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PRELIMINARY PROGRAM - Sessions by Title

Sessions presented are subject to change.
Keynote
Session
Breakout
Session
Roundtable
Discussion
Preconference
Seminar
Administrator
Series

"Hello, Are You Even There?" Why Am I Teaching to a Class Full of Black Boxes?

Have you been teaching to no one and everyone at the same time in Zoomtopia? This discussion dives into what students say about turning their cameras off on Zoom, why they don't use virtual backgrounds, and other synchronous preferences. In addition, we’ll discuss what other practices students indicated their instructors used on and offline that were helpful for their learning. Based on this student feedback, we’ll also brainstorm a list of takeaways.

Elizabeth Muckensturm, Senior Lecturer, Communication, Coastal Carolina University

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

"Train-ing" Day: Conducting a Skills Fair to Keep Students on Track

A non-exhaustive literature review revealed skills fairs as a potential intervention to improve and validate nursing student engagement, retention, confidence, and competence in simulated clinical skills. The resulting simulation incorporated evidence-based components, including autonomy and decision-making, with multisensory techniques such as music and themed décor. Our connection with the Santa Fe Railroad provided the opportunity to use “Train-ing,” representing stations throughout the themed simulation lab.

Nancy Eaton, Nursing Simulation Lab Coordinator, Nursing, Temple College

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

A Beginner's Guide to a Collegewide OER Implementation

Open Education Resources (OER) provide opportunities for institutions and students to save significant amounts of money. Beyond the money, OER provide teachers with the opportunity to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion. This session, which documents successes and shares lessons learned, provides leaders with a framework for establishing OER at an institutional level, including methods for planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating the OER strategy.

Deborah Bowles, Coordinator, Professional Development, Prince George's Community College; Michael Smith, Chair, Technology, Engineering and Construction, Prince George's Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

A Comprehensive Approach to CCRS While Implementing MD Labor Framework and CASAS GOALS

This session shares strategies that increased college and career readiness skills in Harford Community College’s ABE/GED program. The strategies include pre-assessment orientation, student contact, rubrics, conferences, and establishing curriculum changes to correlate CASAS GOALS and GED® standards by targeting and documenting specific content area needs. The implementation of these strategies is based on adult education research and best practices.

Rhonda Davis, Transition Specialist, Adult Literacy, Harford Community College; Beth Johnson, Intake and Assessment Specialist, Adult Literacy, Harford Community College; Jessie Thompson, Instructional Specialist, Adult Literacy, Harford Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

A Professor, a Tutor, and a Student Walk Into a Bar

This session examines the Hot Spot tutoring model, which features collaborative work between professors, tutors, and students to meet students where they are. This presentation explains the history of the model, how it has evolved since its inception, and how it is currently implemented. Also shared is the model’s success as demonstrated by quantitative and qualitative data from a five-year survey.

Shannon Hausinger, Director, Student Learning Resource Center, Lone Star College System - University Park; Kitty Jordan, Manager, Academic Coaching, Lone Star College - University Park

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Achieving Excellence Through Opportunities for Graduate Education

Sponsored by faculty who lead a nationally recognized, award-winning Ed.D. program in Community College Leadership at N.C. State University, this presentation explores pathways to success for graduate degree completion among community college educators. Student-centered approaches to delivering graduate education in alignment with the Aspen Institute's mission to advance leadership in community colleges are the focus of this discussion. We invite you to learn more about what N.C. State University has to offer.

Carrol Warren, Faculty Scholar, Community College Leadership, North Carolina State University Community College Leadership Program

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Sponsor Logo image
Active Learning While Physically Distancing

We are all searching for practical strategies to make our teaching engaging and impactful. Join us to take the common teaching goals of face-to-face, active-learning techniques and achieve those same goals while physically distancing. Also discussed are corresponding approaches of engaging strategies in online-synchronous, online-asynchronous, and face-to-face physically distanced courses.

Samra Culum, Professor, Education, College of Southern Idaho; Scott Rogers, Professor, Liberal Arts and Wellness, College of Southern Idaho; Bethany White, Instructional Designer, Learning Management System, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Adjunct Faculty Development + Engagement = Student Persistence

Data suggests when there is an investment in faculty development, students persist. Participants explore a framework that can be adapted in several institutional settings to promote growth, purpose, and belonging. From recruitment to ongoing development, discover how the Office of Adjunct Faculty Support at College of DuPage invests in adjunct faculty to promote success in the classroom and beyond.

Jennifer Propp, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Kate Szetela, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Sonia Watson, Assistant Dean, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

AIM HIGH! Disruptive Innovation in Education Through Character Building

A post-covid culture of caring begins with character. But seriously folks, improving educational outcomes has never been more important, especially for FTICs and POC. This discussion explores approaches to non-cognitive skill assessment and leans into the research indicating a robust relationship between building character and success in college. Infuse your curriculum with the character strengths of hope, gratitude, teamwork, social intelligence, and self-regulation. Improve your success rates and contribute to a better world.

Jeannette Sullivan, Professor, Freshman Success, Palm Beach State College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Aligning Access: The Impact and Role of Higher Education for Carceral Students

College programs in carceral institutions transform the lives of incarcerate individuals, as well as their families and communities. For community colleges especially, carceral programs are a way to promote equity by ensuring access for students and responding to the overlooked needs of justice-involved students. This session discusses the past, present, and future opportunities provided through program partnerships, focusing specifically on solutions to technology barriers.

Lisa Jordan, Coordinator, Campus Within Walls, Southside Virginia Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

All About Class Culture: Simple Tech Tools to Create Vibrant Learning Environments

What does an engaging class culture look like? We all want to create a vibrant learning environment, but getting there can sometimes be elusive. During this discussion, learn how to use technology to create dynamic, engaging lessons, and discover activities that promote a class culture of creativity and academic achievement.

Leslie A. Arriaga, Adjunct Professor, Graphic Design and Information Technology, Estrella Mountain Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Are You Up for the Quality Design Challenge?

How do you incentivize 200 full-time and adjunct faculty to elevate their online course designs to the next level? Come learn how a very large community college district developed the Quality Design Challenges to support faculty in such an endeavor.

Amy Gates, Instructional Designer, Online and Hybrid Learning, Alamo Colleges District/Alamo Colleges Online; Rudy Lopez, Team Lead, Instructional Designer, Alamo Colleges District/Alamo Colleges Online

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

At-Home Lab Kits for Online Science Courses

During this session, learn how Minnesota State College Southeast has found a cost-effective way to provide fully online anatomy and physiology students with home dissection materials and rental kits that include a complete set of life-size bones. You’ll gain practical information about purchasing and assembling kits along with strategies for establishing lab partners for distance students. Although the focus is on anatomy and physiology, the general concept can be adapted to other disciplines.

Elizabeth Micheel, Faculty, Biology, Minnesota State College Southeast

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Attacks on Academic Freedom and Shared Governance at the Twenty-First Century Community College

Academic freedom and shared governance are under attack at American colleges and universities. Participants discuss the established professional standards of academic freedom and shared governance, identify the threats to these building blocks of academic excellence, and consider responses to these threats by college faculty and staff.

James Klein, Professor, History, Del Mar College; Teresa Klein, Associate Professor, Psychology, Del Mar College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Be Cool, But Not a Gang: Let's Celebrate U.S. Constitution and Citizenship Day

While neglecting the challenges of our time, it's been lamented that politics have become gang-like and retributive. Celebrating U.S. Constitution and Citizenship Day on September 17th offers great opportunities for community learning and civil dialogue in our polarized political world. It is possible to talk about present policy challenges while honoring our political past. The reds, blues, purples, and all the colors can come together to celebrate. (Inspired by Kool and the Gang’s Celebration.)

Albert Celoza, Faculty, Liberal Arts, Phoenix College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Best Practices for Engaging 21st Century Learners

Participate in this fun and interactive session designed for educators who want to connect with the next wave of 21st century students and examine the struggles they face moving from an interactive culture to a one-size-fits-all classroom. Participants leave with a clear understanding about modern students and how to engage them in a variety of classroom settings by implementing effective techniques in the classroom.

Micki Ewens, Academic Director, Mathematics, Spartanburg Community College; Amy Moore, Academic Director, Technology and Training, Spartanburg Community College; Linda Schmidt, Chair, Mathematics, Spartanburg Community College

Takes place on Saturday, 1–4 p.m. (Central Daylight Time)

Better Together in the New Possible

This conversation pulls together the day’s dialogs and explores the importance of inclusive and expansive internal work to build our teams capacity to innovate and lead change. Moreover, we’ll open the aperture to discuss how we build early learning, K-12, university, private college, corporate, civic, and political partnerships to power this work and scale our impact.

Gerardo de los Santos, Director, Community College Partnerships, Western Govenors University; Mark Milliron, Senior Vice President & Executive Dean of the Teachers College, Western Governors University

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Between the World and Me: Collaboration on the Common Read Through the Lens of Equity

This session presents the development of a first-time Common Read as a campus-wide initiative during the pandemic. It focuses on an interdisciplinary and culturally-responsive pedagogical approach and the blending of administrative support, scholarship, and community resources to cultivate student success.

Maureen Ellis-Davis, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Bergen Community College; Brock Fisher, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Bergen Community College; Carol Miele, Professor, ESL and World Languages, Bergen Community College; Lou Ethel Roliston, Chair, English, Bergen Community College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Bridge That Gap! College Readiness for All!

Many learners enter our classrooms unprepared for the work that lies ahead for them. So how do we take students from where they are to where they need to be? This discussion provides data from the facilitator’s recent dissertation study regarding college readiness and shares strategies that can be employed to increase student success.

