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Conference Program

NISOD’s International Conference on Teaching and Leadership Excellence is the definitive gathering of community and technical college educators passionate about teaching and learning. Over the years, NISOD’s annual conference has provided faculty, administrators, and staff with the resources, ideas, and solutions that drive excellence in all areas of community and technical college campuses. Come and be inspired by thought-provoking sessions and pre-conference seminars designed specifically for community and technical college educators committed to improving student achievement. With more than 300 sessions in a variety of focus areas and formats presented by your colleagues from across the nation and internationally, you’ll walk away with dozens of ideas you can implement immediately!

Sessions presented are subject to change.

NISOD is transitioning to a paperless conference program by our 2020 conference. For our 2018 conference, only session titles will be included in the conference program. Full conference session descriptions can be found in our app, which can be downloaded here. In addition, we will also upload a printable PDF to the conference’s website closer to the event dates that participants can download and print.

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JUMP TO: | Keynote Speakers | Special Sessions | Administrator Series | Breakout Sessions | Roundtable Discussions |

Keynote Speakers

We live in a society that often does not respect the importance of a promise. It is too easy to say "I'll get to it" or "tomorrow." In many ways we have become numb to disappointment and broken commitments. This expectation starts to fade into our character as individuals. Alex Sheen, founder of the international social movement "because I said I would," believes that every individual has the strength to become a person of their word. Alex shares his insights and actionable ways to become better at fulfilling commitments. Alex inspires others to become more accountable to their promises through compelling real-life examples from the movement and convincingly illustrates how integrity and keeping your promises are forever interwoven. Alex discusses how holding ourselves and each other accountable truly changes humanity for the better.

Alex Sheen, Founder, because I said I would

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 12:00 PM, Austin Grand Ballroom, 6th Floor

The needs of today’s students are different than from any time in recent history, and the importance of education’s impact on improving economic mobility has never been more pronounced. Furthermore, faculty are realizing that the ideal “college-ready” student is a myth, as they see growing numbers of students in need of access to resources at the college and in their communities. This session provides a framework for creating a "Community of Care" that addresses students’ needs while simultaneously breaking down perceived barriers to their success. The model focuses on four areas: Culture, Communication, Collaboration, and Creativity. It is designed to help students feel connected and engaged on college campuses, especially within classrooms. During this keynote presentation, the audience learns the importance of creating a community of care within their own learning environments and the steps to take to make it happen.

Tonjua Williams, President, St. Petersburg College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 11:45 AM, Austin Grand Ballroom, 6th Floor

Special Sessions

Two-year colleges in the United States are leading the way in ensuring all students have access to undergraduate research. They are finding ways to integrate authentic and accessible research into the curriculum by identifying research possibilities in their communities, including environmental issues like safe water, archival research at local historical societies, and collaborations with local business and social service agencies. As a result, students learn how to ask questions, identify problems, use evidence to seek solutions, and develop oral and written communication skills through course-based research. The presenter discusses how embedding research experiences into the curriculum, particularly in first- and second-year courses, opens up undergraduate research for all students and has the potential to ameliorate some education inequities

Nancy Hensel, President, New American Colleges and Universities

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 602, 6th Floor

Via a partnership between NISOD, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, and Do Good Work Educational Consulting, Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges identifies and celebrates promising practices at community and technical colleges in recruiting, retaining, and developing diverse faculty, staff, and students. Learn about the annual survey, as well as the promising practices observed among this year’s Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges.

Royel Johnson, Assistant Professor, Higher Education, Penn State University; Terrell Strayhorn, Professor, Walden University, Founding CEO, Do Good Work Educational Consulting LLC

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 602, 6th Floor

As Austin Community College embarked on its guided pathways initiative, we recognized the need for consolidated and streamlined student services through innovative methods. We set a goal of providing real-time student support through our Student Services Help Desk, which reduced the need for students to visit multiple campuses or departments. The Help Desk uses multiple methods of communication—phone, live chat, and email—and has been integral in introducing and initiating video advising. The Help Desk monitors student service metrics and leads the way with data-based decision making. The Help Desk handled more than 270,000 student calls, emails, and live chats during the 2017 academic year, providing a solution for integrated and efficient student support.

Librado Buentello, Director, Student Services Help Desk, Austin Community College; Melissa Richardson Curtis, Associate Vice President, Enrollment Management, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 602, 6th Floor

Students and faculty consistently report that advising is the most important student service that colleges offer. Data from the Center for Community College Student Engagement suggest that students who receive more advising—more time with advisors and more in-depth discussions during their sessions—are more engaged. Join us for a look at the Center’s latest national report, Show Me the Way: The Power of Advising in Community Colleges, which helps colleges understand the student experience with academic advising and planning.

Linda García, Assistant Director, Center for Community College Student Engagement, The University of Texas at Austin; Michael Ximenez, Director, Advising, Palo Alto College-Alamo Colleges District

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 602, 6th Floor

Since President Obama introduced his 2020 goal to increase the percentage of citizens with college degrees, completion rates and how to improve them have been at the forefront of higher education institutional agendas. American Association of Collegiate Registrars researchers set out to understand how certain initiatives are impacting student completion rates. Survey participants consisted of 97 community colleges and 1,087 students from across the country. The presenters share survey results and conclusions, including how community colleges will continue to embrace change and seek creative, scalable, repeatable, and measurable means to increase college completion rates.

Wendy Kilgore, Director, Research, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers; Veronica Garcia, President, Northeast Lakeview College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 602, 6th Floor

Administrator Series

There is a great deal of energy and urgency surrounding community college efforts to put in place or strengthen student-success pathways. Numerous national, state, and local initiatives focus on providing students with a clearer understanding of their purpose, as well as their academic and/or career roadmap. The presenters discuss guided pathways models, as well as precision student engagement. In addition, student success outcomes and student experiences are shared.

Virginia Fraire, Vice President, Student Services, Austin Community College; Lori McNabb , Senior Product Training Consultant , Civitas Learning

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

As funding for community colleges at multiple levels continues to decline, creative and alternative funding needs are on the rise. To this end, community college leaders, now more than ever, must have stronger financial acumen, as well as effective fundraising and advancement understanding and skills. During this session, the presenters share successful models, practices, and experiences that support student success, access, and completion.

Steve Head, Chancellor, Lone Star College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 406, 4th Floor

As student success and completion efforts continue to serve as top priorities for community colleges, keeping access and equity central to our work is critical. This session explores how community college leaders are working toward balancing success, assess, and equity through integrated planning, policy, and practice. In addition, session presenters share models, practices, and resources that have increased student success outcomes, while promoting access and equity.

Mark David Milliron, Chief Learning Officer and Co-Founder; Gerardo E. de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Services Team, Civitas Learning

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Today’s ever-evolving learning modalities provide great opportunities to reach a growing population of students that expect us to keep up with their diverse learning needs. Session participants explore these great opportunities to serve students through multiple modalities and discuss the reality that we need to have a much better understanding about how we deliver learning, for whom, and to what end.

Steven Johnson, Chancellor, Western Governors University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

The effectiveness of a community college's culture is often a direct reflection of how well its politics, policy, and change management are integrated within a regional education ecosystem that includes K-12, community colleges, universities, and workforce learning providers. The degree to which these critical and ever-changing dynamics work in support of each other is the difference between shared cultural and political understandings and alignments. The presenters explore and provide examples of strategies for "bringing it all together".

