienced online instructors understand the features of online practice that contribute to teacher burnout. Participants learn about specific, actionable strategies for reducing their workload without sacrificing student engagement and success.

Module 1: Before

  • Emergence as a planning principle
  • Reframing “content”
  • Formative versus summative teaching

Module 2: During

  • Managing personality
  • Managing time and timeliness
  • Managing community
  • Managing feedback

Module 3: After

  • Avoiding “Groundhog Day”: Invigorating the iterative
  • Lasting lessons of emergence
  • Practitioner troubleshooting and reflection

About the Facilitator

Dr. Nicole Matos has enjoyed a 20 year career in American higher education as a professor,
administrator, commentator, and consultant. A former community college student herself, she is currently Professor of English at the College of DuPage in suburban Chicago and a particular specialist in the community college sector.

With repeated credits in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and Pedagogy Unbound, and as a former columnist for CHE Vitae, Nicole is widely published on faculty development topics, including improving online and blended instruction, best practices in developmental education, the faculty role in Guided Pathways, and healing relationships between administration and faculty. She is nationally experienced as a keynote speaker, workshop facilitator, communications strategist, and content editor.

Have you ever wished you could change your students’ attitudes toward more positive engagement in their learning? YOU CAN! The secret rests in appreciating that all of us have a profound impact upon the emotional state of the students that we engage with every day. Whether interacting with individuals or groups, the neuroscience is clear: The affective domain powerfully impacts student cognition, persistence, motivation, and performance. During this multidimensional, highly-interactive, experiential, and fun workshop, participants explore ways to promote positive, enthusiastic, and engaged collaboration among students. They also explore how to encourage student learning in a manner that maximizes motivation, a sense of inclusion, and equity within the learning environment!

The workshop includes PowerPoint slides, stories, video, breakout room activities, and opportunities for full group discussions, all of which allow participants to interact with each other and process the information in a fast moving and fun format.

Module One:

  • Demonstrate the impact of emotion on learning.
  • Create positive learning outcomes associated with respectful and affirming relationships.
  • Identify, nurture, and develop talents, rather than focus on weaknesses.

Module Two:

  • Understand how positive emotions expand cognition and creativity.
  • Understand how the affective domain profoundly influences persistence and practice compassionate correction.
  • Apply premises behind the “Growth Mindset” and growing intelligence to our learning environments.

About the Facilitator

David R. Katz III recently retired as the Executive Director of Organizational Development at Mohawk Valley Community College, where he completed a 38-year teaching, coaching, and leadership career. As MVCC’s Executive Director he created, implemented, and oversaw programs aimed at developing a vibrant culture of personal and professional enrichment that reinforced organizational goals focused around student success and empowerment. David was also directly involved in mentoring faculty and staff on pedagogical, motivational, and leadership issues at venues including MVCC, community college campuses throughout America, national educational conferences, and to public and corporate audiences, which is now his primary professional pursuit and passion. David holds an associate’s degree in Liberal Arts from Camden County Community College, a bachelor’s degree from the University of Massachusetts with a major in Political Science and a minor in Secondary Education, and a master’s degree in Political Science from Villanova University.

This highly engaging workshop reveals the intimate connection between empathy, innovation, and collaboration. Participant are led through an evolving series of game scenarios and facilitated discussions that lead to practical insights about building new levels of understanding, creativity, and cooperation in students.

Empathy is an essential skill for all collaboration efforts and is particularly important when collaboration takes place online. This workshop provides participants with the opportunity to practice tangible skills for improving agility, resilience, communication, and collaboration to build better understanding among students.

Module 1

  • Assess empathy inside your classroom setting.
  • Differentiate between cognitive and emotional empathy.
  • Build empathy with remote learners.
  • Resilience and teambuilding.

Module 2

  • Make online interactions more nuanced and empathic.
  • Opportunities for creative problem solving using online interactions.
  • Remote learning strategies that build empathy competencies.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Judith Cardenas’ academic background includes a doctorate in education administration, as well as a doctorate in training and performance improvement. She has completed a variety of postdoctoral trainings, including leadership development at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and human performance improvement at the American Society for Training and Development and Human Capital Analytics. In addition, she holds a certification as a Registered Business Coach, is a Certified Professional for Return on Investment from Villanova University, Certified Neuro Coach in the areas of change, transformation, and agility from Harvard University, and is a Certified Professional in Innovation of Products and Services from MIT.

Dr. Cardenas’ background includes roles in executive management and oversight of large public institutions where her duties entailed leading a $146 million operational budget plus an additional $30 million of federal funds, $10 million foundational endowment, and a 3,000-employee base. In addition to her diverse expertise in higher education, she has created and delivered training to organizations such as World Bank, United Nations, QVC, Inc., Phillips Semiconductor, the United States Navy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and the United States Army.