Chelsea Davis-Bibb, Associate Professor, English, Lone Star College-University Park

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Bridging Disciplines: Integrating Humanities and Criminal Justice

Interdisciplinary educational opportunities have been proven to benefit students and faculty by providing broader perspectives, stronger problem-solving skills, and greater interpersonal engagement. During this session, learn about the implementation of an NEH Humanities Connections grant that created learning communities and contextualized courses using English, philosophy, and religion to enrich a criminal justice program. Participants develop new integrative learning opportunities and learn how to foster cross-disciplinary partnerships.

Eileen Fitzgerald, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Developmental English and Learning Communities, Bergen Community College; Richard Kuiters, Professor and Academic Department Chair, Criminal Justice, Legal Studies, and Homeland Security, Bergen Community College; Kevin Olbrys, Assistant Professor and Academic Department Chair, Philosophy and Religion, Bergen Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Bridging the Humanities From the Classroom to the Profession

During this session, Miami Dade College professors share how they bridge the humanities from the classroom to the profession for their undergraduate students with the support of the Humanities Edge program. These opportunities include faculty-supervised paid internships on campus, paid peer-writing mentorship positions, and undergraduate research. Participants explore strategies to bridge their own classrooms to the profession at their institutions.

Ildiko Barsony, Faculty, English, Miami Dade College; Taurie Gittings Wheeler, Faculty, Humanities, Miami Dade College; David Heredia, Faculty, English, Miami Dade College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Bringing Instruction to the Student: Providing Equitable Program and Course Attendance Options From the Student Perspective

Adult learners often balance many obligations. Lost opportunities may be the outcome of this juggling act, which can force adult learners to choose between completing their education or meeting their personal obligations. Flexible course modalities may help mitigate this choice by meeting the needs of individual students without compromising the quality of instruction. This presentation shares how certificate, diploma, and degree programs can be offered with equity and fidelity, regardless of modality.

Candice Freeman, Chair, Medical Laboratory Technology, Fayetteville Technical Community College; Michelle Walden, Dean, Allied Health Science, Fayetteville Technical Community College; Sandra Walker, Chair, Dental Assisting, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Bringing Redhat Training to Transitioning Military Members

Fayetteville Technical Community College has partnered with Redhat to bring training opportunities to transitioning military members. The presenters discuss how this and other partnerships with industry leaders such as Cisco and CompTIA continue to bridge the gap between skills, education, and the workforce and labor market demands of employers.

Rhiannon Holley, Instructor, Systems Security and Analysis, Fayetteville Technical Community College; Tenette Prevatte, Academic Dean, Computer and Information Technology, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Building an Academic Division and Professional Organization Mentorship Program: Program Model, Easy Implementation, and Sustainability Steps

A successful academic division and professional organization mentorship program leads to engagement, professional networking, and exploration of career opportunities for students. Join this session to learn easy design steps, captivating program details, and technical shortcuts to ensure efficient long-term mentorship program execution, maintenance, and sustainability. Prepare for the challenges facing CTE programs by establishing a mentorship program that leads to student engagement and retention while assisting students transition from student to professional.

Nan Abbot, Adjunct Professor and Internship Coordinator, Healthcare Information Systems, Johnson County Community College; Lori Brooks, Chair and Associate Professor, Healthcare Information Systems, Johnson County Community College; Amanda Kraus, Chair and Associate Professor, Medical Information and Revenue Management, Johnson County Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Building Partnerships and Stakeholder Networks to Support Equity and Student Success

There is an increasing focus on supporting student success through networks and partnerships between colleges, nonprofits, government, employers, and other key stakeholders, particularly when addressing opportunity gaps and inequitable outcomes for students of color. In this session, nonprofit leaders, a former academic dean, and other stakeholders engage participants in discussing processes for building authentic internal and external partnerships and addressing the challenges that arise in maintaining them.

Max Altman, Director, Research and Policy, Southern Education Foundation; Christine Barrow, Director, Postsecondary Attainment, Education Strategy Group; Meagan Crowe, Senior Research and Policy Analyst, Southern Education Foundation; Richard Williams, Engineering Manager, Engineering and Technology, Northrop Grumman Corporation

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Can a Robot Write My Paper? Commercial AI Software and Its Impact on Written Assignments

Sudowrite is an example of a commercial interface for GPT-3, the multi-billion-dollar natural language AI model. Participants discuss how this product and others such as new, high-end online grammar checkers can assist students with written assignments. For those students willing to pay for this level of artificial assistance, how much can these new programs help? What should professors and others be aware of as this powerful new software comes into its own?

John Rice, Instructional Technologist, Information Technology, Blinn College District

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Caring Campus: The Power of Creating Relationships to Support Student Success

Students come where they are welcome and stay where they feel cared about. Caring Campus is based on decades of research documenting that students who feel cared for and connected to their college are more likely to achieve their educational goals. Learn how professional staff are committing to easy, low-cost behaviors that bring the human component to student interactions, improve student success, and increase job satisfaction in over 70 colleges around the country.

Jo-Carol Fabianke, Coach, Caring Campus, Institute for Evidence-Based Change; Jordan Horowitz, Chief Operating Officer, Institute for Evidence-Based Change; Ken Sherwood, Caring Campus Coach, Institute for Evidence-Based Change

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Classroom Management: Preventative Strategies and Practical Solutions

Consistently establishing and managing student expectations and behaviors to ensure a productive learning environment are among the most critical issues faced by novice and experienced teachers. During this session, participants move beyond identifying classroom problems and suggest preventative strategies and practical solutions to the most common classroom management problems.

Chelsea Biggerstaff, Interim Manager, Faculty Development, Austin Community College District; Marian Moore, Instructional Designer, Austin Community College District

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Coaching for Change: Building Leadership Capacity to Implement and Scale Pathways Reforms

Learn how executive coaching and leadership development have been used to build capacity for institutional leaders to effectively lead organizational change and improve student learning outcomes in an NSF-funded project about scaling pathways reforms. A variety of capacity building methods are covered, including coaching, change management tenets, team priority setting, and consensus building. The importance of effective communication strategies to guide organizational change in complex reform efforts are highlighted.

Stephanie Delaney, Vice President, Instruction, Renton Technical College; Margo Keys, Administrator Coach, WestEd/Carnegie Math Pathways

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Collaborate and Cooperate: Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies in a Geo-Cultural World

As a result of the global pandemic, various inequities and social injustices existing in education have been exposed. Therefore, it is incumbent upon educators to adopt culturally responsive teaching strategies to cultivate diversity, equity, and inclusion. The presenters share several holistic strategies regarding the selection of content, instructional methods, and assessment—all essential elements to create a geo-culturally sensitive learning environment. Virtual exchange projects that focus on developing geo-cultural competencies through student engagement are shared.

Catherine Roche, Faculty, Business, Rockland Community College; Patricia Szobonya, Program Director, Legal and Criminal Justice Studies and Corporate Homeland Security, Rockland Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Collaborating With Library and Tutoring Services to Implement Project-Based Learning

This presentation provides faculty with the knowledge and resources necessary to collaborate with librarians and tutors on incorporating project-based learning into their courses without sacrificing the time needed to teach the core course content. Participants identify the theory and practice of project-based learning, create a plan for building relationships with librarians and tutors to facilitate project-based learning, and understand the process that the presenters used to implement their project.

Nancy Eschen, Professor, Mathematics, Florida State College at Jacksonville; Amber Strickland, Librarian, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

College to Career: Connecting the Classroom to Marketable Skills

During this session, participants explore how to connect their existing coursework to marketable skills badges students can earn in the classroom. Marketable skills badges are digital credentials that show employers that a student has demonstrated in-demand skills. The Course+Badge Initiative trains and credentials faculty as Badge Specialists able to integrate marketable skills badges into academic courses. Bring your course syllabus and schedule to practice tagging marketable skills in your course.

Eryn Berger, Interim Coordinator, Online Learning, Alamo Colleges District; Adrianna Sherman, Associate Professor, Alamo Colleges

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Come Discuss Course Customization Best Practices With Us!

As sources of course content for emerging technology areas continue to grow, the process of assembling course content becomes challenging. Come discuss challenges in selecting, customizing, and integrating content within courses at community colleges. We also discuss alignment with industry jobs and certifications. Come share your experiences adapting courses as well as integrating with learning management systems. Join us for insight on course development strategy!

Chris Bogart, Systems Scientist, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University; Jaromir Savelka, Postdoctoral Fellow, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, Carnegie Mellon University

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Come Together Right Now to Create a Sustainable Collaborative Community

Consistent with expanding interest in creating networks of interdisciplinary teams focused on tackling complex issues with measurable outcomes, the Quantitative Biology @ Community Colleges (QB@CC) network was developed. QB@CC is a growing network of biology and mathematics faculty collaborating to create OER content. During this session, QB@CC is presented as a model to encourage others to develop a network to meet challenges in their fields.

Joe Esquibel, Professor, Biology, Lansing Community College; John Starnes, Associate Professor, Biology, Southcentral Kentucky Community and Technical College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Compassion Fatigue, Resilience, and Self-Efficacy on the College Campus

Compassion fatigue (CF) is not new, but has only recently been applied to work in higher education. While easily understood for first responders in trauma services, the intricacies of CF and its impact on college teachers, counselors, and administrators often go unnoticed and unaddressed. This discussion explores the potential damage of ignoring CF and offers ways to protect and promote wellness on the college campus and in ourselves.

Erin Ambrose, Professor, Psychology, William Jessup University

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Compelling Communication for Teaching Faculty, Higher Education Professionals, and Administrative Leaders

Whether in a classroom, zoom meeting, team room, or a large auditorium, we all have a need to maximize the effectiveness of our communication to be memorable, meaningful, and inspiring. During this learning experience, the facilitators model elements that make for compelling communication that captivates and moves the listener, while motivating them to action, reflection, and learning. This discussion gives you the confidence and skills to better engage your audience.