Richard Rhodes, President, Austin Community College; Jacob Fraire, President and Chief Executive Officer, Texas Association of Community Colleges

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Breakout Sessions

Mastery learning is the concept that, given sufficient time, students can learn almost anything. However, students are conditioned to expect a specified performance (i.e., right answer receives an "A") and fixed-learning progression. A 16-week college statistics course assessed students’ stress levels, examined attrition rates, and evaluated learning outcomes in relation to mastery learning. The mixed-methods research showed varying levels of success, identified lessons learned for future classes, and potential avenues for redesigned curricula.

Laura Fry, Executive Special Assistant, Office of the President, Estrella Mountain Community College; Norma Hernandez, Residential Faculty, Psychology, Estrella Mountain Community College; Adam Sanchez, Student, Nursing, Estrella Mountain Community College; Jessica Martinez, Student, Pharmacology, Estrella Mountain Community College; Steffanie Arce, Student, Physical Therapy, Estrella Mountain Community College; Hannah Campbell, Student, Counseling, Estrella Mountain Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Hurricane Harvey rendered 80 percent of the main college a biohazard zone the week before fall classes start. Within 26 days, classes started with a new business plan that transitioned the majority of sections to online courses in a 12-week format. Headcount increased five percent over the previous fall. Preliminary spring headcounts are at a minus one percent. Learn how we accomplished this using our magic file and many community partners.

Katherine Persson, President, Lone Star College–Kingwood; Bridgett Johnson, Vice President Administrative Services, Finance, Lone Star College-Kingwood; David Baty, Vice President, Instruction, Lone Star College-Kingwood; Darrin Rankin, Vice President, Student Services, Lone Star College-Kingwood

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Finding ways to identify at-risk students through timely data is vital. This session provides an insightful look at an innovative and automated way to identify at-risk students. Dropout Detective identifies at-risk students in online and on-campus classes by collecting documentable engagement data that are displayed on a color-coded dashboard. The advisor dashboard and instructor insights are shared.

Stephanie Duguid, Dean, Academic Instruction, Copiah-Lincoln Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Participants in this session learn about best practices for online faculty professional development found in the research-based OLC Online Faculty Professional Development Framework. In addition, ideas for implementing this framework to support and prepare online faculty are shared.

Kaye Shelton, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership, Lamar University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 615A, 6th Floor

Literacy is the product of reading and writing. Using text-based analysis, one program concentrates on vocabulary, sentence structure, and argument analysis and development. Success data show students are successful in skipping courses and accelerating to college-level courses through intensive student-directed activities. A full description of the model includes examples of course documents and activities. Data analysis on student success are included in the presentation.

Robert Grande, Professor, Developmental Education, Blinn College; Pat Westergaard, Dean, Humanities, Blinn College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

The College of Lake County’s Narrative Project is an interdisciplinary effort that uses storytelling to bring awareness to diversity issues on campus. This session demonstrates how faculty members from various disciplines can use the Narrative Project as a rich, active-learning experience for students, faculty, and staff. Come discuss how this strategy can work effectively in most disciplines.

Henna Kittridge, Instructor, English, College of Lake County; Sherry Engstrom, Instructor, Humanities, College of Lake County

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

This session details how one community college introduced 3D technologies to its STEM departments and offered its faculty innovative ways to present essential course concepts. Participants discuss how San Antonio College brought instructors from a wide variety of disciplines together to scan artifacts, sculpt organic shapes, model geographical terrains, and visualize and print their work using inexpensive tools and services.

Aaron Ellis, Academic Program Coordinator, Title III and Creative Multimedia, San Antonio College; Barbara Knotts, Grant Director, Creative Multimedia, San Antonio College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Journey with the facilitators on their quest to better understand the relational challenges posed by dual credit and early-college high school students. The primary perspectives of administrators, educators, counselors, and law enforcement were the focus of the presenters’ study. Participants become keenly aware of the service gaps that impact the total experience of the early-college high school students.

Anthony Williams, Director, Police, Cedar Valley College; William Smith, Adjunct Faculty, Continuing Education, Cedar Valley College; Repaula Tate, Adjunct Faculty, Continuing Education, Cedar Valley College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

Placement tests do not provide a clear-cut assessment of academic readiness. Consequently, students are often placed in developmental education courses that may not be designed to meet their specific needs. Refresher courses at Alamo Colleges District are an intervention designed to assist students move up at least one level from their initial placement. Data provide strong evidence that students who complete a refresher course progress to college-level coursework at an accelerated pace.

Dr. Melissa Guerrero, Assistant Director, Institutional Research, Alamo Colleges District ; Mary Helen Martinez, Director, College and Career Readiness, Alamo Colleges District

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 412, 4th Floor

The sciences are inherently visual. Whether a diagram, chart, graph, or x-ray, visualization is crucial to understanding key concepts. Incorporating opportunities for students to generate their own visual representations allows them to process visual information on a higher level. During this presentation, learn how incorporating drawing into your courses can improve student learning, engagement, and creativity.

James McCaughern-Carucci, Professor, Biological Sciences, St. Johns River State College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

Online classes have become an inescapable reality for most community colleges. However, student success rates can be low, and it can also be difficult to determine how well students are learning course content. In response to these challenges, Madisonville Community College developed a faculty-driven peer review process that fosters increased instructor accountability. Come and discuss a manageable method for assessing course content and measuring student leaning outcomes.

David Schuermer, Director, Grants, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness, Madisonville Community College; Mary Werner, Chair, Humanities, Madisonville Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 400, 4th Floor

According to our 2016-2017 data, we had 1,277 dual-enrolled high school students. Some of our Early College Programs do an activity that provides students what they need to be successful as college students, as well as provides us with a context for providing broader support to prospective students and insight for potential programs. The presenters demonstrate a version of this activity with participants.

Kelli Antonides, Director, Career and College Promise Programs, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Chrystal Brown, Liaison, Early College and CCP, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Angelo Markantonakis, Associate Vice President, Academics, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 412, 4th Floor

“Culturally responsive teaching occurs when there is respect for the backgrounds and circumstances of students regardless of individual status and power and when there is a design for learning that embraces the range of needs, interests, and orientation in the classroom (Ginsberg and Wlodkowski, 2009).” Does your curriculum help students understand the importance of respecting diversity? Join us as we discuss the importance of being a culturally-responsive teacher.

Essie Childers, Professor, Student Success and Reading, Blinn College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 404, 4th Floor

From presidential impressions to punctured lecture and interactive groups to Remind.com, the presenters move students from strangers to partners in learning by surrounding them in the world of the course. Learn how to surround students with a wealth of meaningful activities and resources—tangible and virtual—that make learning about individual empowerment. Free yourself to be authentic with students and not have to always be "in charge."

Cory Colby, Professor and Internship Coordinator, Government and Civic Engagement, Lone Star College–Tomball; Ericka Landry, Faculty Director, Organizational Development, Lone Star College System

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

Faculty development initiatives exist at various levels of higher education institutions. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how local faculty development activities have had a positive impact on practice within a distributed campus environment.

Mike Gillespie, Associate Vice President, Saskatchewan Polytechnic; Desalyn De-Souza, Mentor/Associate Professor/Chair, Child and Family Studies, SUNY Empire State College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

This fun and interactive session is designed for educators who want to connect with the next wave of 21st-century students. We examine the struggles our students face moving from an interactive culture to a one-size-fits-all classroom, after which participants discuss best practices for promoting active learning. Because the classroom is always evolving, the remainder of the presentation focuses on trying to predict the dynamics of the future classroom.