Instructors set the tone in the classroom by how they approach their work and students. Through their actions, they communicate their character, credibility, and convictions. Today’s students need to be convinced about their instructor’s passion before they put passion into their own work. To be an effective instructor, you must learn how to connect with your students. And while it may seem like some people are just born with the skills to connect with others, anyone can learn how to make every communication an opportunity for a powerful connection. During this workshop, participants learn how to identify and relate to all types of students in a way that increases their influence in virtual and face-to-face environments.

Module 1
Participants learn practices that help develop the crucial skill of connecting with students, including:

  • Finding common ground;
  • Keeping communication simple;
  • Capturing student interest;
  • Inspiring students; and
  • Staying authentic in all their relationships.

Module 2
Participants learn how to:

  • Apply the Law of Awareness to recognize their strengths and limitations.
  • Overcome their shortcomings and clear the path for personal and professional growth.
  • Understand how students are different and how to work with each personality.
  • Build stronger relationships with students, appreciate students’ learning styles, and determine what works well together.
  • Incorporate effective strategies for handling conflict and personality clashes.
  • Develop themself and their students to be their best selves.

By the end of this workshop, participants know or be able to:

  • Build a heartfelt rapport with others.
  • Simplify messages to their most relevant points.
  • Share stories and illustrations to make important points more memorable.
  • Communicate with character, credibility, and conviction.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Nicole Rankine is a certified teacher, speaker, and coach with the John Maxwell Team who founded The COLE Academy of Personal Growth, a professional development company devoted to helping leaders with leadership development, personal growth, and communication. Dr. Rankine travels nationally and internationally devoting her life to helping equip, inspire, and empower students worldwide. Dr. Rankine also serves as an adjunct professor and teaches future public health professionals. She founded Healthy Young People Excel, Inc., a nonprofit devoted to helping youth worldwide develop their soft skills so they can increase their self-esteem to see, own, and achieve their dreams. Dr. Rankine has provided training for government agencies, profit and non-profit organizations, schools, colleges, and universities. She holds a Ph.D. and Master’s degree in Public Health and a Master’s degree in Biology.

During this two-part workshop, participants practice a series of exercises that can be used in remote teaching to engage students in interactive learning and exploration. The workshop helps faculty build a sense of community within the classroom and emphasizes dialogic approaches to teaching the whole student and engaged learning. Participants gain hands-on experience practicing the exercises and leave the workshop ready to bring new approaches back to the classroom. Together with the facilitator, participants consider questions, additional remote teaching ideas, and key take-aways from the two sessions.

  • In Module 1, participants practice and learn the name game, the five-minute poem, and the culture box exercises.
  • In Module 2, participants practice and learn the fishbowl exercise and the concentric circle exercise.

About the Facilitator

Dr. David Schoem, a first-generation college graduate, teaches in the sociology department at the University of Michigan, where he has also held administrative roles as an assistant dean for undergraduate education, assistant vice president for academic and student affairs, and director of the Michigan Community Scholars Program. Dr. Schoem has extensive and successful experience building community inside and outside the classroom using dialogic and whole student teaching methods. He was a co-founder of Michigan’s Program on Intergroup Relations. He is the co-editor of “Teaching the Whole Student: Engaged Learning With Heart, Mind, and Spirit,” “Intergroup Dialogue: Deliberative Democracy in School, College, Community, and Workplace,” and “Multicultural Teaching in the University,” and co-author of “College Knowledge for the Community College Student.”

“Going online” may be our modern purple prose to replace “It was a dark and stormy night.” However, not all is lost for in-person classroom teachers. Much can be gained by learning new strategies and methodologies while transitioning from in-person to virtual learning. The V-i6 are six strategies and methodologies that provide positive, effective teaching experiences focused on six key fundamentals: Animate, Originate, Rejuvenate, Stimulate, Deus Ex Machina, and Tell the Story.

Recognizing that learning is considerably more gratifying when subjects weave together naturally, rather than remain compartmentalized, the V-i6 help teachers rekindle exciting interdisciplinary connections that reveal how all academic subjects work in tandem. The very nature of the V-i6 methods illustrates the ease of transitioning across all teaching modalities, including hybrid, asynchronous, and synchronous online learning environments. This workshop, together with the vast number of free conferencing and online teaching platforms such as Zoom, Eduflow, Top Hat, RCampus, and Thinkific, make “going online” not such purple prose after all!

Module 1: Strategies That Animate and Originate Emergent in Virtual Learning Classes.
Participants learn how to apply the first two V-i6 strategies to energize content that engages student learning in a virtual environment.

  • Apply creative online resources
  • Reach beyond the traditional
  • Bring interdisciplinary connections to life
  • Share resource tools
  • Create unexpected connections and associations

Module 2: Strategies That Rejuvenate and Stimulate in a Virtual Environment.
Participants learn how to apply the next two V-i6 strategies through rejuvenating and stimulating virtual learning activities and examples that recognize the connections between the sciences and the humanities and inspire innate curiosity.