David Katz III, Professor Emeritus, Political Science, Mohawk Valley Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Connecting the Dots in the Education-to-Employment Market With GoEducate

GoEducate has launched the first-ever, end-to-end education-to-employment marketplace that directly connects students, job seekers, college programs and pathways to jobs, internships, apprenticeships and employers. The platform is live at Odessa College and directly linked to employers in Odessa, Texas. Join the presenters as they discuss the advantages of GoEducate's "Opportunity Portal" at Odessa College.

Jonathan Fuentes, Vice President, Academic Partnerships, Odessa College; John Haddad, Director, Business Development and Partnerships, GoEducate; Timothy Johnson, Chief Marketing Officer, GoEducate

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

COVID-19 and the Classroom: Trauma Informed Strategies for Teaching During a Pandemic

Have you felt stress levels rise or noticed a difference in the behavior of your students? Teaching during a pandemic has raised a new set of challenges, one of which is increased trauma-grounded behaviors. Explore the crossover between trauma-based parenting and trauma-based teaching before discussing how to incorporate trauma-informed strategies as a way of creating a learning environment that reduces stress for students and instructors.

Christie Linger-Hunt, Assistant Professor, English, BridgeValley Community and Technical College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Creating a Sense of Belonging by Recognizing and Challenging Unconscious Bias in Higher Education

This session explores the socially constructed concepts of diversity, equity, and belonging and the effects of unconscious bias on employee retention. These complex issues lend themselves to increased discussion and dialogue. However, for conversations to lead to understanding and change, the importance of equitable language must be recognized. Come learn about how we can empower employees to engage and talk about issues of diversity more comfortably.

Jen Propp, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Kate Szetela, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Sonia Watson, Interim Assistant Dean, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Creating an Accessible and Inclusive Humanities Undergraduate Research Program at a Community College

At Miami Dade College, we strive for equity and have created an accessible and inclusive undergraduate research program in the humanities. The program features minimal entry requirements, faculty and staff support, and flexible presentation options. The presenters share the program’s philosophy and design, showcase student projects, and discuss how the program has bolstered student participation in humanities research. Participants learn how to create more accessible, inclusive, and equitable research opportunities for their students.

Ildiko Barsony, Faculty, English, Miami Dade College; Kirk Paskal, Director, Grants, Miami Dade College; Jacqueline Pena, Coordinator, Miami Dade College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Culturally Relevant Teaching Certification: A Professional Development Track for Course Development and Design

The instructional designers at Wake Tech Community College are developing a certification program for online faculty to demonstrate how to apply the main components of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in online, hybrid, and hyflex course development and design. During this discussion, the designers share an overview of the certification program, highlight what each course includes, share feedback from faculty who have taken a course, and ask participants to offer feedback or experiences.

Lauren Caruso, Interim Coordinator, Instructional Design and Development, Wake Technical Community College; Katie Surber, Instructional Designer, Wake Technical Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Deeper Learning With Green Screen Magic

Incorporating green screens into media projects can provide opportunities for students to reflect on learning in creative and personalized ways. This immersive learning experience can spark student engagement and illustrate the relevance of many concepts. During this session, participants explore ways the green screen effect can be used in teaching and learning to captivate student interest. Participants also have the opportunity to use an iPad to create media with a green screen effect.

Carlena Benjamin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Biology, Northeast Mississippi Community College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Room 403, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Don't Let the Pandemic Discourage Learning: Global Collaboration Projects Using Canvas

This session highlights how educational technology was optimized during the pandemic. Specifically, this session explores a six-week group collaboration that dealt with the Central America migration crisis. Participants are encouraged to initiate similar projects to deliver the best global experience for their students. Explore new and creative ways to bring global learning to classrooms through your own innovative Global Classroom project.

Margaret Lowry, Student, Nursing, Arkansas State University-Beebe; Eddie Supratman, Assistant Professor, History and Religion, Arkansas State University-Beebe; Stephanie Ungerank, Director, Instructional Design and Distance Learning, Arkansas State University-Beebe

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Room 403, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Dynamic Interpretation of Interactive and Visually Displayed Data

This presentation focuses on the complexities associated with interpreting visually displayed data. The presenters engage participants in a real-time interpretation of a variety of graphical displays of aggregate data. Participants have opportunities to offer their interpretations of cross-sectional and trend data. The presenters also illustrate how to create, modify, and interpret several chart types using Microsoft Excel. Participants identify and moderate biases in data interpretation.

Gail Illich, Professor, Mathematics, McLennan Community College; Paul Illich, President, Southeast Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Earn On to Learn On: Meeting Organizational Needs While Students Succeed

Experiential learning is paramount to providing students with the opportunity for reflective practice in monitored environments. Rising from the pandemic, we saw a need organizationally and with our students to create additional pathways for students to complete these types of experiences. This session presents the Earn On program developed at San Antonio College to help students participate in experiential learning while earning income, building professional networks, and providing a professional portfolio showing documented, marketable skills.

Oralia De Los Reyes, Dean, Student Success, San Antonio College; Sabrina Macal-Polasek, Team Lead, Student Enrichment Center, San Antonio College

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Educational Mobility of Highly Skilled Refugees: Is Your Institution Helping or Hindering Their Success?

Being a refugee comes with many stigmas, including not being safe, skilled, and welcomed. Despite perceived negative attitudes, refugees with an existing higher education need more than a resilient attitude to restore their professional identities; they need inclusive policies. Discuss how higher education institutions play a significant role in reestablishing identities, why it matters, and what collaborative steps leaders at your institution can take to serve this student population.

Samra Culum, Instructor, Education, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Email Communication; How to Win Friends and Not Alienate People Through Email

COVID-19 has made community college faculty, staff, and administrators incredibly dependent on email communication. There are, however, ways email can quickly go wrong and undermine an otherwise positive work environment. Participants discuss examples of email communication that harm rather than help our work environment. These examples include "the unnecessary reply all," "the blurt," "the dissertation," "the email debating society," and the infamous "ALL CAP YELLING."

Wallace Johnson, Dean, Social Sciences, Human Development, and Physical Education, San Bernardino Valley College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Embedding Resiliency Skills at the Institutional and Course Levels to Promote Student Retention and Success

This presentation covers the specific strategies that Southeast Community College used to improve student retention and success through enhanced resiliency skills. The presenters discuss how the institution embedded a climate and resiliency goal within its strategic plan. They also discuss how the institution operationalized and applied a set of resiliency skills throughout the college, including course-level strategies involving technology, course design, classroom engagement, and facilitated social interaction, in person and virtually.

Gail Illich, Professor, Mathematics, McLennan Community College; Paul Illich, President, Southeast Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Empowering Minority Female Leaders in Higher Education Through Cross-Race and Cross-Gender Mentorship

Literature has suggested that mentorship is one of the most crucial and influential components for career advancement. However, minority female leaders often face the difficult task of selecting a mentor based on similar characteristics, which leads minority females seeking mentoring opportunities to choose a mentor of a different race or gender. Participants examine the advantages and disadvantages of cross-race and cross-gender mentorship, review four significant themes from a phenomenological study, and share their personal experiences.

Jerica Nickerson, Department Chair and Professor, Speech Communications, Lone Star College-Houston North

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

EmPOWERing the Future

The Energy Academy exposes students to many careers and opportunities within the work world. This partnership between Duke Energy, Polk State College, and the American Association of Blacks in Energy introduces local students to career opportunities within the energy industry. The Academy includes a range of technical and soft skills needed to succeed. Project partners include vice presidents, engineers, and supervisors with the same or similar backgrounds as many of the first-generation students.

Joyce Bentley, Program Director, TRIO Student Support Services, Polk State College; Shagon Collins, Advisor, Polk State College; John Fynn, Program Manager, Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation, Polk State College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Encouraging Scholarly Teaching Through Offering a SoTL Institute for Faculty

Although teaching is at the heart of academia, many faculty members are educated solely in their disciplines and never receive formal teaching training. As a result, faculty may not have the knowledge and skills to improve their teaching in systematic and effective ways. Come discuss how training faculty in the scholarship of teaching and learning helps them make evidence-based decisions about teaching and helps to raise the value of teaching in general.

Diane Chapman, Associate Vice Provost, Faculty Development, NC State University

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Engaging Students in Course Content While Assessing Leading Indicators of Success in High-Impact Courses

The presenter shares how using anonymous surveys within the LMS to engage students in lesson content can provide valuable information measuring leading indicators of student success. Collecting this data may be useful to educators in proposing or developing curriculum revisions and additional student supports, especially in high-impact courses. Come participate in an anonymous survey, view the results, discuss the indicators, and brainstorm leading indicators for your courses.

Paige Huskey, Professor, English, Clark State College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Enhance Your Student Experience in Your Capstone

Wake Technical Community College’s Programming and Information Sciences department just completed a two-semester pilot with industry mentors working with capstone students. In two semesters, industry representatives mentored students as they wrote a professional system requirements document and built applications to meet those requirements. Learn how we enhanced our student experience and how you can enhance your capstone course.

Norene Kemp, Head, Programming and Information Sciences, Wake Technical Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Ensuring Full Inclusion for Diverse Students in Higher Education

Becoming an inclusive community requires participation from all higher education levels, from the top administration to faculty and staff to students, and helps improve the entire learning institution. Promoting diversity and equity for all students, strengthening access and accessibility with technology and student retention, and providing a framework for ensuring full inclusion in classrooms and on campus represent the framework for creating an inclusive environment.