Linda Schmidt, Chair, Mathematics, Spartanburg Community College; Amy Moore, Professor, Mathematics, Spartanburg Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Late enrollment is a consistent problem that puts considerable strain on community college resources. Students who enroll late are unsuccessful at a higher rate than students who enroll before the term starts. The high rate of failure has a significantly negative impact on student financial aid and future loan situations. Data are discussed that support anecdotal evidence. Discussions also explore this phenomenon on participants’ campuses and seek effective solutions for addressing this issue.

Steven Nichols, Instructor, Business Management, Metropolitan Community College; Carley Hunzeker, Instructor, Accounting, Metropolitan Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Highlighting the experiences of nine women who’ve transitioned from faculty into academic leadership, this session prompts discussion and reflection on four essential questions each woman must answer along her journey. Participants explore how their experiences align or differ with the women in the study, as well as what they can share with women leaders who will follow them. This session aims to be a resource for networking, sharing lessons learned, and professional strategy development.

Laura Yannuzzi, Vice President, Instruction, Lone Star College–North Harris

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Third-party industry certifications such as MOUS, ASE, and NATE are commonly offered as industry training for employers. This session introduces engaging strategies used to develop accelerated programs that align with non-credit industry-recognized certifications. The presenters use group activities, online resources, and handouts to share how Eastfield College disseminates Blended Pathway models that expand non-credit certifications into credit-bearing programs that increase industry partnerships, enrollment, and student success.

Tricia Thomas-Anderson, Dean, Resource Development, Eastfield College; Diane Tompkins, Coordinator, Grant Management Services, Eastfield College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Campus Math Communicators provide weekly communication and support for advisors, counselors, and tutoring labs. Since implementing this program, the level of trust and collaboration between math faculty and student services has increased dramatically. Learn details about this program and suggestions for implementing a similar program at your institution, including communication issues, common misconceptions, and methods for bridging the divide.

Carolynn Reed, Chair/Associate Professor, Mathematics, Austin Community College; Kathy James, Director, Academic and Career Advising, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

The rising cost of textbooks is increasingly becoming a barrier for community college students. Through a partnership between our library and communications faculty, we created a free online textbook by using our library databases and internet resources. During this practical session, the presenters share a step-by-step process for building an online textbook using the LibGuide platform and encourage feedback about the content.

Chris Wettstein, Faculty Librarian, Learning Support, Valencia College; Randy Gordon, Professor, English, Valencia College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Much has been written about the disproportionate rate at which African-American students are placed into special education programs at compulsory levels (Blanchett, 2006; Harry and Anderson, 1994; Skiba et al., 2006). However, less is known about this issue at postsecondary levels (Getzel and Thoma, 2008). We’ll explore how the intersection of race and disability impacts the higher education experiences of African-American students at two-year colleges.

William Smith, Associate Dean, Academic Transfer, El Centro College; Anthony James, Assistant Professor, Family Science and Social Work, Miami University; Erin Harper, Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, Miami University; Chia Hong, Graduate Student, Educational Psychology, Miami University

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Ideas that lead to improved results are critical to sustainability and relevance in today’s landscape. Creating a culture of innovation is paramount to making results a reality. Learn how one college is transforming its culture to one of innovation and entrepreneurship. Practical examples and templates for building an Entrepreneurship Center with existing resources, nurturing entrepreneurial mindsets across campus, and designing an innovation process to drive new ways of operating and serving students are shared.

Bryan Woodhouse, Associate Vice President, Strategic Partnerships and Innovation, Madison Area Technical College; Turina Bakken, Provost, Learner Success, Madison Area Technical College; Jill Huizenga, Faculty Director, Center for Entrepreneurship, Madison Area Technical College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Learning how to create an engaging classroom experience for students is challenging, especially when working through the lens of your own discipline. Through interactive instruction, participants are introduced to interdisciplinary collaboration, which can be used to develop creative activities for learners. Participants explore multidimensional classroom activities, discuss interdisciplinary partnerships that enhance the learning experience, and identify ways educators can be paid to build these creative projects.

April Fulton, Nursing, Nursing Residential, Phoenix College; Cameo Hunsaker, Adjunct Faculty, American Sign Language Interpreter Preparation Program, Phoenix College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

As student completion becomes an ever-increasing priority for colleges and universities worldwide, the Alamo Colleges District has begun to examine how to make communication related to the transfer process more seamless. The Transfer Advising Guide Team highlights the steps necessary to construct transfer advising guides as part of the Guided Pathways model, an integrated, institution wide approach that helps students clarify their career and degree goals and the pathways that will help them achieve those goals.

Joseph Duran, Curriculum Analyst, Academic Success, Alamo Colleges District; Angela Guadian-Mendez, Director, Student Completion, Academic Success, Alamo Colleges District; Zak Cernoch, Associate Director, Academic Success, Alamo Colleges District; Stacy Evans, Curriculum Analyst, Academic Success, Alamo Colleges District

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Participants can expect to learn how to administer an interdisciplinary program to improve faculty collaboration across disciplines and educational levels, develop curriculum activities for their discipline courses that are contextual and career motivated, and connect students with potential careers through contextual activities. The presenters share goals and outcomes from their past three years of program experience and coach participants on how to develop a similar program in their own areas of expertise.

Jay Martin, Professor, Mathematics, Wake Tech Community College; Carrie Hoffman, Instructor, Mathematics, Wake Technical Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

There’s no link to the humanities in the Three-Dimensional Learning within the Next Generation Science Standards. The humanities are indispensable to a scientific education because they inspire inquiry, imagination, and innovation. This presentation offers original strategies and methodologies to demonstrate the interconnectedness between the sciences and the humanities.

Anthony Pitucco, Chair (Retired), Physics, Pima Community College; Stewart Barr, Chair (Retired), Humanities, Pima Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Over the past two years, the Spokane Community College Library has evolved from being an underused facility into a vibrant technology-rich space enjoyed by students. Learn how reimagining the library program and working with student government led to “after dark” study parties, a “Library of Things,” and virtual reality spaces. Participants draft a project plan to identify new library service opportunities for their campuses and potential cross-departmental partnerships.

Linda Keys, Faculty Librarian, Library Services, Community Colleges of Spokane; Mary Ann Goodwin, Executive Director, Library Services, Community Colleges of Spokane

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

The presenters describe professional development activities used to support faculty who are creating capstone assignments for community college courses. Creative ways to align course revisions with course and/or program learning outcomes are also discussed. Participants are able to define what a capstone assignment is for various disciplines and examine the alignment of capstone assignments with general education and learning outcomes at their institutions.

Kate Wolfe, Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Social Sciences, Hostos Community College- City University of New York (CUNY); Cynthia Jones, Lecturer, English, Hostos Community College-CUNY; Nelson Nunez-Rodriguez, Professor and Coordinator, Physical Sciences, Hostos Community College-CUNY

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Making the transition from high school to college is not always easy for students. Some students don’t even consider college a possibility. The CARE Academy, a partnership between the college and an ISD, creates a college-going mindset and helps students be college ready upon graduation. Participants learn about the CARE Academy, discuss the college success data for CARE students, and hear about unintended consequences.

Deana Sheppard, Vice President, Student Learning, Lone Star College–CyFair

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

As an instructor, classroom management might be the last part of teaching you want to think about. However, it is actually the first aspect of teaching you should address in order to have a successful class. One important component of classroom management is cultural competency as it relates to the holistic awareness of recognizing your students as individuals. During this session, participants learn about the value of cultural competency in community college classrooms.