  • Identify captivating and engaging video talks and presentations
  • Become a team learner, shifting from passive viewer to active participant
  • Continuously apply several online resources
  • Create a meeting of minds experience
  • Generate stimulating discussion questions

Module 3: Strategies to Develop Dues Ex Machina Ad Lucem and to Tell The Story.
Participants learn how to apply the last two V-i6 strategies to discover diverse solutions to complex problems and understand that behind every fascinating idea is an illuminating story that is relatable and relevant to modern students.

  • Demonstrate critical thinking activities that reveal creative solutions in a new light
  • Show unorthodox solutions to complex problems
  • Learn to tell the story behind every fascinating idea and discovery
  • Use visualization techniques to become an online actor
  • Share ideas, concepts, strategies, methodologies, and stories to enhance creative thought

About the Facilitator

Stewart BarrPhilosophy, Humanities, and Linguistics, Pima Community College (retired)
Stewart Barr’s unique “Mephistophelian” style of teaching attracted hundreds of students with the desire to not simply learn, but to think differently during his 35-plus years in higher education. He was faculty in and chair of the humanities, philosophy, religion, and speech departments at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. He has been awarded Best of Pima, Outstanding Faculty, and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Faculty of the Year at Pima Community College. In 2006 he was invited to present at the Oxford Roundtable on Religion and the State. He is very active with NISOD, having presented at the organization’s annual conference as a Master Presenter, facilitates conversations for the Monthly Webinar Series, and recently co-authored an article published in Innovation AbstractsHe has also worked across the curricula to develop interdisciplinary courses, including Bio-Medical Ethics in Biology, Philosophy of Law for Business, and the Philosophical Foundations of Science for Physics. He has a B.A. in Philosophy with a minor in Comparative Religion, an M.A. in Oriental Studies with a minor in Linguistics, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy. 

Anthony PituccoPhysics, Mathematics, and Logic, Pima Community College (retired)
Anthony (Tony) Pitucco is best known as the creative educator who injected comedy and playful, over-dramatized acting into his physics lectures at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Tony has been actively involved in higher education for over 40 years. He was faculty in and chair of the physics and astronomy departments at Pima Community College where he also taught mathematics, philosophy, and humanities. Tony holds several awards, including The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Science Arizona Professor of the Year, The Dr. Wayne McGrath Outstanding Faculty Award, the Pima Community College Outstanding Faculty Award, and was selected by USA Today to receive the Teaching Excellence Award Top 50 Professors in the USA. Tony has also authored articles that have appeared in various academic journals such as Astrophysics and Space Science and The Physics Teacher, and has co-authored a children’s textbook titled, The Restaurant at the Beginning of the Universe. He is very active with NISOD, having presented at the organization’s annual conference as a Master Presenter, facilitates conversations for the Monthly Webinar Series, and recently co-authored an article published in Innovation AbstractsIn 2016, Tony was one of the selected faculty to establish and present Best Practices in Teaching Physics in China’s Shunde Province to their university faculty. Tony holds a B.S. in Physics, a M.Ed. in Philosophy and Foundations of Education, a M.S. in Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics in the area of mathematical physics.

Do you ever feel like you are lost in space in your virtual classroom as you look for evidence of intelligent life? Workshop participants examine their own practices and learn what they can do to encourage critical-thinking skills. After watching videos of and participating in hands-on examples of critical-thinking exercises, workshop participants create their own exercises to ensure higher-level critical-thinking in their online students.

In an era in which all faculty members should all be prepared to teach in a virtual environment, we need tools that help students develop the critical-thinking skills necessary to be successful in any classroom or work environment.

The purpose of this three-part workshop is to expose faculty members to best practices designed to increase students’ critical-thinking skills.

Module 1:

  • Clarify the meaning of critical thinking in higher education and employment environments, including the most recent research about employers’ desire for graduates who possess critical-thinking skills.
  • Review and apply the “Valuable Intellectual Traits” identified by the Foundation for Critical Thinking.
  • Learn how to help students create video presentations that demonstrate higher-level thinking.

Module 2:

  • Examine Asynchronous and Synchronous Discussion Question Requirements, Video

Summaries, Online Interview Assignments, and Annotation Stations.

  • Help students develop digital literacy, with an emphasis on research.
  • Learn how to facilitate small group and one-on-one virtual conversations related to more complex course learning outcomes.
  • Develop rubrics to assess higher-level thought.

About the Facilitator

Sean J. Glassberg, the recipient of the 2013 TYCA-Southeast Cowan Award for Teaching Excellence and the 2007 Professor of the Year at Horry Georgetown Technical College, has academic and professional experience, ranging from teaching English at community colleges and universities to training industry and technical professionals to become educators. Sean has been teaching in the community college environment for over 25 years and has employed many digital teaching and learning tools since he started teaching online classes in 2002. Coming from a family of educators has provided Sean with a solid foundation of best-teaching practices. His master’s degree in Special Education and experience with children with disabilities have enabled Sean to respond to a wide spectrum of learners. His passion to help others in and out of the classroom led him to found Racers for Pacers, a non-profit organization with a mission to include children with disabilities in the running community.