Hanan Hanna, Professor, Information Technology and Digital Media, Pasco-Hernando State College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Equity Through C.A.R.E.: Student Success Through Partnerships in Access and Support

Tallahassee Community College (TCC) is uniquely positioned within the state of Florida. It services a three-county area with 60 percent of its students identifying as non-White. To address equity and access, TCC has developed an Equity Through C.A.R.E. Model with specific strategies that operationalize persistence and student success across all teaching modalities using embedded student support, faculty mentoring, and personalized learning paths.

Anthony Jones, Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs, Tallahassee Community College; Tricia Rizza, Associate Dean, Faculty Initiatives, Tallahassee Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Erasing Barriers to Student Success

Student success is typically measured through course success, persistence, and ultimately, graduation rates. One small, rural Mississippi Community College has shifted many textbooks to e-resources, restructured the advisement process, and adjusted college steps for applying for graduation. These shifts have allowed Copiah-Lincoln Community College to exceed the state graduation average for the past five years. This session shares three traditional student success barriers and improvement strategies the college implemented that are leading to student success.

Stephanie Duguid, Dean, Academic Instruction, Copiah-Lincoln Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Faculty to Faculty Data Coaching: Maximizing Useful, Usable, and Actionable Data for Faculty Use

Faculty are expected to use student data to improve practice. Yet, the data provided are rarely turned into useful, usable, and actionable information. Building on our successful December 2021 NISOD webinar, faculty—and those who provide them with data—learned how to focus on leading indicators and how to use them. Participants in this session learn how to engage in data conversations with their colleagues to support one another and improve student success.

Jordan Horowitz, Chief Operating Officer, Institute for Evidence-Based Change

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

First, Do No Harm: Equitable Grading Practices That Support Mastery

Our traditional systems of grading tend to reward behavior rather than knowledge, can be demotivating, and demand endless workarounds by instructors trying to improve student outcomes. During this session, we’ll introduce participants to an approach to grading that equitably assesses student learning and increases student persistence. The presenters share details about grading strategies, preliminary results, learnings from implementation, and a sample alternative assessment tool.

Earle Crosswait, Academic Specialist, Mathematics, Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College; Dan Ray, Senior Research Associate, Mathematics, WestEd

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Flexible Universal Design for Learning: Strategies for Designing an Accessible, Engaging, and Sustainable Hyflex Course

This preconference seminar provides instruction about how to extend Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to include learner choice and flexibility through a hyflex course model. The content is structured around a framework supported by UDL principles, Keller’s ARCS Model of Motivation, and Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning. By integrating multimedia, adaptive learning pathways, and student instruction on self-regulated learning, participants create a sustainable, motivating, and engaging hyflex course.

Candice Freeman, Faculty and Director, Clinical Laboratory Science/Health Sciences, Fayetteville Technical Community College; Michelle Walden, Dean, Allied Health Technologies, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Takes place on Saturday, 1–4 p.m. (Central Daylight Time)

Focusing on Students With Collaborative Professional Development

During this discussion, participants engage with learner-centered behaviors, teaching practices, and collaborative professional development (PD). The facilitator provides strategies and approaches to implementing collaborative PD for learner-centered practices and illustrates how various factors influence learner-centered practices. Come share personal experiences and discuss how using collaborative PD can encourage more learner-centered behaviors and teaching practices.

Debbie Baker, Instructional Designer, Maricopa Community College District/ Maricopa Center for Learning and Innovation

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

From eBay Telecom Parts to Zoom Rooms: Fostering Impactful Pedagogical Strategies in Modern Learning Spaces

What happens when a worldwide pandemic launches a community college from dated telecom technology to Zoom rooms? We’ll highlight how we supported faculty through learning curves to better footing, relay lessons learned from faculty’s experience delivering instruction to remote and local participants via Zoom rooms, and report subsequent student outcomes. Join us to experience pedagogical strategies that support universal design for learning, accessibility, and active-learning components in flexible course delivery powered by Zoom.

Samra Culum, Instructor, Education, College of Southern Idaho; Scott Rogers, Professor, Wellness and General Studies, College of Southern Idaho; Bethany White, Learning Designer, Teaching and Learning Center, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

From Face-to-Face to Online and Back Again: Providing Instructional Coaching and Support to Adjunct Faculty

Making the transition from teaching face-to-face to online has been a very challenging part of working in higher education during the pandemic. This presentation details how College of DuPage’s Adjunct Faculty Support Office provided instructional coaching during the switch to online instruction, as well as how we continue to support our adjunct faculty population as they make their way back to the physical classroom.

Jen Propp, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Kate Szetela, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Sonia Watson, Interim Assistant Dean, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Gamification: Using Badges

Learn how to gamify your course and use badges to promote interest and achievement. This session takes you through the ideas behind using badges, shows you how to enable and setup badges in Canvas, and demonstrates how to create your own unique badges. Gamification is a fun way to show your creative side! Bring a laptop if you can and begin creating right away!

Erin Thomas, Instructor, Education, Clovis Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Great "TIPs": Technology Inspired Participation to Motivate Student Success

A student-centered environment means gathering student input, but how do we gather honest, transparent, and genuine input from students? Get students involved, excited, and motivated about learning by gathering their input throughout the semester in fun, interactive, and anonymous ways. Bring your technology, just like your students bring theirs, and prepare to participate, have fun, get involved, and learn a few techie tips of the trade.

Camisha Broussard, Professor, English, Houston Community College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Growing as Professionals

Many times, we get stuck in a recurring schedule of daily tasks and activities, narrowly focused on our own worlds. However, when we work as a team within the institution or beyond, we can make an impact on each other and our communities. This session highlights two educational professionals who connected at a NISOD conference and their journey of collaboration and guidance, as well as the personal and professional development that has occurred.

Stephanie Duguid, Dean, Academic Instruction, Copiah-Lincoln Community College; Sean Glassberg, Director, Faculty Development, Horry Georgetown Technical College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Growth Mindset Leadership for Equitable Education and to Prevent Toxic Grading

Teachers as learners have a profound impact upon student mindset and academic success. During this session, participants explore ways to promote growth mindset, increase academic performance, and encourage collaboration among students. Participants also explore how to prevent toxic grading and create an environment where learning is valued by teachers and students and builds equity education within a growth mindset culture.

Dana Fergins, Adjunct Professor, History, Southern University at Shreveport Louisiana

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Hard Skills for Hard Times: What You MUST Bring to Class Now

Communication skills may or may not be hard skills in the sense of being countable, but they are hard in the sense of being difficult to master. Without effective communication skills, you will have no effect whatsoever on your students. Participants describe five practical communication strategies for engaging students in face-to-face and virtual classrooms, identify techniques for making meaningful connections with students appropriate to the teacher's discipline and topic, and identify unique benefits the teacher brings to his or her classroom.

Donn King, Associate Professor, Communication Studies, Pellissippi State Community College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

HELP! Comma Splice? APA Citations? How to Grade Essays When You’re Not a Grammar Geek

Writing can cause anxiety to create and grade. However, written communication is imperative in higher education. It's okay if you feel insecure about grading essays and writing assignments. As a chemist/statistician/nurse/sociologist, you are the subject-matter expert, not a writing instructor. This discussion provides a crash course in punctuation, documentation, and resources to help and share with your students. Did you know APA is now in its 7th edition? It's okay, we'll discuss that!

Debbie Audilet, Faculty, English, Craven Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

High Fives and Good Vibes

In the today’s world, it’s easy to get frustrated, procrastinate, and have a negative attitude toward yourself, your job, and those around you. This discussion shares strategies to stop procrastinating, start each day on a positive note, and select one word that gives you purpose. By having a positive attitude, daily challenges can be seen as opportunities and frustration and isolation can turn into satisfaction and collaboration.

Stephanie Duguid, Dean, Academic Instruction, Copiah-Lincoln Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Hip Hop and Social Media: The New Civic Square and the Answer to Inclusivity

Hip-hop and social media have proven the extent of their reach across all walks of life regardless of race, religion, politics, etc., making them the new civic square. Hip-hop is now the most consumed music genre, and the average person spends at least two hours daily on social media. Transcending even socioeconomics, these two mediums provide the best opportunity for inclusivity. A panel of experts provide practical examples of how hip-hop and social media can be incorporated into the classroom regardless of subject matter.

Jonathan Cabrera, Professor, Criminal Justice, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

How to Talk About Diversity So Students Will Listen: Using Play to Launch Critical Conversations

Discussing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion are essential for many courses and careers. Yet, these conversations often struggle to get started or can be met with student resistance. Using playful strategies can launch these conversations without minimizing the importance of the essential topics. This presentation uses hands-on experiences and real-world examples to help participants develop methods to teach these critical topics in a way that is engaging, respectful, and playful.

Megan Oed, Associate Professor, Human Services, Ivy Tech Community College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Hurricanes During a Pandemic: A Framework for Academic Continuity and Crisis Communication at Community Colleges

For some community college students, their academic careers have been disrupted by several major crises like hurricanes and a pandemic. This discussion provides a framework for community college administrators to ensure campus safety and improve crisis communication during a hurricane. For faculty, this discussion also involves how the pandemic has shaped academic continuity for a new post-pandemic academia.

Diane Chapman, Executive Director and Associate Vice Provost, Faculty Excellence and Community College Leadership, North Carolina State University Community College Leadership Program; Elizabeth Muckensturm, Senior Lecturer, Communication, Coastal Carolina University

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Importance of Faculty for Student Success

Nowhere do faculty make more of a difference than when in the classroom teaching. Faculty can excite and encourage students to surpass expectations. Join the presenter to discuss the importance of faculty in making the difference in student success.

Glynis Mullins, Instructional Coordinator, Academic Support, Pitt Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Improving Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity via an Equity Gap Analysis

This presentation focuses on River Parishes Community College's use of the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity's five-step Program Improvement Process for Equity (PIPE) to increase the access and success of underrepresented groups in CTE programs. Participants discuss the need to increase the access and success of underrepresented students in CTE, learn the steps involved in the PIPE process, and discuss root causes of the equity gaps that persist in CTE.