Nicholas Vick, Director, Tutorial and Academic Success, Pitt Community College; Jasmin Spain, Assistant Vice President, Student Conduct and Community Standards, Pitt Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Consistently establishing and managing student expectations and behaviors to ensure a productive learning environment are among the most critical issues faced by novice and experienced faculty members. During this session, we’ll move beyond identifying classroom problems and suggest preventative strategies and practical solutions to the most common classroom management problems.

Chelsea Biggerstaff, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

This session focuses on how to consciously communicate with students to promote a more inclusive learning environment. Upon completion of this session, participants are able to identify and understand microaggression and its impact on others, become self-aware of exclusionary behaviors and language, and reduce micro-aggressive communication. Best practices for creating an inclusive learning environment are presented, along with simple and practical applications faculty and staff can implement.

Carla Cole, Associate Professor, History and Political Science, Guilford Technical Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Dr. John Roueche, former Director of The University of Texas’ Community College Leadership Program, discusses the continuing decline in state support for higher education, with particular attention paid to community and technical colleges. Dr. Roueche also shares successful endeavors for building partnerships, cooperatives, and collaborations with community entities that require continuous learning and presents new models of community services.

John Roueche, President, Roueche Graduate Center, National American University

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Community college programs often experience barriers related to silos, access, diversity, and equity when working with other institutions. Because of these common issues, representatives from Austin Community College, Lone Star College, South Plains College, and the Alamo Colleges District collaborated to create an organization that advocates at state and regional levels. This organization has provided our programs with a voice about policy decisions. Participants explore strategies they can implement with their constituents to mobilize advocacy for their students and programs.

Fay Lee, Professor of Education, Teacher Education, Lone Star College System; Giao Phan, Dean of Public and Social Services, Public and Social Services, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Whether in a classroom, team room, meeting room, or boardroom, we all have a desire to maximize the potential for our communications to be memorable, meaningful, engaging, and inspiring. This fun, highly-interactive, and multidimensional learning experience models the elements that make up compelling communication. Learn how to engage listeners and motivate them to action, reflection, and positive development when you speak to any size group!

David Katz III, Executive Director, Organizational Development, Mohawk Valley Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 400, 4th Floor

To encourage community college and university partnerships, this session explores the curriculum and rates of success associated with the Connect to Success program (CTS). CTS was designed by Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical Community College as a bridge, cross-enrollment, and intervention program to address the ever-growing numbers of students who need access to higher education, and to provide options for students placed on academic suspension at the university level.

James Carlson, Associate Provost, Academics, Northshore Technical Community College; Amy Fleming, Chair/Instructor, Liberal Arts and Humanities, Northshore Technical Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 410, 4th Floor

This session provides teachers with strategies that facilitate personalized learning using students’ cell phones. Participants consider various web-based applications that turn students' cell phones into interactive digital notebooks. This session is designed for educators and administrators who want to engage students at the highest level with the instrument that today’s students can’t live without . . . the cell phone.

Marcus Williams, Teacher, Williams Training and Instruction

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

An academic institution cannot innovate on top of chaos. This session explores structure, change management approaches, and how to have immediate gains and long-term stability for an academic institution. Participants discuss maximizing community partnerships, dual enrollment, scheduling, curriculum redesign, and retention strategies. Learn details about strategic focused approaches to data analysis, lessons learned, and suggestions for implementing change at your academic institution.

Angelo Markantonakis, Associate Vice President, Academics, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Debra Neesmith, Associate Vice President, Academic Support, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Mark Roth, Executive Vice President, Florence-Darlington Technical College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 402, 4th Floor

During this session, participants learn about the purpose of administrators at public minority serving institutions and the critical necessity for maintaining consistent leadership. Participants engage in exercises that place emphasis on the importance of adhering to mission, implementation, and execution of the strategic plan; understanding governing board structures; understanding budgets; and succession planning. Hiring the right people for the institution is the first step toward success.

Dr. Sharron Herron-Williams, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs, Southern University at Shreveport Louisiana

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

The world has changed in ways that now require everyone to think like an entrepreneur, no matter their discipline. Graduates need to learn how to create value by solving problems for others regardless of whether they work for an existing organization, create something new, or contribute to the gig economy. By embracing an entrepreneurial mindset, students cultivate the problem-solving, critical-thinking, collaboration, and resiliency skills needed to succeed in the 21st Century.

Gary Schoeniger, Founder/CEO, The Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Using a Fast Start grant from the Texas Workforce Commission, Texas State Technical College is developing new online, competency-based courses for our Architectural Design and Engineering Graphics program. The presenters share the design process used to create the courses, including demonstrating the tools created to guide course developers. Participants practice using these tools to plan the assessment and practice activities and instruction necessary to master these tasks.

Randall Garver, Instructional Designer, Online Learning, Texas State Technical College; David Campos, Statewide Division Director, Architectural Drafting and Land Surveying, Texas State Technical College; Samuel Pizano, Instructor, Drafting and Design Tech, Texas State Technical College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Participants in this breakout session learn how to improve upon their students' literacy skills by using hands-on activities that center around encouraging social justice. From determining what is or isn't considered deviant behavior to reading and responding to hot topics using videos, participants leave with a multitude of ready-to-use ideas that can help open students' eyes to the need to be open and accepting of their peers.

Sonja Greiner, Professor, Reading, Arizona Western College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 402, 4th Floor

College mathematics departments are facing increased pressures to streamline course sequences, create pathways that align with students’ goals, and improve outcomes. Co-requisite and accelerated models are important options in this landscape. Learn about curriculum and program development strategies that reflect research-based principles of effective mathematics. Hear about strategies derived from faculty-led efforts to develop co-requisite and accelerated versions of Carnegie’s Statway and Quantway. Leave with course redesign strategies and evidence of how these models impact student success.

Yolanda Manzano, Professor, Mathematics, Richland College; Karon Klipple, Senior Project Director, Carnegie Math Pathways, WestEd

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

The presentation focuses on the importance of creating clear explanations in online courses so students are able to understand the content. Participants discuss how scaffolding instruction can build a base of understanding regarding what’s expected, which enables more students to successfully complete assignments. Examples are provided to generate ideas about how improved course instruction can maximize student learning outcomes and increase course completion rates.

Peter Cronrath, Instructor, Business, Culinary Arts, and Hospitality, Hudson County Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Participants discuss faculty development best practices. Since 1998, St. Philip’s College’s Master Teacher Certification Program has helped new and experienced faculty members engage in reflective and creative exercises to improve their own teaching. This session describes the eight-week long hybrid program that’s offered twice each year and examines the success of the faculty who completed the program.

Luis Lopez, Director, Instructional and Professional Development, St. Philip's College; Audrey Mosley, Faculty, Speech, St. Philip's College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

The four pillars of student engagement and motivation break down differentiated instruction into a manageable practice using techniques that build rapport with students. This session provides student engagement and motivation techniques that break down differentiated instruction into a manageable practice so it becomes an addition to the wonderful lessons that teachers develop.

Cyndee Kawalek, Trainer and Consultant, Education , Cyndee's Teacher Training

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Made popular by Angela Duckworth's book of the same name, grit—seen as crucial in determining one’s success and failure—refers to how individuals confront life’s challenges and setbacks. During this session, participants discuss ways to nurture resiliency and motivation in students in a Learning Frameworks course (i.e., Catch the Next). Participants take the “How Gritty Are You?” survey, learn what grit is, and learn how to apply “parent-like” guidance to develop their students’ passion and perseverance.

Daniel Rodriguez, Professor, Education, Palo Alto College; Yolanda Reyna, Associate Professor, Education, Palo Alto College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

It’s 2018 and everything around the world has improved. Everything that is, except all-campus email messages, which are stuck in 1995. What if you could improve your messages, use technology in new ways, and engage your audience in their work. Come see how generational preferences, email newsletters, social media, and storytellers result in more effective communication strategies across campus.