Are you seeking more ways to connect with your students? Use your own learning experience and identity development to leverage powerful learning for students. Participants explore adult learning theories, strengths-based approaches, and cultivating a sense of belonging in the classroom. This workshop models interactive learning in the remote environment with an emphasis on practice and application.

Module One: Setting the Stage

  • Identify best practices when working with individual students.
  • Recognize how your own identity impacts students.
  • Leverage your own identity to positively impact students.

Module Two: Getting to Work

  • Foster a sense of belonging.
  • Practice using strengths-based language and cultivating a sense of belonging in student interactions.

Module Three: Taking it Forward

  • Define elements of powerful learning experiences.
  • Identify effective uses of student success theories.
  • Create an action plan to meet students where they are.

About the Facilitator

Gena Merliss is Coordinator of Monroe Community College’s Teaching and Creativity Center. Gena works with faculty to develop critical reflection in order to improve instruction and student learning. Prior to her current role, Gena taught developmental math and integrated reading and writing as an Assistant Professor. In that position, Gena experimented with many different strategies to help students develop non-cognitive skills and self-awareness. Gena earned a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Bachelor’s in Biological Anthropology from Swarthmore College.

Renee Dimino, associate professor and SUNY Guided Pathways project director, works with community colleges across SUNY to support their work implementing guided pathways. In her faculty role, she has worked to redesign developmental education, teaches College Success (COS) courses, oversees the COS program, and coordinates COS adjunct faculty. She values reflective practice and has a passion for student success and faculty development. Renee holds a bachelor’s degree in education from SUNY Geneseo and a master’s degree in education from SUNY Brockport.

During this two-part workshop, participants practice a series of exercises that can be used in remote teaching to engage students in interactive learning and exploration. The workshop helps faculty build a sense of community within the classroom and emphasizes dialogic approaches to teaching the whole student and engaged learning. Participants gain hands-on experience practicing the exercises and leave the workshop ready to bring new approaches back to the classroom. Together with the facilitator, participants consider questions, additional remote teaching ideas, and key take-aways from the two sessions.

  • In Module 1, participants practice and learn the name game, the five-minute poem, and the culture box exercises.
  • In Module 2, participants practice and learn the fishbowl exercise and the concentric circle exercise.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Janet Zadina, Ph.D.

“Powerful!” “Engaging!” “Innovative!” and “Life Changing!” are just a few ways audiences describe presentations by Dr. Janet Zadina. Dr. Zadina is an internationally renowned speaker, consultant, author, and former high school and community college teacher, known for her extraordinary ability to inform, educate, and empower audiences with brain research. Dr. Zadina has made such an impact on the academic community that the Society for Neuroscience honored her with the prestigious 2011 Science Educator Award. This recognition solidified her reputation as a significant contributor to public education and the field of educational neuroscience. Through her transformative, powerful, and entertaining workshops, Dr. Zadina is changing the way teachers, students, and even business professionals understand and use the brain.

Dr. Zadina’s determination to tear down brain myths and build up lives was born from her personal experiences working with dyslexic students. When she learned that a new “window” into the brain was possible with neuroimaging, she knew she had to go back to school and study neuroscience. She earned a Ph.D. in Education while conducting MRI research on neurodevelopmental language disorders at Tulane Medical School. She then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in cognitive neuroscience.

Dr. Zadina bridges the fields of education and neuroscience in her visionary work and the magic of her presentations. Her years of research, writing, and teaching enable her to educate others with science and strategies to transform education. As the founder and CEO of Brain Research and Instruction, she teaches and models best practices in educational neuroscience when presenting keynote speeches and workshops worldwide. She has been honored as a Distinguished Fellow in the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations, among other honors. She is the author of textbooks as well as professional development books, including Multiple Pathways to the Student Brain. She is a co-founder of the Butterfly Project, a pro-bono initiative designed to help educators who have experienced natural disasters.

The recent pandemic has shaken the norms of instructors and students. Instructors have had to rapidly adapt to previously untapped technology that would normally be placed in the “try later” category. This technology is key to establishing new comfort zones in online learning and providing effective instruction to students. This workshop series provides instructional tools that help participants create their desired online or blended learning environment.

Module 1: I Didn’t Know It Could Do That!
This module covers the most useful features of virtual meeting platforms for blended and virtual environments, and is designed to showcase features that will help instructors manage synchronous and asynchronous learning environments.

  • Experience the most useful features found in Zoom, Cisco WebX, Google Meet, and Microsoft teams for teaching and learning in blended and virtual environments.
  • Learn how to integrate third-party apps into the above virtual meeting platforms.

Module 2: Blended, Not Boring
Considering the increased amount of time students are looking at digital screens during this pandemic, it may be harder than normal to catch their attention. This module demonstrates how to keep students engaged with digital content and shows participants how they can inspire meaningful collaboration.

  • Use media enhancements to give your course content more personality.
  • Practice collaboration techniques useful for blended and virtual environments.