Esperanza Zenon, Associate Professor, CTE and STEM, River Parishes Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Improving Teaching Effectiveness With Project-Based Learning and Data-Informed Teaching

During this session, the presenters share effective methods to integrate project-based learning (PBL) and data-informed teaching (DIT) to offer online project-based courses at scale. For PBL, the presenters discuss how contextualized autograder feedback enables students to iteratively explore, experiment, and learn. DIT enables instructors to detect at-risk students and make interventions. The presenters also discuss how to effectively teach PBL using autograders and discuss best practices and potential pitfalls when using DIT.

Marshall An, Project Scientist, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University; Majd Sakr, Teaching Professor, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Inclusive Mentoring for Community College Students Participating in Bridge to the Baccalaureate

Community college students who participate in summer bridge-to-the-baccalaureate projects deserve a positive experience as they develop professional relationships with academic mentors. Through research conducted by the Louis Stokes Inclusive Mentoring in STEM Center of Excellence, we have identified mentoring best practices that, in addition to ensuring socio-academic integration, validate students’ background and sense of identity. This session highlights the main features of inclusive mentoring practices and opportunities for mentorship training.

Benjamin Flores, Director, Louis Stokes IM STEM Center of Excellence, The University of Texas at El Paso; Jose Maldonado, Instructor, Biology, El Paso Community College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Inclusive Teaching for Community and Technical College Faculty

The Inclusive STEM Teaching Project is a free online course that advances the awareness, self-efficacy, and ability of instructors to cultivate inclusive learning environments for their students. This Preconference Seminar immerses participants in interactive experiences from the course, including exploring issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in community college instructional settings. Participants also learn how the course supports instructors’ professional development.

Lisa Burgess, Professor, Biological Sciences, Broward College; Bennett Goldberg, Professor and Director, Physics and Astronomy and Program Evaluation Core, Northwestern University; Sarah Hokanson, Assistant Provost, Professional Development and Postdoctoral Affairs, Boston University

Takes place on Saturday, 1–4 p.m. (Central Daylight Time)

Increasing Financial Literacy in Higher Education Through Faculty Development

According to the latest financial literacy survey data collected by the National Financial Educators Council, the average score of incoming first-year students who just graduated from high school is 63 percent, demonstrating a need for financial literacy in higher education. This discussion provides faculty development strategies for increasing faculty awareness of the need for financial literacy and provides information about implementing curriculum designed specifically to address the personal financial literacy needs of undergraduates.

Melissa Weathersby, Professor, Personal Finance, Business, and Real Estate, San Antonio College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Increasing Persistence by Developing a Sense of Belonging in First-Generation, Non-Traditional College Students

Explore the intersectionality of being a first-generation and non-traditional college student. Come discuss which best practices are most coveted by students who are first-generation and non-traditional. Explore how a positive sense of belonging in college influences their persistence to graduation. Take home realistic ideas to support your institution's first-generation, non-traditional students.

Dana Pentz, Curriculum Director, Guided Pathways, Technical College of the Lowcountry

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Innovative Partnerships: Navigating the World of Transnational Higher Education Programming

COVID-19 has introduced various challenges to higher education, including the recruitment of international students to U.S. campuses. When international travel and mobility are restricted, how can students still benefit from getting an American college education without leaving home? Welcome to the world of transnational partnerships, an alternative to traditional international education! During this session, delve into the pros, cons, and complexities found in the world of international and transnational educational partnerships.

Maria Bernal, Senior Director, International Student Success, Broward College; Janice Toh, Associate Director, International Strategic Initiatives, Broward College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Leading the Horses to Water and Getting Them to Drink!

Even in the "old days," it was often a struggle to get students to complete assigned readings, do home-based activities, and succeed on graded assignments. This can be even more challenging in the online world. However, by using consistent course design, repeated cues, and personalization, you can lead those horses to water and maybe even get them to take a sip!

Jacklyn Pierce, Assistant Professor, English, Lake-Sumter State College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Leading Toward a New Possible in Community Colleges

There is no going back to “normal.” We’ve been through too much, learned too much, and are too motivated to help more students learn and live well than ever before. And rather than adapt to a “new normal,” this session makes the case for leaders to guide their colleges toward a new possible. To begin the journey toward this new possible, we’ll (1) confront the conflation of emergency remote learning with decades of online and blended-learning practice; (2) explore pandemic-inspired innovations from the pros and those freshly embracing digital tools; and (3) learn together from leaders, innovators, and each other as we contemplate what we want to bring forward in our own education efforts on the road ahead. Finally, we will discuss how we better connect to the aspirations and needs of our students and figure out how together we can make the new possible far better than normal ever was.

Gerardo de los Santos, Director, Community College Partnerships, Western Govenors University; Mark Milliron, Senior Vice President & Executive Dean of the Teachers College, Western Governors University

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Learning From One Another

During this session, the presenters discuss the Peer-2-Peer Learning Community created at Prince George's Community College in which faculty meet monthly to share ideas about teaching and learning in various modalities. The presenters share what they learned from one another during this semester-long cohort.

Deborah Bowles, Coordinator, Professional Development, Prince George's Community College; Sunnie Jackson, Professor, Mathematics, Prince George's Community College; Aaron Large, Professor, Mathematics, Prince George's Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Lessons Learned From Developing an Orientation to Online Teaching

Online learning at Prairie State College developed an Orientation to Online Teaching, a five-week online faculty development workshop that prepared instructors to teach online. The orientation reviewed standards for instructional design, best practices for online teaching, and tutorials for the college's D2L LMS. Participants designed a sample online course in an LMS sandbox and provided feedback via peer groups. This discussion shares the curriculum, structure, schedule, requirements, and lessons learned from this orientation.

Lirim Neziroski, Dean, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Sciences, Illinois Valley Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Lessons Learned From Teaching Science Courses During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Due to COVID -19, our college (like many others) was faced with the challenge of converting all face-to-face classes into remote versions. This rapid transition needed to ensure alignment of the course learning outcomes with the content being delivered in the remote setting. While restructuring course content for online delivery, we also investigated new resources to help deliver the laboratory component, trained faculty and students, and provided the necessary resources to all.

Nadia Hedhli, Associate Professor, Biology, Hudson County Community College; Abdallah Matari, Professor and Chair, Biology, Hudson County Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Levelling Up Your Course With Virtual Reality

Participants explore how to better engage students in learning experiences using free, inexpensive, and user-friendly technology. This session includes demonstrations and discussions about using easily accessible virtual reality technology and how to implement this technology in the classroom. Participants gain insights into how this technology fits in the classroom, learn about resources, and have the opportunity for a virtual reality experience.

Erin Thomas, Instructor, Education, Clovis Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

LGBTQ+ Allyship in the Classroom

Join the facilitators of this session for a discussion about being an LGBTQ+ ally on your campus and in your classroom. Learn about the community and how to develop safe spaces for students who identify as LGBTQ+. The session includes information sharing, reflective exercises, and interactive activities to help participants become more informed and effective allies.

Angela Fry, Associate Professor, Social Work and Human Services, Columbus State Community College; Jorie Schwartz, Assistant Professor, Social Work and Human Services, Columbus State Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Making Good on the Promise of the Open Door

While we know hard work and persistence are essential to success, we also know opportunity and access are the true keys to student persistence and achievement. The 1960s saw the creation of more than 500 “open-door community colleges,” which resulted in a dramatic increase in the “college going” population. But it soon became obvious many of the new enrollees were missing the fundamentals needed for academic success. Sadly, our colleges have made little progress in eliminating achievement gaps with entering students. John Roueche shares why it really doesn’t matter how much content one knows, and why it really is the role of faculty and staff to stimulate and facilitate student progress in our institutions to make sure our open door doesn’t continue to be a “revolving” door.

John Roueche, Executive Director, John Roueche Center for Community College Leadership, College of Education, Kansas State University

Takes place on Monday, 5/30/2022, 12-1:30 p.m., Grand Ballroom, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Media for Literacy: Strategies for Effectively Incorporating Media Technology Into the Classroom

The presenter has spent nearly 20 years using his unique blend of communications and education experience to design lessons that promote problem solving, creativity, and teamwork. “Media for Literacy,” a term he coined in 2012, describes the practice of using media production techniques — photography, graphic design, video, and audio production — to teach any concept or subject.

Reggie Grant, Associate Professor, Journalism, Tallahassee Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Room 403, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Meeting Needs to Promote Student Outcomes: How HPT and DTL Can Harmonize to Support Student

This session explores how Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model, a commonly used human performance framework and tool, can be used to isolate learner needs and facilitate instructional technology alignment to intended learning outcomes. Through systematically designed digital teaching and learning experiences, instructors can refine technology integration specifically tailored to meet the comprehensive needs of students. Examples of these learning experiences include digital scaffolding, online assessment, and digital feedback.

Candice Freeman, Program Director, Medical Laboratory Technology, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Modality Matters for Leaders: On-Ground, Online, Blended, Metaverse, and More

As we move down the road ahead, we’ll need to explore, understand, and embrace multiple modalities to reach and teach our diverse student bodies. This session explores how we can prepare our colleges to leverage multiple modalities to power the learning journeys of our increasingly diverse student populations, including first-gen, low-income, working, parents, and more. Moreover, we’ll unpack how we can think beyond just the classroom in this work, visioning how we leverage multiple modalities to connect effectively and serve well, advise effectively, and engage strategically the students in our charge.