Esteban (Steve) Sosa, Dean, E-Learning, Instructional Support, and Professional Development, Mountain View College; Rebecca McDowell, Director, Organizational and Staff Development, Mountain View College; Jennifer McGuire, Instructional Technologist, Distance Education and Instructional Support, Mountain View College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 619, 6th Floor

Recent meteoric increases in the use of drones have occurred in a remarkably short period of time. The reality is that there are many gray areas when interpreting the regulations and academic possibilities for drone-related courses and programs. Learn about what the current academic, local, state, and federal regulations are for implementing or continuing a drone course or program at your institution. Also learn about the legal and risk management implications associated with drone-related courses and programs.

Richard Parra, Faculty, Aviation/Psychology, Nash Community College; Vernon Hawkins, Associate Vice President, Workforce and Continuing Education, Brookhaven College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Do you ever feel like you’re herding cats in the classroom when trying to maintain an orderly, respectful, inclusive, and motivating learning environment? The presenter shares time-tested principles supported by current neuroscience. We “walk the talk” as we explore ways we can foster, sustain, and experience a lively, engaged, orderly, empowering, and compelling learning environment. The goal is for you to have fun while we help each other learn!

David Katz III, Executive Director, Organizational Development, Mohawk Valley Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Consistent use of a rubric provides necessary performance data. However, getting faculty on board can be challenging. Explore differences in rubrics, examine options that encourage faculty to use rubrics as scoring guides, and learn the pitfalls to avoid. Participants engage in one approach that makes developing and using rubrics more appealing, meaningful, and useful for faculty and assessment professionals. Join this session to try your hand at being a rubric wiz!

Karen Pain, Assessment Director, Institutional Research and Effectiveness, Palm Beach State College; Laura Clouse, Professor, English, Palm Beach State College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 408, 4th Floor

This session involves effective models for teaching social entrepreneurship to high school students in the Philippines. The Teenpreneur Challenge is a multisector model for teaching social entrepreneurship to high school students. It is an annual competition during which students help micro entrepreneurs improve their livelihood. The Katipunan Fund Drive is a fundraising activity that was turned into a social-enterprise training for high school students.

John Frederick Lauron, Teacher, Special Education, Sierra High School

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 615B, 6th Floor

Today's students have many outside distractions and barriers that often make being engaged in the learning process stressful and difficult. We can reduce their anxiety by practicing and teaching mindfulness, which is the art of being in the moment. Educators who practice mindfulness create a supportive climate and environment where students are ready to engage and learn. Additionally, we can improve student outcomes by teaching mindful metacognition and deconstructing thoughts and perceptions in the moment.

Erin Gomez, Adjunct, Communication, Prairie State College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Participants engage in accountability activities using Partners in Leadership Oz Principles. Since accountability is a personal choice to demonstrate ownership, participants self-evaluate their levels of accountability and demonstrate the concepts needed to improve and create best practices. With interdependence and joint accountability, participants learn how Richland Community College created a culture of change by building a foundation and applying feedback methodology.

Jarmese Sherrod, Professor, Developmental English, Richland Community College; Evyonne Hawkins, Professor, Education and African American Studies, Richland Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Get ready to turn your course into an innovative information exchange! Learn how using Voice Thread provides a platform where students are engaged, learning is interactive, and faculty feedback is rich and meaningful. The presenter showcases examples of real assignments used in online, on campus, and flipped classrooms. If you’ve been looking for ways to take your course to the next level, then this session is for you!

Donna Hanks, Faculty, Business and Technology, Western Dakota Tech

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

In 2013, the presenter and her team built a faculty onboarding program using an LMS. In 2015, they achieved 100 percent faculty retention. Our effective, personalized onboarding process was essential to our employee retention success. Adjunct faculty were not only able to begin teaching with a strong organizational foundation and connection, they also entered the classroom and student environment grounded in personal experience with all of the assignment types they use.

Kacey Ingram Jechura, Dean, Education/Consultant , CollegeAmerica

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Come learn how the STEM undergraduate research program at San Antonio College increased participation among underrepresented minorities in STEM, including how the program saw a two-fold increase in female STEM student participation. Discuss how the research program grew from one project a semester to more than five a semester. Also discuss how to effectively assess and engage students.

Dee Dixon, Senior Student Success Advisor, Engineering, San Antonio College; Barbara Knotts, Grant Director, Creative Multimedia, San Antonio College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 615A, 6th Floor

Building college students’ personal finance skills is important to their overall success. This session teaches you how to better understand your students’ needs and how to customize your financial literacy programming accordingly to address those needs. This session also covers existing academic and market research into the financial behaviors of young adults. Participants leave with a better understanding of how to personalize financial education to address their students’ needs.

Amy Conrad, Program Director, CashCourse, National Endowment for Financial Education

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Exponential growth and rapid development in the technology marketplace has outpaced teaching and learning practices in community colleges. How do we instill an entrepreneurial mindset and impart practical skills to meet the needs of employers when technology is changing so quickly? How do we synchronize curriculum and instruction with technology lifecycles to empower students to lead the change? Come discuss an inspired strategy that integrates leading-edge technologies into the classroom and across campus.

Caroline Hamilton, Associate Professor, Biology, Tarrant County College District; Michael Kaluya, Professor, Economics, Tarrant County College; Eli Mercer, Dean, Division of Health, Business and Technology, Tarrant County College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Have you ever sat through an endless faculty meeting that seemed to have no real purpose? Don’t put your students through the same suffering! Engaging students in the learning process increases their focus, improves their critical-thinking skills, and helps them become invested in their learning. They (and you) will also have a lot more fun. Join this session to build your arsenal of engaging teaching strategies.

Farrell Jenab, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Johnson County Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Established in 2017, the Alamo Colleges’ Faculty Development department provides programming that promotes districtwide teaching goals while responding to the needs of individual colleges. Informed by this experience, this session helps participants identify best practices in starting a faculty development program from scratch while balancing between the twin goals of building a centralized program and providing individualized services. Participants develop plans to create or improve their own faculty development programs.

William Duffy, Faculty Fellow, Faculty Development, Alamo Colleges District ; Carmen Mercedez, Director, Faculty Development, Alamo College District; Susan Cotellesse, Faculty Fellow, Northeast Lakeview College, Alamo Colleges District ; Kevin Ann Kelsmark, Faculty Development Lead, Faculty Development, Alamo Colleges District

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

As faculty, staff, and administrators, you are an everyday superhero! You possess the power to influence and impact students in ways that not only improves their lives, but the lives of their families as well. Come participate in group and individual activities during this entertaining session that will have you laughing out loud as we explore ways to connect with, energize, and inspire your students and colleagues.

Kevin Tutt, Partner, Tutt and Daggs Creative Performance Improvement

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Connection inspires trust, motivates hard work, and generates positive momentum. Most people respond to how communicators make them feel rather than what they say. Learning how to identify and relate to all types of learners in a way that increases your influence with them is critical to student success. Drawing from current brain development research, this session presents principles that are critical for effective communication, as well as strategies that engage today’s college learners.

Nicole Rankine, Next Generation Speaker, Teacher, and Coach, John Maxwell Team

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 414, 4th Floor

The primary focus of education is to enhance student learning and student satisfaction for the 21st Century. To foster a learning community that ensures diversity, equity, and inclusion, it is essential to explore how faculty diversity (i.e., culture, gender, values, beliefs, and cognitive processes) impacts students. Additionally, it is important to design a curriculum that inspires, engages, challenges, and prepares diverse students for the 21st Century.