Modules 3: Streamline Teaching, Learning, and Assessment With E-Portfolios
The American Association of Colleges and Universities recommends e-portfolio learning as a high-impact practice. E-portfolios provide an opportunity for students to make deeper connections with content in virtual and blended environments.

  • Become familiar with free e-portfolio platforms, work examples, and sample templates.
  • Learn how to select the e-portfolio pedagogical approach that fits your teaching style or course outcomes.
  • Learn how to align assignments, tasks, and labs with e-portfolios.

About the Facilitator

Marcus E.R. Williams is an educator who has worked and taught in K-12 and postsecondary settings for more than 15 years. Currently, he is the content leader for economics and teaches AP Microeconomics and Macroeconomics at Newton High School in Covington, GA. He was voted the “top teacher”—a distinguished honor—by the top ten graduating seniors in the class of 2018. Mr. Williams is well known for his teaching style and for integrating technology into his classes, conference sessions, and workshops. He has presented at numerous conferences, including NISOD’s annual conference. He also works as a consultant, training educators on how to employ digital learning strategies. Mr. Williams earned his B.S. from Clark Atlanta University, M.A.T. from LaGrange College, and his Ed.S. from Columbus State University. His goal is to inspire, educate, and build capacity.

With the advent of new technologies that make teaching via live, online (a.k.a. synchronous) sessions easier and more accessible, learning how to facilitate these types of sessions is a critical skill for all educators. Most of us have attended an online class, presentation, or webinar that was just plain boring. During this workshop, participants do some major boredom-busting! Are you ready to create and facilitate sessions that leave your learners wanting more? Do you want to boost your online presence? Are you ready to harness the power of learning sciences to create humanized, fun, and positive online classes? This three-part workshop provides you with the skills needed to become an excellent online facilitator. Each module includes opportunities to connect with the facilitators and your peers to ask questions and complete a hands-on activities. This workshop will benefit anyone who wants to facilitate a great online learning experience, whether for a class, office hours, meetings, or conference presentations.

Module 1: Starting Strong

  • The basics and definitions of online sessions.
  • The pros and cons of synchronous and asynchronous approaches.
  • Setting instructional goals.
  • Selecting a platform.
  • The critical first five minutes.
  • Activating prior knowledge.
  • Promoting your session.
  • Security tips and avoiding intruders.

Module 2: Attention and Engagement

  • The role of attention in learning.
  • Getting and keeping learners' attention.
  • Why you shouldn't require on-camera presence.
  • Teaching trauma-aware sessions.
  • Developing storytelling skills.
  • Humanizing online learning.
  • Slide design strategies.
  • Accessibility best practices.

Module 3: Creating a Detailed Action Plan for Live, Online Session Success

  • How will you know they learned? Creating an assessment plan.
  • Activating the power of recall using a KWL activity.
  • Using Google Jamboard and Google Docs.
  • Avoiding common online facilitating mistakes.
  • Time management of your session.
  • Managing presentation fears.
  • Troubleshooting tech issues.
  • Creating and sharing your action plan.

About the Facilitator

Karen Costa

Karen Costa is a faculty development facilitator specializing in online pedagogy and trauma-aware higher education. Karen loves leading faculty learners through fun, interactive, and supportive professional development experiences. Karen’s first book, 99 Tips for Creating Simple and Sustainable Educational Videos (Stylus, April 2020), focuses on helping faculty and teachers make creative use of videos in their classrooms. Karen is involved in various faculty development initiatives, including facilitating for the Online Learning Consortium and Online Learning Toolkit. She spent four years as a regular writer for Women in Higher Education. Her writing has also appeared in Inside Higher EducationThe Philadelphia InquirerOn Being, and Faculty Focus. Learn more about Karen's work through her website, 100faculty.com.

Clea Mahoney

Clea Mahoney has over four years of webinar facilitation experience and is proud to work for New York University as an Instructional Technologist and faculty training lead for academic technologies. She also teaches in the (fully online) M.S. Professional Writing program at NYU's School of Professional Studies. Clea has developed and delivered a multitude of engaging and interactive one-hour webinars for faculty, administrative staff, and colleagues, each session focusing on a specific set of goals depending on audience needs. Clea graduated with honors from Drew University (Bachelor of Arts in French) and from Drexel University (Master of Science in Library and Information Science).

Teaching and learning in the era of COVID is awkward (“I didn’t realize my video wasn’t on.”); apologetic (“I’m sorry, I couldn’t quite hear that through your mask.”); and elegiac (“Normally, I would do it this way, and maybe when all this is over…”). It is emotionally overwhelming serving students—at a social distance—who are often in need of help more than ever before.

When Maslow’s hierarchy feels like a layer cake missing several layers, it can be difficult for faculty to determine: “What exactly should teaching provide right now?”; “What am I supposed to aim for?”; and “What meaningful things can I give?”

This workshop offers instructors a concrete pyramid to rebuild by focusing on offerings of presence, surety, and joy. Participants engage in refocusing their own gifts of teaching (for supporting students) and teaching gifts (for nurturing their own practice), even in difficult times.