Gerardo de los Santos, Director, Community College Partnerships, Western Govenors University; Mark Milliron, Senior Vice President & Executive Dean of the Teachers College, Western Governors University

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Model Matters for Community College Leaders: A Time for Learning Experience Design

Part of visioning the “new possible” is thinking expansively about our learning models. While 16-week semesters may work for some, other models are emerging that seem to power striving students even better. From shorter term models (e.g., 5- or 8-week terms) to competency/mastery-based learning strategies, new models of learning delivery and service—powered by multiple modalities—are changing the game for many institutions and their students. Join the conversation about how we think about and lead toward new models on the road ahead using learning experience design—a blend of ed tech, instructional design, and design thinking—to help guide the build out.

Gerardo de los Santos, Director, Community College Partnerships, Western Govenors University; Mark Milliron, Senior Vice President & Executive Dean of the Teachers College, Western Governors University

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Money Matters for College Leaders on the Road Ahead

Visioning new service and learning models matters. However, these innovations are unlikely to be stood up or maintained without a solid sustainability strategy. This session provides an opportunity for open conversation about how we can approach the very real challenges at hand, including expanding our fundraising, grant writing, and entrepreneurial partnerships.

Gerardo de los Santos, Director, Community College Partnerships, Western Govenors University; Mark Milliron, Senior Vice President & Executive Dean of the Teachers College, Western Governors University

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

More Than Relaxing: The Influence of Meditation 

Following a brief meditation session, participants discuss how a daily meditation practice can influence our sense of belonging, confidence, and how we perceive stress. Participants are challenged to examine and discuss how offering meditation as an extracurricular activity can support the nonacademic skills development of community college students. 

Melissa Krieger, Associate Professor, Education, Bergen Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

National Science Foundation ATE Grant Funding and Mentoring Opportunities

The National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education program has grant funding opportunities available to support STEM technician program development or improvement, faculty professional development, curriculum and educational materials development, outreach activities, and more. Learn about the new solicitation, qualifying activities, and multiple categories of NSF-ATE grant funding in support of STEM technician education. Are you considering an NSF-ATE grant proposal? Come learn more about NSF-ATE funding and proposal mentoring opportunities.

Greg Kepner, Principal Investigator, STEM, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

No Room for Doubt: The Corequisite Imperative

Corequisite support has been demonstrated to be a better approach than traditional prerequisite remediation. This high-impact strategy consistently yields dramatic results for students passing college-level math and English courses and gaining college momentum. Scaling corequisite support addresses institutional performance gaps for equitable student outcomes that lead to increased college completion. A Complete College America representative shares best practices for shifting policy, creating conditions for change, implementing proven strategies, and refining those approaches over time.

Brandon Protas, Strategy Director, Complete College America

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Operation Rescue: Reengaging Disengaged Learners

Are you meeting the needs of diverse, adult learners? StraighterLine and UPCEA conducted research profiling the disengaged learner and how their situations and motivations are different from other adult learners. This presentation uses empirical research to illuminate who higher education’s disengaged learners are, what causes them to disengage, and what motivates them to re-engage and why. Join us to learn all this and more, including what retention strategies and tactics the research identified as most effective.

Amy Smith, Chief Learning Officer, StraighterLine

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

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Pandemic Programming: Retooling Part-Time Faculty Development During COVID-19

Since 2015, Alamo College District has offered a three-phase, face-to-face, adjunct faculty certification program that provides part-time faculty with current pedagogical tools. To meet the needs of faculty during the pandemic, this program's modality, content, and structure were retooled to an online format. That change resulted in a 96 percent increase in graduates of this program. This session explores the strategies used to maintain the continuity and quality of the program during COVID-19.

Scott D'Amico, Faculty Development Lead, Political Science, Alamo Colleges; Carmen Mercedez, Director, Instructional Professional Development, Alamo Colleges; Bobbie Myatt, Faculty Development Specialist, Communications, Alamo Colleges; Elizabeth Plummer, Faculty Development Specialist, English as a Second Language, Alamo Colleges

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Parental and Mentoring Support for Dual Credit and Early College Students

Every year there are more dual credit and early college students taking classes at community colleges. Most of these students are under 18 years old, live with their parents, and still need a substantial amount of academic and socioemotional support. How can we change the mindset in college regarding parental involvement and build bridges that benefit students? Come explore this idea during this session!

Aldo Prado, Dean, Early College, San Jacinto College/Pasadena ISD; Mariana Prado Flores, Graduation Coach and Instructor, Mathematics, Pasadena ISD

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Plagiarism, Disinformation, and Misinformation . . . Oh, My! We're Not Just a Card Catalog Anymore, Toto!

Have you encountered higher than normal percentages of plagiarism in your online and hybrid classes? What about less than stellar research for papers? Libraries and librarians are uniquely situated to support their communities with difficult problems like these. Join a conversation about the development of a workshop series designed to assist faculty and students with plagiarism, information literacy, and critical-thinking skills instruction. Examples of instruction and student success are discussed.

Stephanie Johnson, Faculty Librarian, Pensacola State College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Play to Win! Leveraging the Unique and Valuable Roles of Community and Technical Colleges to Enable College Completion

Dr. Watson Spiva addresses the special roles community and technical colleges play in the college completion movement. She also identifies barriers and solutions to ensuring positive, postsecondary outcomes for students of color, students with disabilities, first-time college students, and students from low-income communities. Dr. Watson Spiva grounds her discussion in Complete College America’s four pillars for student success and the manifold strategies within those pillars for increasing access to and success in postsecondary environments, while also addressing ways to close equity gaps in college completion outcomes.

Yolanda Watson Spiva, President, Complete College America

Takes place on Tuesday, 5/31/2022, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., Grand Ballroom, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Playing Chess Versus Checkers With Student Services

This discussion explores how to improve student services by applying chess-like, three-dimensional, strategic thinking and planning as opposed to traditional, two-dimensional, checkers-like thinking. This discussion involves discussing student admissions, registration, advising, and retention processes geared towards supporting institutional strategic goals and objectives.

Mark McKinney, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Pasco Hernando State College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Preparing the Next Generation of STEM Community College Faculty Through Regional Collaboratives

For the past three years, the NSF INCLUDES Aspire Alliance has implemented a growing number of regional collaboratives dedicated to preparing diverse cohorts of future STEM faculty interested in teaching at two-year institutions. Program participants include graduate students, faculty mentors from community colleges, and guest speakers from professional organizations. During this session, the presenters discuss how each collaborative has adapted a professional development program with mentoring and classroom observation at its core.

Thomas Ready, Professor, Chemistry, Midland College; Sara Rodriguez, Coordinator, STEM, UTEP

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Project SURE: Scaffolding STEM Students in Research From the Classroom to REUs and Beyond!

Project SURE is a recently awarded HBCU NSF grant that will guide students from active research in the classroom, to work study positions in their field of study, to local research, to research experiences for undergraduates, to internships and transfer to universities. The project is driven by faculty professional development in local evidence-based learning and at national conferences.

Marie-Michelle Saint Hubert, Associate Professor, Engineering, St. Philip's College; Kathy White, Professor, Biology, St. Philip's College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Promoting Integrative Learning to Cultivate Student World-Ready Skills

Participants learn how Tarrant County College developed a model to align pedagogy, space, and technology to create learning environments that better support student engagement and learning. Presenters share how faculty are leading the effort of promoting integrative learning, selecting relevant technology, and informing the design of learning spaces. Presenters also share how professional development supports this framework, which is being implemented across the college.

Zarina Blankenbaker, President, Northwest Campus, Tarrant County College District; Kevin Harper, Chair, Kinesiology, Northeast Campus, Tarrant County College District; Paige Lovelace, Chair, Language Arts, South Campus, Tarrant County College District

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Public/Private Partnership: Creating Transformational Opportunity Through Career and Technical Dual-Credit Programming

Nevada Gold Mines approached the College of Southern Nevada and Clark County Schools to explore ways to provide workforce readiness and a credential of value to high school students from underrepresented populations. The three partners developed two college-credit career pathways in industrial maintenance and diesel technology that lead to gainful employment in high-demand fields in the mining industry. Replicable hallmarks of the program include collaborative curriculum/schedule development, intentional family engagement, executive-level support, and philanthropic funding.

Liliana Bonderov, Assistant Principal, Career and Technical Education Magnet Programming, Rancho High School; Margo Martin, Chief, Accreditation and Institutional Effectiveness, College of Southern Nevada; Christine Whetten, Manager, Talent Acquisition, and Talent Management, Human Resources, Nevada Gold Mines

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Push or Pull? Coordinated Crafting of Meaning for Engagement in Education

“Educate” comes from the word “educe,” which means to pull forth from. But students often view education as a pouring into. If you find yourself completely frustrated at times with your students and with teaching in general, you may be trying to “push a rope.” During this session, the presenters share a different approach based on solid communication principles to help you pull instead of push to create a better experience for you and your students.

Donn King, Associate Professor, Communication Studies, Pellissippi State Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Putting the "Why" in FYE: An Intentional Redesign of a Student Success Course

Research shows that students who participate in academic success courses have more meaningful interactions with faculty and other students and are more likely to complete a credential. However, students often enter these courses asking, “Why am I here?” To help answer this question, Madisonville Community College restructured its academic success course with an emphasis on intentional design. This session offers strategies for strengthening first-year success courses and answers student and faculty “whys.”

Sara Adams, Professor and Coordinator, Music and First Year Experience, Madisonville Community College; Stephanie Self, Student Affairs Specialist and Transfer Advisor, First Year Experience, Madisonville Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Quality Matters for the Student Experience

Shelton State Community College (SSCC) required a reliable and organized system for syllabus management. As a result, SSCC implemented an online syllabus management platform to meet state standards, ensure consistency, and provide a seamless editing and revision process. The result of this effort was not only positive for institutional aspects such as Quality Matters, it decreased the time and effort necessary to create and manage syllabi and significantly improved the student experience.