Theresa West, Instructor, Business Technology, Albany Technical College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Motivation is an area of study in higher education vital to addressing student engagement and persistence. Students who have self-determination are more likely to stay in school to complete their programs. This session focuses on various components of self-determination theory. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation are explored as they apply to two-year college students in particular.

John Etienne, Director, Computer Education, St. Johns River State College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 619, 6th Floor

Come discuss Hudson County Community College's (HCCC) innovative partnerships with high schools and universities that begin in middle school. Students benefit from dual enrollment and concurrent courses and programs that take them well down the college path while still in high school. The pathways extend well beyond HCCC's gates and into universities for shared programs and services.

Eric Friedman, Senior Vice President, Academic Affairs, Hudson County Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 408, 4th Floor

This session explores best practices for creating faculty credential guidelines pertaining to regional program accreditation. During a recent reaffirmation, St. Philip’s College provided multiple faculty justifications, preventable with comprehensive credential documentation. A team created this documentation, ensuring that the clearly defined hiring process and other practices were documented. This institutional manual serves as starting point in the faculty hiring process. Quality educational instruction and compliance are further supported through continuous faculty development opportunities.

Jack Nawrocik, Assistant Professor of Humanities & History Coordinator/Scheduler Social & Behavioral Sciences Faculty Assistant to the VPAS, Social and Behavioral Sciences, St. Philip's College; Shanna Bradford, Administrative Assistant, Institutional, Planning, Research, and Effectiveness, St. Philip's College; Blanca Cuellar, Coordinator, Health Sciences Quality Assurance, St. Philip's College; Randall Dawson, Vice President of Academic Success, Academic Success, St. Philip’s College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Newly-hired college instructors are often content experts; however, delivering content to adult learners to satisfy course-specific learning outcomes may be a new experience. Participants consider a framework useful for creating daily lesson plans that accomplish course-learning outcomes, incorporate actionable assessment, effectively use instructional time, and engage adult learners.

Valery Keibler, Director, Professional Development , Community College of Allegheny County

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Participants in this session learn about five professional development programs that increase participation by community college faculty and staff. Each program’s implementation, logistics, and best practices are shared. Participants are able to identify whether their campus can support each program, as well as strategies to modify each program to accommodate their campus culture. How to cultivate motivation strategies and gain support from each department are also discussed.

Kentrie LeDee, Program Manager, Center for Organizational and Teaching Excellence, Lone Star College–Tomball

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

The Faculty Values Project was a year-long collaboration that brought faculty together to draft a statement of values that would inform new faculty-focused issues like onboarding, faculty development, and evaluation. During this discussion, you’ll hear how facilitated discussions empowered faculty to develop a blueprint for a successful faculty member at this institution. Participants leave with the ability to plan a similar process at their institutions.

Suzanne Summers, Professor, History, Austin Community College; Meryl Patterson, Assistant Dean and Professor, Faculty Development and Psychology, Austin Community College; Susan Thomason, Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 412, 4th Floor

In “Completing College: Rethinking Institutional Action,” Vincent Tinto writes that institutions must “invest in faculty development.” This responsibility is often handled by an individual, small office, or committee. How can these isolated programs support a college with limited resources? The presenters share an interinstitutional mentoring community of practice (MCoP) model for sharing operational knowledge and strategies for increasing faculty engagement. This session offers an overview about how to create and sustain a MCoP.

Donna Seagle, Professor, Psychology/Director, Center for Academic Research and Excellence , Academic Affairs , Chattanooga State Community College ; Dallas Dolan, Assistant Dean, Faculty Training and Development, The Community College of Baltimore County, Maryland; Mary Carney, Professor & Director, English Department and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership, University of North Georgia

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Combining a center for adjunct faculty engagement with a center for innovative instruction was the first step in a series of programmatic changes that have fostered an institutional culture that emphasizes the inclusion of all faculty and garners more reflective and intentional practice. In the new academy, existing programs have been modified and new ones created to enhance the focus on collaborative relationships, scholarship, reflection, and implementation. Explore successes and challenges of the inclusive, innovative model.

Stephanie Whalen, Chair, The Academy for Teaching Excellence, Harper College; Michael Bates, Dean, The Academy for Teaching Excellence, Harper College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

For over 70 years, The Fulbright Program has fostered mutual understanding by connecting faculty, administrators, and students in the U.S. and around the world. Fulbright has influenced teaching outcomes, research paths, and career trajectories of individual participants, and has had a significant impact on U.S. campuses. This session provides insights into Fulbright opportunities available for community college faculty and administrators, including teaching, conducting research, and participating in collegial consultations at more than 125 countries.

Sarah Causer, Officer, Institutional Engagement , Institute of International Education

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

Game design principles have been used to improve semester-to-semester retention by institutions such as Ball State University. However, that success takes more than the liberal use of badges and leaderboards; it takes a deliberate strategy. During this session, participants learn about the Game Design for Student Success model, the six basic building blocks of game design, and how to apply these strategies to completion and transfer pathways.

Candis Best, CEO, Learningateway

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Do you want to get students more engaged in your lectures? Following a quick review of Multiple Intelligence Theory, we'll participate in collaborative-learning exercises that can increase the energy level in the classroom. Be more student-centered in your approach to teaching. Attend this session to learn easy-to-execute college teaching techniques!

Sean Glassberg, Director, Faculty Development , Horry Georgetown Technical College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Discuss a model between The University of Texas’ National Resource Centers (NRCs) and Austin Community College and learn how to connect with NRCs in your area that can support global learning in your classroom. Also learn how faculty learning communities can support these efforts. Discover ideas for integrating global sustainable development goals or the Declaration of Human Rights into your teaching and leave with concrete ideas for globalizing your curriculum.

Lindsey Engelman, Coordinator, Public Engagement, The University of Texas at Austin; Meryl Patterson, Assistant Dean and Professor, Faculty Development and Psychology, Austin Community College; Jill Bosche, Assistant Professor, English, Austin Community College; Michelle Crabtree, Assistant Professor, Adult Education and ESL, Austin Community College; Rodney Rose, Associate Professor, Biology, Austin Community College; William Hayden, Director, International Programs, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 616A, 6th Floor

This is Gallup StrengthsFinder as you have never seen it before. Participants explore how North Lake College uses strengths-based development to approach key topics such as self-awareness, work-life balance (or integration), service, and team development. Following this session, participants are able to reimagine the application of strength themes as a framework for a new, personalized approach to common professional development topics.

Arturo Ozuna, Director, Wildfire Institute of Professional Development, North Lake College; Andrea Ziehm, Program Manager, Wildfire Institute, North Lake College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

On many campuses, faculty professional development coordinators and librarians share similar responsibilities—providing access to resources, facilitating learning, and supporting the pursuit of knowledge. What avenues open for faculty members when the faculty professional development coordinator is a librarian? View faculty development through the lens of critical library pedagogy, discuss how 21st century literacies can inform practice, and identify opportunities for collaboration between academic libraries and teaching and learning centers during this lively and interactive session.

Jennifer Kelley, Reference Librarian/ Coordinator, Library and Professional Development, College of DuPage

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

This session supports your college's ongoing implementation of alternatives to college Algebra paths. We present an adaptable means to fully populate your options, including designing malleable preparatory sequences, identifying student advisement nodes, and offering strategies that address the challenges associated with changing student goals. Northwest Vista College Math faculty now successfully supports better prepared students and the college has more than doubled its three-year graduation rate.