Module 1: My Pyramid

  • A pedagogy of presence
  • Surety as interpersonal safety
  • Joy that acknowledges pain

Module 2: Your Pyramid - Part 1

  • Finding strengths for the apocalypse
  • Your pyramid in creation

Module 3: Your Pyramid - Part 2

  • Your pyramid in practice
  • Your pyramid in relation

About the Facilitator

Dr. Nicole Matos has enjoyed a 20 year career in American higher education as a professor,
administrator, commentator, and consultant. A former community college student herself, she is currently Professor of English at the College of DuPage in suburban Chicago and a particular specialist in the community college sector.

With repeated credits in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and Pedagogy Unbound, and as a former columnist for CHE Vitae, Nicole is widely published on faculty development topics, including improving online and blended instruction, best practices in developmental education, the faculty role in Guided Pathways, and healing relationships between administration and faculty. She is nationally experienced as a keynote speaker, workshop facilitator, communications strategist, and content editor.

Today’s changing world is influencing how we teach and engage students. It’s more than just moving from a face-to-face to virtual format; our changing world has shifted the entire learning experience. The need to rapidly innovate has never been greater, but finding implementable solutions in a remote environment can be challenging.

What if we could co-create a more powerful learning experience by applying innovation tools and techniques used by technology leaders such as Google and Apple? Participants in this workshop innovate and design solutions and recreate learning experiences by using a proven learning technique grounded in the principles of human-centered design. Prior to the workshop, each participant receives a training video and handout outlining the power of design thinking.

Module 1

  • Gain awareness of design thinking fundamentals.
  • Learn the power of framing the exact challenge.
  • Design a creative collaboration environment.
  • Create the student experience journey map.
  • Create a vibrant research plan.
  • Form insights and redirect the Innovation Challenge.

Module 2

  • Understand the key steps to rapid ideation.
  • Measure the power of a new idea.
  • Create mock-ups for new services and approaches.
  • Learn prototyping techniques.
  • Build your implementation plan and creating a video pitch to share your ideas.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Judith Cardenas’ academic background includes a doctorate in education administration, as well as a doctorate in training and performance improvement. She has completed a variety of postdoctoral trainings, including leadership development at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and human performance improvement at the American Society for Training and Development and Human Capital Analytics. In addition, she holds a certification as a Registered Business Coach, is a Certified Professional for Return on Investment from Villanova University, Certified Neuro Coach in the areas of change, transformation, and agility from Harvard University, and is a Certified Professional in Innovation of Products and Services from MIT.

Dr. Cardenas’ background includes roles in executive management and oversight of large public institutions where her duties entailed leading a $146 million operational budget plus an additional $30 million of federal funds, $10 million foundational endowment, and a 3,000-employee base. In addition to her diverse expertise in higher education, she has created and delivered training to organizations such as World Bank, United Nations, QVC, Inc., Phillips Semiconductor, the United States Navy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and the United States Army.

This workshop explores a range of innovative scheduling practices and strategies that provide greater clarity, consistency, and stability for students and faculty alike, particularly in times of uncertainty and institutional disruption. At its core, strategic scheduling seeks to bring campus stakeholders together to ensure that students have access to the courses they need for degree completion and advancement. While that sounds simple enough, in reality, scheduling remains a complex, highly decentralized process at most institutions, one often driven by operational needs rather than strategic or pedagogical priorities.

Building on real-world examples from multiple institutional contexts, this workshop offers faculty members, program directors, department chairs, and other academic leaders concrete, yet creative solutions for implementing strategic scheduling practices. Participants explore the many benefits of strategic scheduling, including increased flexibility for faculty and students, improved retention and completion rates, greater efficiency using resources, enrollment growth, and increased levels of engagement. Participants complete a number of activities designed to help them develop and implement various scheduling strategies in ways that fit their particular institutional needs and priorities.

The workshop also considers a range of topics relevant to institutions hoping to develop course offerings that can easily pivot in response to COVID-19, including compressed, modular, and accelerated term lengths, as well as hybrid and high-flex models. A variety of innovative student support structures are also considered, including using “completion camps” and “pass-pause-reset” contracts.

Because effective strategic scheduling requires the engagement of a wide range of campus stakeholders—including faculty, department chairs, academic deans, advisors, and operational and support staff from multiple areas—all are welcome to participate! No previous experience with strategic scheduling processes or practices is required.

Module 1: Introduction to Strategic Scheduling and Key Principles
This module provides participants with an overview of strategic scheduling, including the main benefits of such initiatives, as well as the fundamental tools needed to jump-start the process at their own institutions. Discussed are real-world examples of scheduling strategies in action, including specific ways such strategies can be applied at the course, department, and college levels. At the end of the session, participants receive a digital copy of The Strategic Scheduling Playbook, along with suggestions for next steps they can implement immediately.