Angela Gibson, Instructor, Speech and English, Shelton State Community College; Christine Wilson, Director, eLearning, Shelton State Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Reconsidering Faculty Development: Learning Through a Pandemic

The purpose of this presentation is to share reflections and facilitate discussion about how we might consider faculty development differently following the pandemic. We have previously presented our research at NISOD’s conference exploring numerous variables (e.g., approaches, benefits, challenges, culture) that influence faculty development. During this session, we contextualize these earlier findings with observations and experiences realized during the pandemic to consider how we might approach faculty development in the future.

Desalyn De-Souza, Dean, Human Services, Empire State College; Mike Gillespie, Associate Vice President, Learning and Teaching, Saskatchewan Polytechnic

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Reformatting Composition 1: Emphasizing Collegiate Effectiveness to Strengthen Student Success and Composition Skills

Discuss redeveloping a Composition I course with modernized pedagogical frameworks to enrich composition and rhetorical studies along with critical and digital literacy skills in curriculums. Participants identify ways to scaffold assignments to enrich students’ ability to research and write, discuss thematic options and successful use of a unified text and syllabus while keeping academic liberty, and create a scaffolded assignment to use in the classroom.

James Crawford, Lecturer, English, Our Lady of the Lake University; Laura Petersen, Instructor, Professional Writing and Communication, Our Lady of the Lake University

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Removing Barriers to Entrepreneurship Education

The Broward College Entrepreneurship Experience (BCEx) is an ambitious framework designed to expand ideation and value creation among the college’s 63,000 students. In addition to creating entrepreneurs, the bigger goal is to create a culture shift that instills an entrepreneurial mindset across Broward College—impacting faculty, staff, and students. BCEx uses the Ice House model to introduce entrepreneurship as the self-directed pursuit of opportunities to create value for others, whether in business or their personal lives.

Gary Schoeniger, Founder and CEO, Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative, Inc.; Imran Siddiqui, Associate Vice President, Workforce Education Employment Solutions, Broward College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

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Revising Developmental Writing for Sustainable Success: The CCAC Accelerated Learning, Embedded Tutor Model

This session introduces the CCAC developmental writing model. The presenters share their rationale for the design, the role of supplemental instruction and embedded writing tutors, evidence from the pilot and first semester of collegewide rollout, and the administrative challenges inherent to major institutional change. Our model is replicable and the reason why we are sharing best practices with other community college educators.

Ashleigh Fox, Assistant Professor, English, Community College of Allegheny County; Elizabeth Throesch, Professor and Chair, English, Community College of Allegheny County; Ann von Waldenburg, Student Engagement Specialist and Adjunct Instructor, English, Community College of Allegheny County

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 3, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Revolutionary Scholarship: The Bond Between Social Justice and the Classroom Experience

In a time when social justice and Black and Brown empowerment are needed more than ever, this discussion seeks to unpack the relationship between scholarship and how it can be used to motivate action. Historically, it is the youth who play key roles from one revolutionary cause to the next. Come discuss how this was true for leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Fred Hampton, and Black Panther Founder Huey P Newton.

Jonathan Cabrera, Professor, Criminal Justice, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Rock Enrolling Our Way Through One-Day Registration at San Antonio College

College enrollment and registration can be a lengthy and difficult process. Students are often overwhelmed with multiple enrollment steps and several visits to campus. Our one-day event brings together several student success departments under one roof to eliminate possible barriers and move students through enrollment and registration. Join us as we run through our fast-paced, one-stop experience!

Cynathia Broadnax, Certified Coach, Enrollment, San Antonio College; Lenell Clay, Team Lead, Welcome Center, San Antonio College; Caresa Medellin, Certified Coach, Enrollment, San Antonio College

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Sharing Our Students' Stories: Lessons Learned and Lives Changed (The No Greater Odds National Tour)

The Emmy-nominated documentary No Greater Odds (www.nogreaterodds.com) burst onto the national scene in 2016, highlighting the important mission of community colleges by celebrating our students' stories. Join the co-creator and co-producer who shares stories and lessons learned from students, faculty, and staff about what matters most in maximizing student support and success. Learn how sharing your students' stories can invite conversation and inspire change in your own college and community.

Charlene S. Gibson, Professor, Communication Studies, College of Southern Nevada

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

SPEAKing Up for Student Success: Starting and Growing a Discipline-Specific Success Center

Looking for a way to increase student success in your discipline? Consider starting or growing a discipline-specific success center. Wake Tech started the Speech Preparation Essentials and Knowledge (SPEAK) center in the fall of 2013 to serve communication students. Since then, we've seen notable student gains in every measure. Join us as we share best practices, lessons learned, and future plans. Participants will have time to ask questions, brainstorm, and collaborate.

Brittany Hochstaetter, Professor, Communication, Wake Technical Community College; Emily Moore, Department Head, Communication and Theatre, Wake Technical Community College; Angela Smedley, Assistant Professor, Communication, Wake Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 7, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Start There, Get Here: A Unique Perspective on Engaging Students in the Community

During this discussion, new models for engaging non-traditional students in non-traditional ways are presented. These models have enabled successful adult basic, vocational, and technical training programs to be delivered in a wide range of community, corporate, and correctional partner locations across Central Texas.

Donald Tracy, Director, Corporate and Community Education, Austin Community College District

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Strategies to Enhance Undergraduate Research in the Humanities

Undergraduate research has been noted as a high-impact practice and is recently getting more attention in the humanities. During this discussion, explore the definition of undergraduate research and the different implementation levels, from basic research skills to independent student-led research projects. Participants analyze their current undergraduate research practices and identify ways to create or enhance classroom and cocurricular undergraduate research opportunities for their students.

Jacqueline Pena, Instructor, English, Indian River State College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Student Report as an Effective Formative Assessment Tool to Improve Student Learning and Our Assessment

What if you could visually identify which chapter and Boom’s taxonomy level your students were struggling with? What if you could use that information to clearly and visually show your students how to improve? This session transforms your digital exam and quiz data into a very effective student report and formative assessment tool. This report not only improves student learning, but also provides a great tool for assessing your teaching practices.

Daiju Hoshino, Instructor, Biology, Tarrant County College District

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Students' Pasts in Current Classrooms: Trauma-Informed and Healing-Centered Practices

Students often have complex and sometimes painful histories. These experiences in turn impact student success. This discussion examines how trauma impacts learning and provides campus-wide strategies for engaging students with traumatic experiences. Also discussed are recent developments in Healing Center Engagement, a strengths-based approach for collectively supporting and healing our communities. Come create a personal plan for incorporating trauma-informed and healing-centered practices in your work.

Megan Oed, Associate Professor, Human Services, Ivy Tech Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Study? No One Ever Taught Me How to Do That!

As teachers, we ask students to study for the upcoming test. However, students rarely are taught how to study based on brain science. Often, they merely reread their notes and struggle on the test, leaving them and their teachers frustrated. This discussion provides information about how learning works, research-backed study skills, resources, and how the facilitator started teaching students how to study more effectively.

Melissa Evans, Professor, Kinesiology, Tarrant County College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Teaching About Self-Regulated Learning as Part of Day-One Instruction

This discussion provides an opportunity to chat about ways instructors teach students how to self-direct and self-regulate their learning experiences in various modes of instructional delivery. Discussions surround face-to-face, online, and hyflex course modalities and how instructors help students learn how to regulate their own learning pathways, focusing on objective mastery and successful student outcomes. Best practices, emerging technologies and strategies, and challenges are available for sharing and collaboration.

Candice Freeman, Faculty and Director, Clinical Laboratory Science/Health Sciences, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 9:15–10:15 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Teaching Online and Remote STEM Courses With "Live Labs"

Decades of research demonstrate the benefits of active learning, but as remote and online modalities become more prevalent this beneficial practice can easily be lost, especially in courses with a laboratory component. Live Labs have instructors performing live laboratory procedures and experiments while students provide input through video conference (e.g., Zoom, GoToMeeting, etc.).

Eric Madrid, Associate Professor, Biology, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Teaching Students How to Learn in College

Many students come to community colleges following a more indirect route than simply graduating at the top of their high school class and moving into a dorm. If someone struggled in grade school or took time off before college, they may need some learning guidance. After several years of teaching online chemistry, I made a specific list of what I think my students should do to get an “A” in my class.

Kathy Carrigan, Professor, Chemistry, Portland Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 2, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Teams Rapid Assessment and Feedback: Application of Online MS Teams Platforms for Postsecondary Assessments

This presentation is based on a research project implemented at Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in which approximately 100 technical college students participated in more than 30 online assessments in 2021-2022. A Microsoft Teams online assessment platform (Dugga) was adapted to run the tests. As the first trial of this type in North America, the study proves to be a successful application of the TRAF technique in postsecondary skilled-engineering education.

Amir Mokhtari Fard, Associate Professor, Engineering, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Calm After the Storm: Student Engagement Through Active Learning

Challenging times provide opportunities for creativity and growth. The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged educators to find new ways to engage students. Active learning places the student in the driver’s seat and encourages them to be participants in their learning, placing greater emphasis on group work, problem-solving, discussions, and feedback. Explore active-learning strategies that maximize student success in the post-pandemic learning environment.

Joanna Campbell, Professor, Dental Hygiene, Bergen Community College; Lisa Mayer, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies, Bergen Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Community College Baccalaureate: National Landscape and Role in Equity and Economic Justice

The community college baccalaureate has been an innovation for the past 20 years. During the past few years, community college baccalaureates have experienced tremendous growth across the nation. The realities surrounding the COVID pandemic have laid bare the social and economic inequalities that result from a system that provides unequal access to baccalaureate attainment. Proponents of community college baccalaureates view the degree as an engine for economic development and social justice.