Anna Harwin, Faculty, Mathematics, Northwest Vista College; Eddie Bishop, Coordinator, Developmental Mathematics, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 408, 4th Floor

This session provides links to free faculty development modules to upskill industry professionals transitioning to teaching. Content in the interactive modules progress from basic job responsibilities (i.e., writing a syllabus and managing the classroom) to topics such as faculty evaluation, accreditation, advisory groups, accessibility, and accommodations. Modules can be imported into learning management systems for online and on-campus courses or used independently in face-to-face or self-study training.

Brenda Perea, Ambassador, SkillsCommons, California State University-Long Beach; Karen Cowel, Dean (Retired), Nursing, Antelope Valley College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

Uncover how to overcome the culture of slow, stop, and wait that are prevalent at so many colleges. Acquire the techniques needed to build relentless program momentum by actively engaging with a variety of internal and external stakeholders, students, other academic institutions in your area, as well as the local entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Beth Kerly, Professor, Business, Hillsborough Community College; Andrew Gold, Professor, Business, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

There is strong research that shows service learning can increase the academic success of college students. Research also shows that humans learn best by teaching others. What if you married the two findings? How could this marriage be used to teach servant leadership? During this presentation, participants discuss the current research on service learning and explore the process of organizing community education through service learning academic courses.

Kari Reyburn, Coordinator, Community Engagement , Western Technical College; Cindy Prindle, Instructor, Business, Western Technical College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

In 2017, guided pathways moved from a somewhat vague and debated theory to a full-blown movement. While most colleges have a guided pathways strategy, only 23 percent of presidents say that their college has been effective in actually moving in this direction. Join us to learn how the most progressive colleges are using technology to ensure pathways success and, in the interim, are achieving key performance gains like a 16 percent increase in the applicant-to-enrollee conversion rate.

Lindsey Klein, Managing Director,  Business Development and Community College Market , EAB

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 615A, 6th Floor

Higher education today is evolving, and its population is like a tapestry where students come to us with different skills set, strengths, knowledge base, and challenges. Today, colleges can be intentional and relational in their approach in catering to students’ academic, social, and personal needs. Come to this session and discuss unique steps you can take to increase the success rate for all students.

Lara Akinyemi, Adjunct Faculty/Special Programs Coordinator, Academic Affairs, Bristol Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

During this session, experience how Houston Community College's Media Arts and Technology Center of Excellence collaborated with college operations to advance equity and inclusivity by developing a student engagement model centered on integrated outreach efforts, strategic inquiry, intentional advising, cross-discipline collaboration, and career services.

Jimmy Adams, Dean, Media Arts and Technology Center of Excellence, Houston Community College; Destry Dokes, Officer, College Operations, Houston Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Connecting learners to the workforce involves not only teaching skills and competencies, but helping students effectively share what they can do for employers. Instructors can help students bridge this communication gap by making skills and abilities transparent with digital badges, while also improving outcomes for employers and institutions. The presenters share best practices for creating employer-focused credentials through cross-sector partnerships informed by the Colorado Community College System and others.

Brenda Perea, Director, Educational and Workforce Solutions , Credly; Hope Kandel, Director, Business Development , Credly

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

During this session, we challenge participants to develop regional alliances that include two-year institutions, four-year institutions and other partners to create and enhance existing faculty development programs. Using career-pathway survey results, we help participants identify the building blocks for an alliance by emphasizing the need for collective impact perspectives. We also offer recommendations for improving faculty development programs so future and current faculty are better prepared to educate the new student majority.

Julia Savoy, Assistant Researcher, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin - Madison; Craig Ogilvie, Assistant Dean, Professor, Graduate College, Iowa State University

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Lorain County Community College (LCCC) created the SAIL program based on the City University of New York's Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP). The evaluation of ASAP found unprecedented positive impacts on students' academic outcomes. This comprehensive program has improved LCCC students' persistence and credit accumulation rates. Come learn about this exciting program and important research findings.

Matthew Mercado, Enrollment, Financial and Career Services, Lorain County Community College; Camielle Headlam, Research Analyst, MDRC

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Learn how to engage your students with classroom activities to illustrate economic concepts such as supply and demand, shortages and surpluses, international trade, and applying fiscal and monetary policy.

Alexandra Shiu, Professor, Economics, McLennan Community College; Stan Mitchell, Professor, Economics, McLennan Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Edmonds Community College has transformed how it supports students in STEM fields to include a STEM-specific welcome/orientation, social events and workshops, a STEM student support staff member, wrap-around academic support, and a STEM study room. Learn how the program was implemented and discuss success data that show higher GPAs, higher persistence rates, and quicker degree attainment. Come and discuss what aspects of this effort could be added to your STEM pathways.

Deann Leoni, Faculty, Mathematics, Edmonds Community College; Tom Fleming, Faculty, Physics, Edmonds Community College; Nate Goodman, Student Support and Retention Specialist, STEM, Edmonds Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

60 percent of high school graduates are underprepared for the rigors of college, and the college readiness gap is felt even more strongly within two-year institutions. By adding simple strategies into lessons, teachers help students increase their writing skills, as well as their confidence in their writing ability. Strategies include journals, prewriting and revising activities, and questionnaires that target students' assumptions about their writing skills. The strategies discussed are easily adapted for any writing emphasis course.

Debby Meyer, Adjunct Instructor, English, Communications, and History, Pensacola State College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

Chattanooga State Community College’s IT Department conducted IT Entrepreneurship projects in its System Analysis and Design course. Eight teams of students conducted research and presented their IT Entrepreneurship projects. Students brainstormed how to start an IT company from scratch, including creating marketing materials, organization charts, budgets, project timeline, database, and website. Five judges participated from local companies.

Savitha Pinnepalli, Head/Assistant Professor, Information Technology, Chattanooga State Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Bring your laptop and dive into a hands-on session that provides creative ways to engage your students by using G-Suite for Education. Create branching tutorials and visual quizzes using Google Forms. Increase student engagement through collaborative class projects with Google Docs, Spreadsheets, and Slides, or create student portfolios using Google Sites. The possibilities are endless. Whether you are just starting out or a G-Suite pro, there is something for you here!

Heather Voran, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Amarillo College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Community colleges students can benefit by getting introduced to basic-level research activities. Nanotechnology is related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and has greatly impacted humans by improving drug delivery, decreasing pollution, and introducing novel electronics. This session introduces nanotechnology-related research activities at Elgin Community College.

Soma Chattopadhyay, Adjunct Professor, Physics and Engineering, Elgin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

This session helps identify triggers and healthy de-escalation models that can be used in the classroom. Discussed are students’ psychological well-being and how to effectively deal with crisis in the classroom. Participants gain knowledge that can be used to provide support and aid in removing the stigma of mental illness in the classroom.

Kamara Taylor, Assistant Professor, Psychology, Finlandia University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

In this highly engaging and interactive session, participants learn how it’s everyone's responsibility—from the groundskeeper to the president—to engage students at every opportunity at their institution. By discussing principles highlighted in No Greater Odds and national service excellence examples, participants discuss ways faculty, staff, and administration can engage students on a daily basis through interactions and services to promote a welcoming and inviting culture.

Charlene Gibson, Coordinator, Instructor and Faculty Initiatives, College of Southern Nevada

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 615B, 6th Floor

The ability to effectively work in teams and to serve as a leader are two of the many skills students need. Teaching teamwork can be very stressful and can make you feel like you have little control in the classroom. This session focuses on how to help students form a strong chain so their group work is successful. Participants use leadership strategies based on the game Barrel of Monkeys.