Module 1 is organized into three units:

  • Overview of strategic scheduling
    • Definitions, benefits, and key metrics
  • Strategic scheduling in action
    • Examples of cross-disciplinary and collegewide approaches
  • Laying the foundations for strategic scheduling at your institution

Note: Participants attending Module 2 will be provided additional optional activities they can complete before the next session to maximize their experience.

Module 2: The Strategic Scheduling Playbook
Building on principles introduced the previous week, this module focuses on reviewing and applying a range of strategies outlined in The Strategic Scheduling Playbook. Participants who completed the optional activities provided in Module 1 have an opportunity to share their examples and receive feedback. Participants also examine the issue of course sequencing in greater depth, as well as the role that alternative term lengths and modalities play in enhancing the overall mix of campus offerings. They also consider how strategic scheduling can improve a variety of “pivots” colleges must consider in the face of changing conditions—particularly in the era of COVID.

Module 2 is organized into four units:

  • Overview and highlights from The Strategic Scheduling Playbook
  • Moves, tools, and best practices across institutional contexts
  • Course sequences and pathways
    • Alternative term lengths and modalities
  • Preparing for the unexpected
    • Scheduling abbreviated-terms
    • Completion camps
    • Accelerated models

Note: Participants attending Module 3 are encouraged to complete an optional planning activity designed to maximize their experience in the final module.

Module 3: Implementing a Campuswide Strategic Scheduling Plan
This culminating module focuses on developing and sustaining a strategic campuswide scheduling plan, and touches on some of the larger institutional challenges and opportunities for such work. Because so many different college stakeholders have a hand in schedule development, participants explore the importance of cross-functional teams in guiding such efforts. They also explore how schedule development can be holistically integrated into other critical college processes, including strategic enrollment management, new program development, program and collegewide assessment, institutional planning, and budgeting. Participants who completed the optional planning activity from Module 2 have an opportunity to receive feedback on their drafts.

Module 3 is organized into three units:

  • Developing and launching a strategic scheduling plan
  • Creating a strategic scheduling team
  • Identifying priorities and assessing progress

About the Facilitator

Dr. Sheldon Walcher
Sheldon Walcher has over 25 years of teaching and administrative experience in a wide range of higher education settings. He earned his MFA in creative writing Penn State University, and worked as an adjunct instructor at Salt Lake Community College while completing his PhD in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Utah. He spent a year as a visiting professor in the Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics Department at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville before joining the faculty at the University of Southern Mississippi, where he also served as director of composition. He was named founding director of the Writing Program at Roosevelt University in Chicago, where he  taught graduate courses in composition theory, digital rhetoric, and pedagogy.

After deciding to transition to full-time administration, Sheldon completed the MS in the Higher Education Administration and Policy at Northwestern University, where he also served as a Senior Research Fellow at the Searle Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning. He became Associate Dean of English and Academic ESL at College of DuPage, then Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at Kankakee Community College, before assuming his current role as Dean of Communication Arts, Humanities, and Fine Arts at the College of Lake County in suburban Chicago.

Are you feeling a sense of urgency to become an expert in equitable, inclusive instruction that amplifies students’ voices and builds on the strengths of learners from every background? Are you motivated to transition your in-person classes to distance education classes that incorporate high-leverage online moves? This series of three interactive Teachin’ It! modules offers practical strategies for delivering high-quality online instruction that disrupts larger systemic inequities at the classroom level. Participants receive strategies they can use to foster an online classroom where students from every background feel safe to experiment, take risks, and make mistakes; invited to communicate their unique approaches and perspectives; and free to develop their own identities as powerful lifelong learners. There is also a focus on synchronous and asynchronous learning using Zoom, iPhones, iPads, Google Docs, PlayPosit, and Canvas.

Prior to each module, participants receive excerpts from Teachin’ It! Breakout Moves That Break Down Barriers for Community College Students, written by Dr. Felicia Darling, and a list of equity moves. In addition, participants will be sent a pre-workshop survey that asks what they hope to get out of each module.

Module 1: Five Breakout Moves That Build a Community of Powerful Learners in Online Classes

  • Equalize the balance of power in the classroom
  • Create inclusive student networks
  • Co-develop classroom norms with students
  • Use high-leverage tasks and moves that include more students
  • Ensure equitable access to resources for all students

Module 2: Five Ways to Frame Your Instructional Moves With an Equity Lens in Online Classes 

  • Frame growth mindset strategies with an equity lens
  • Make grading, assignments, and assessments equitable
  • Give feedback that promotes equity
  • Make group work and projects more equitable
  • Practice equity moves beyond the classroom

Module 3: Five Strategies to Ensure Every Student’s Voice is Heard in Online Classes

  • Launch a class that values every student’s voice
  • Employ high-leverage universal design moves
  • Bolster students’ social capital
  • Facilitate inclusive discussions  
  • Amplify the voices of all students in group work

About the Facilitator

Felicia Darling is an instructor, author, researcher, teacher educator, and speaker who would like to see every person actualize their greatest human potential. She is a first-generation college student who has taught mathematics and education courses for 30 years at the secondary, undergraduate, and graduate levels. She possesses a PhD in Math Education from Stanford University and is a Fulbright Scholar. Currently, Felicia teaches math at Santa Rosa Junior College in California. Felicia is the author of Teachin’ It! Breakout Moves That Break Down Barriers for Community College Students. Teachin’ It! offers practical ideas that help instructors bolster the success of students seeking to attain their educational dreams–especially historically underrepresented students. Her work has been highlighted in The Chronicle of Higher EdInside Higher EdJournal of Mathematics and Culture, and North East Public Radio.