Angela Kersenbrock, President, Community College Baccalaureate Association

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

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The Employee Experience: Next Step Career Preparation Through Innovation, Strategy, and Meaningful Engagement

Colleges, like many industries, are facing competitive employee markets. It is of the utmost importance that colleges strategically engage our current employees for next-step career preparation. This discussion provides a high-level overview of the steps the facilitators are taking to close the upskill gaps and create this framework.

Teresa 'Terri' Garcia, Coordinator, Professional Development, Lone Star College-Tomball

Takes place on Monday, 3–4 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Impact of Grading Equity on Students and Your Relationships With Them

Creating a culture in your classroom that demonstrates equity, encourages a desire for success, reflects care and compassion, and builds strong and lasting relationships can be foundationally built on your grading practices. This discussion is based on research from Joe Feldman and is designed for educators who want to analyze their grading practices and consider long-held ideas about assessment that could be creating roadblocks to connecting with their students, retention, and completion rates.

Julie Stewart, Associate Professor, Business, Community College of Aurora

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Institutional Impact of Implementing ACUE Training From a Facilitator and Faculty Development Perspective

The results of implementing ACUE training across multiple cohorts are examined from the presenter’s perspective. He has completed ACUE’s course and facilitated multiple cohorts before and during the COVID-19 pandemic for the University of the District of Columbia Community College, a public HBCU/urban land-grant in Washington, D.C. where he directs faculty development. Data, best practices, and the most impactful techniques are explored and highlighted.

Peter Plourde, Director and Associate Professor, Faculty Development, University of the District Columbia Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Power of Culturally Responsive Teaching on Diversity, Equity, and Student Success

With the changing landscape in colleges, it is vital for faculty to create inclusive and equitable classrooms. This session analyzes a comprehensive framework of culturally responsive teaching based on how students’ motivation is influenced by their cultures and explores teaching strategies guided by it proven to promote diversity, equity, and student success. Participants can use the framework as a rubric to evaluate their pedagogy and make it more culturally responsive.

Shuang Zhao, Associate Professor, Speech, Lone Star College-Montgomery

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Professional Buddy System: Individualized Professional Development

Participants learn how to create a Buddy System unique to their institution! Over the course of a term, faculty pair and pursue a progressive series of opportunities to investigate each other's pedagogy, assignments, and curriculum following a self-paced, growth-mindset oriented curriculum delivered online. For our sixteen-week semester, faculty respond to eight prompts including a course visit, an exercise in metaphor, and a deep dive into an assignment. Exercises inspire faculty to engage in conversation and consider how attitudes and style impact student learning.

Kyle Torke, Academic Director, Arts, Sciences, and Education, Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

The Surprising Bounty in Small Spaces

Climate change and food deserts are a reality. Growing herbs and vegetables sustainably as part of a twelve-week plant growth lab entices, encourages, and empowers students. In-class discussions where weekly growth data and pictures are shared are engaging. At the end of 12 weeks, students submit a lab report that lists growth conditions, weather data, plant measurements, steps taken for troubleshooting, food harvested, and their vision for their future garden.

Indrani Sindhuvalli, Professor, Biology, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Thinkers, Feelers, Introverts, and Extraverts: Understanding and Communicating Better With Your Students

The diversity of students today can require individualized approaches to communication. There are no personality types that are better or worse, healthier or frailer. Each type has its own inherent strengths and potential weaknesses. Using examples from actual classes, the presenter helps participants understand and communicate better with their students. The challenges that may have occurred in the past are explained and strategies are provided to overcome them.

Samra Culum, Instructor, Education, College of Southern Idaho; Scott Rogers, Professor, Liberal Arts and Experiential Education, College of Southern Idaho; Bethany White, Learning Designer, Teaching and Learning Center, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Sunday, 2:15–3:15 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Upgrading the Language Classroom: Technology and Virtual Reality for Improved Student Motivation and Confidence

During this discussion, participants test virtual reality programs and other technology they can use in their language classrooms for little or no cost. Participants also learn about current study results related to using ImmerseMe virtual reality in Spanish classes at St. Philip's College.

Spencer Galvan, Assistant Professor, Spanish, St. Philip's College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Useful Technology to Enhance Collaboration in Your Post-Pandemic Courses

There’s no doubt that the past two years have been challenging for students and faculty. During this session, the presenters demonstrate socially distanced methods for teaching and applying course content through various free technology. We discuss Google Slides, Poll Everywhere, virtual escape rooms, H5P, breakout rooms, Group me, and more. Learn how to increase engagement by collaborating safely and positively!

Alicia Parker, Adjunct Professor, Education, Daytona State College; Amy Ringue, Professor, Education, Daytona State College

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 4, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Using Emotional Intelligence, Building Self-Efficacy, and Incorporating Growth Mindset to Empower Learners

All of us, within our classrooms and beyond, have a profound impact upon the emotional state of the people with whom we engage. The neuroscience is clear: The affective domain powerfully impacts students' cognition, persistence, motivation, and performance. During this multidimensional, highly interactive, experiential, and fun presentation, participants explore ways they can increase the chances of positive, motivated, engaged collaboration in their classrooms and relationships in a manner that maximizes inclusion and equity.

David Katz III, Professor Emeritus, Political Science, Mohawk Valley Community College

Takes place on Saturday, 1–4 p.m. (Central Daylight Time)

Using Extended Reality (Virtual Reality) in Teaching for Improved Learning Outcomes

Virtual reality is an emerging tool that can significantly improve learning outcomes. Participants discuss tools that can be used in the chemistry classroom for little or no cost. A list of 3D tools that can be used in teaching chemistry are provided and participants practice with and learn about these tools. Having a laptop available for practice will make for a better experience.

Basu Panthi, Associate Professor, Chemistry, St. Philip's College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30–9:30 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

We Aren't Doing Them Any Favors: Hyflex Course Design That Accounts for All Students

You're probably almost ready to teach a hyflex course! Following this presentation, instructors who are novices or have moderate background knowledge about the hyflex delivery mode, as well as diverse, equitable, and inclusive pedagogical practices, can convert a course previously developed in any presentation modality to a hyflex course. The presenters describe why hyflex courses are most beneficial to students and help instructors overcome conversion fears.

Stephanie Laszik, eLearning Specialist, Faculty Development, Kilgore College; Mary Shaw, Chair, Biological Sciences, Kilgore College; Nicholas Simpson, Associate Professor, Biology, Kilgore College

Takes place on Sunday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Room 401, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Wellness in Nursing School

Anxiety is identified as a barrier to learning at Barton Community College Nursing. Faculty, staff, and academic advisors demonstrate caring behaviors to the unique student population who struggle academically because of stress and anxiety. How can a program prepare students for the real demands and dramatic lifestyle changes required to enter the field? Barton Community College Nursing created a wellness module in the current LMS to guide students when anxiety runs high and attrition rates are at risk.

Kristin Steele, Simulation Coordinator, Nursing, Barton Community College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

What Happens in the Classroom When You Turn "No" Into "No Worries?"

"I don’t know what you did in that class, but wow, it was life-changing to them!" The answer is simple: a change in response from "no" to "no worries." Come discuss how a simple change in mindset and strategy changed the outcome of an entire class and resulted in less stress for the instructor. Flexibility and resiliency have been at the core of pandemic teaching. How can we as instructors embrace it?

Elizabeth Muckensturm, Senior Lecturer, Communication, Coastal Carolina University

Takes place on Tuesday, 8–9 a.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

What I've Learned About Student Communication and Learning Preferences Since COVID-19

We may look at the pandemic as giving us our first five-letter curse word, but it's also provided us with a unique opportunity to try different teaching and communication strategies with our students. Come consider and discuss research that shows how students prefer to learn and communicate in a rapidly shifting paradigm.

Sean Glassberg, Director, Faculty Development, Horry Georgetown Technical College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Why Am I So Tired? How Zoom Fatigue Impacts Our Ability to Teach

Teaching with technology can be helpful in engaging our students, but using technology comes with a cost. The side effects of technology are causing many instructors to feel a technological hangover resulting in feelings of fatigue. During this discussion, explore zoom fatigue and how technology interferes with our brain’s natural ability to communicate. Self-care and the importance of boundaries are discussed as well.

Rachel Gallardo, Department Head, Psychology and Anthropology, Blinn College District

Takes place on Sunday, 1–2 p.m., Salon 8, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Why Your College Should Host a NISOD Workshop!

This session is a synopsis of workshops available through NISOD as either a Campus, Regional, or Virtual Workshop. Hear about available workshop topics from several NISOD workshop facilitators, learn specifics about the three workshop formats, and discover how you can have one of NISOD’s workshops brought to your campus.

Chelsea Biggerstaff, Interim Manager, Faculty Development, Austin Community College District; Sean Glassberg, Director, Faculty Development, Horry Georgetown Technical College; David Katz, Professor Emeritus, Political Science, Mohawk Valley Community College; Edward Leach, Executive Director, NISOD, The University of Texas at Austin; Elizabeth Mosser, Associate Dean and Deputy Coordinator, Academic Operations and Title IX, Harford Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45–10:45 a.m., Salon 1, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)

Yes, You Have Unconscious Bias, Too: Understanding and Overcoming Unconscious Bias in Education

This session provides a rich, life-changing experience for everyone involved in the education system. We use “a-ha” activities and deep conversations to explore unconscious bias. Be ready for insightful revelations that change how you interact with others. The session aims to explain how biases are formed in our unconscious, identify the impact of unconscious bias in the educational system, and apply effective strategies for reducing unconscious bias.

Karie Kennedy, Program Director and Instructor, Behavioral Sciences, Western Dakota Technical College

Takes place on Monday, 1:45–2:45 p.m., Room 403, 4th Floor (Central Daylight Time)