Mental health issues are becoming a crisis in education due to the effects of the pandemic. In addition to impairing physical health, anxiety, stress, and trauma make it harder for students to do higher-order thinking, focus, regulate emotions, get to class, budget time, and complete projects. But you can help! Workshop participants learn how to reduce these obstacles to achievement, whether they’re teaching in-person or online.

During this workshop, participants learn:

  • The many ways anxiety, stress, and trauma affect academic performance.
  • Research-based strategies for participants and students that:
    • Reduce anxiety and stress in the moment,
    • Help prevent physiological stress reactions,
    • Increase coping self-efficacy and resilience,
    • Create a brain/body/mindset for higher performance, and
    • Create a trauma-sensitive learning environment.
  • How to create an action plan for their students.

You have to set the table before you can eat. Participate in this engaging and interactive workshop and learn how to set the table to facilitate increased learning for their students.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Janet Zadina

“Powerful!” “Engaging!” “Innovative!” and “Life Changing!” are just a few ways audiences describe presentations by Dr. Janet Zadina. Dr. Zadina is an internationally renowned speaker, consultant, author, and former high school and community college teacher, known for her extraordinary ability to inform, educate, and empower audiences with brain research. Dr. Zadina has made such an impact on the academic community that the Society for Neuroscience honored her with the prestigious 2011 Science Educator Award. This recognition solidified her reputation as a significant contributor to public education and the field of educational neuroscience. Through her transformative, powerful, and entertaining workshops, Dr. Zadina is changing the way teachers, students, and even business professionals understand and use the brain.

Dr. Zadina’s determination to tear down brain myths and build up lives was born from her personal experiences working with dyslexic students. When she learned that a new “window” into the brain was possible with neuroimaging, she knew she had to go back to school and study neuroscience. She earned a Ph.D. in Education while conducting MRI research on neurodevelopmental language disorders at Tulane Medical School. She then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in cognitive neuroscience.

Dr. Zadina bridges the fields of education and neuroscience in her visionary work and the magic of her presentations. Her years of research, writing, and teaching enable her to educate others with science and strategies to transform education. As the founder and CEO of Brain Research and Instruction, she teaches and models best practices in educational neuroscience when presenting keynote speeches and workshops worldwide. She has been honored as a Distinguished Fellow in the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations, among other honors. She is the author of textbooks as well as professional development books, including Multiple Pathways to the Student Brain. She is a co-founder of the Butterfly Project, a pro-bono initiative designed to help educators who have experienced natural disasters.

One size does not fit all! Understanding human behavior is key to designing and creating habits for student success. During this workshop, participants focus on behaviors that have the biggest impact on creating successful learning experiences. Participants learn and apply a simple and empirically proven method of behavior change that creates a powerful learning environment. They also learn the power of habit design and a step-by-step process for creating tiny habits. In addition, participants create actionable habit recipes applicable to students, faculty, and staff.

The workshop is based on Dr. BJ Fogg’s Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything, which has recently been named by Amazon editors as the number one book on leadership and business. All participants receive a complimentary five-day Tiny Habits course, which includes a daily email from a trained and certified Tiny Habits Coach.

Module 1

  • Learn the power of tiny habits.
  • Explore habits and emotions.
  • Learn two behavior maxims that influence change.
  • Learn and apply the Fogg Behavior Model.
  • Differentiate between aspirations and behaviors.
  • Learn and apply the Tiny Habit recipe.

Module 2

  • Learn and apply a behavior-focus mapping technique.
  • Design Tiny Habits for your students.
  • Learn about pearl habits for everyday students
  • Design pearl habits.

About the Facilitator

Dr. Judith Cardenas’ academic background includes a doctorate in education administration, as well as a doctorate in training and performance improvement. She has completed a variety of postdoctoral trainings, including leadership development at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and human performance improvement at the American Society for Training and Development and Human Capital Analytics. In addition, she holds a certification as a Registered Business Coach, is a Certified Professional for Return on Investment from Villanova University, Certified Neuro Coach in the areas of change, transformation, and agility from Harvard University, and is a Certified Professional in Innovation of Products and Services from MIT.

Dr. Cardenas’ background includes roles in executive management and oversight of large public institutions where her duties entailed leading a $146 million operational budget plus an additional $30 million of federal funds, $10 million foundational endowment, and a 3,000-employee base. In addition to her diverse expertise in higher education, she has created and delivered training to organizations such as World Bank, United Nations, QVC, Inc., Phillips Semiconductor, the United States Navy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and the United States Army.