Elizabeth McKinley, Professor, Business and Accounting, San Jacinto College - South; Lambrini Nicopoulos, Professor, Biology, San Jacinto College - South

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Austin Community College has implemented several major course overhauls in the past 10 years. This presentation addresses the challenges, victories, and lessons learned from the course redesign process. Examples include a recently completed five-year Quality Enhancement Plan to incorporate collaborative activities into developmental math courses, the creation of individually-paced emporium-style developmental math classes in the nation’s largest computer lab, and brand new “math express” co-requisite classes that combine developmental and college-level content.

Christy Dittmar, Associate Professor, Mathematics, Austin Community College; Anne Vance, Associate Professor and Assistant Chair, Mathematics, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Project Math Paths was created to offer students faster, more relevant pathways that help them meet their math requirements. A partnership between the math and advising departments developed as training needs increased as a result of more pathways being created, as well as state-mandated changes being implemented in developmental math. The math-advising partnership has grown and components of this partnership have been recognized by the Dana Center as a best practice.

Heidi Hunt, Professor, Mathematics, Northwest Vista College; Christina Brown, Director, Academic Advising, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Project Math Paths was created to offer students faster, more relevant pathways that help them achieve their math requirement. Opening more pathways created a need to provide training to faculty, advisors, students, and administrators. A Monopoly-like game was created to make students aware of their math options. However, faculty from other departments, advisors, and administrators have also benefited from playing the game!

Heidi Hunt, Professor, Mathematics, Northwest Vista College; Eddie Bishop, Professor, Mathematics, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 404, 4th Floor

Discover ways to wake up your students and engage them in their learning. The presenters demonstrate various techniques used in the classroom to promote an active-learning environment. The strategies focus on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning framework to increase students’ higher levels of thinking. These tools used in our classrooms are easy and proven effective by participatory and cooperative learning experts and featured in Teach Students How to Learn.

Thermajean Jones, Academic Program Coordinator, Health Sciences, St. Philip's College; Lydia Ortega, Faculty, Economics, St. Philip's College; Tunetha Parchem, Faculty and Program Director, Health Sciences, St. Philip's College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 616A, 6th Floor

Mobile devices can detract from the traditional lecture format, but they also present opportunities for greater student engagement. Participants examine the lessons one instructor, accustomed to the traditional lecture format, acquired as a result of a mobile devices initiative at his college. These lessons include using online tools and apps to assess in-class student learning of course content, collaborative learning to foster student engagement, and empirical observation of best practices.

David Toye, Professor, History, Northeast State Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 619, 6th Floor

During this session, participants review relevant research, discuss how specific reading strategies enhance writing across content areas, and practice those strategies using texts from core discipline areas. Participants will leave eager and ready to engage their students.

Camille Holmes, Instructor, Academic Transfer, El Centro College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Come learn about the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, a great source of community college funding and free STEM classroom resources! For 25 years the ATE program has promoted community college innovation and workforce development and supported and built partnerships between academic institutions and employers. Join staff from ATE Central to discuss this NSF funding opportunity and learn about its outcomes and impacts.

Rachael Bower, Director, Internet Scout Research Group , University of Wisconsin-Madison

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 615A, 6th Floor

Bossier Parish Community College’s mobile-friendly application of its “Open Campus” OER desktop model, funded by a U.S. Department of Education “First in the World” grant, has undergone extensive randomized control trials in developmental math and English courses, and the results are in. Underprepared students can be motivated to persist when online learning incorporates brain science design in an on-demand environment. Participants view a “live” course, get the quantitative/qualitative evidence of success, and learn about the project’s timelines, considerations, and pitfalls.

Allison Martin, Director, Institutional Effectiveness Initiatives, Bossier Parish Community College; Matt Giani, Research Scientist, Strategy and Policy, The University of Texas at Austin; Begona Mira, Professor, Computer Information Systems, Northwestern State University of Louisiana 

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

The Open Education Initiative Faculty Fellowship Program supports faculty innovation and adoption of OER. Participants discuss the benefits and challenges associated with librarians serving as campus OER leaders and advocates. Learn about how a librarian created and facilitates the Faculty Fellowship Program, lessons learned, and capturing success data.

Ellen Pratt, Librarian, Distance Education and Outreach, Mount Wachusett Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Supporting community college students through effective advising in the first year is crucial to their long-term success. Joliet Junior College First-Year Experience Advisors use intentional efforts to improve the persistence and retention of new students. Learn how we use technology and other innovative non-office advising practices to reach out and advise students in their first year. Explore ways to implement on-the-go advising practices at your institution.

Sasah Richardson, Coordinator, First-Year Experience, Joliet Junior College; Brittany Burton, Transfer Specialist, First-Year Experience, Joliet Junior College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

This session informs and equips participants for impacting cognitive and affective growth through the implementation of high-engagement instructional practices in adult education. Participants model and discuss a matrix of high-engagement strategies that support students’ college experiences by integrating advising into guided pathways.

Leticia Farrera, Specialist/Instructor, Adult Education Advising and Recruitment , Austin Community College; Rachel Juarez-Torres, Program Manager, Education, AVID

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

Join us to discuss Baltimore P-TECH schools, innovative grade 9 to 14 public schools with clear pathways from high school to college and careers. In six years or less, students graduate with a high school diploma and a no-cost associate’s degree. Each P-TECH school works with industry partners and a local community college to ensure an up-to-date curriculum that is academically rigorous and economically relevant.

Tonja Ringgold, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Baltimore City Community College; Michael Thomas, Vice President, Workforce Development and Continuing Education, Baltimore City Community College; Brittany Stephens, P-TECH Early College Liaison, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Baltimore City Community College; Lori Bush, P-TECH Carver School Principal, Baltimore City Public Schools, P-TECH Carver High School

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 400, 4th Floor

There is currently a great deal of discussion among higher education faculty, staff, and administrators about guided pathways. A pathway must always produce the desired outcome in order to meet the needs of students and strengthen the economic impact of the community. This session presents supplements that help maintain strength, relevance, and vitality to pathways.

Joseph Roche, Dean, Instruction, Metropolitan Community Colleges - KC; Jackie Gill, President, Blue River and Business and Technology Campuses, Metropolitan Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 415A, 4th Floor

A 24-year U.S. Naval Training Officer and current Professional Development Coordinator explains how to FLIP your professional development mentality. Learn how and why your professional development should be leading you on an upward trajectory. Participants gain an understanding about how individual development plans, evaluations, networking, courses, workshop and conference attendance, and specialized training not only increase skill-sets, but are also stepping stones to the future. Designed for faculty and staff, this presentation provides the tools necessary to succeed!

Alan Chace, Coordinator, Professional Development, Cape Cod Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

The Reconnect Now program is a last-dollar scholarship that provides qualified adult learners with the opportunity to attend college tuition-free. Participants learn how Pellissippi State Community College created the program and the lessons learned in piloting the program within the state. Alternative scheduling, online courses, and student support services are discussed. Come participate in a guided exercise that explores options for creating a similar program at your institution.

Linda Reeves, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Biology and Adult Student Success, Pellissippi State Community College; Leigh Touzeau, Assistant Vice President, Enrollment Services, Pellissippi State Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Learn successful strategies for reaching out to underrepresented populations and others through engaging, hands-on activities in lasers, robotics, biotech, and other advanced technologies. The Midwest Photonics Education Center shares best practices and lessons learned from four innovative activities including a Women Exploring STEM Day, a Latino Photonics Workshop, a Summer Technology Camp, and a College Immersion Experience. Each activity has a different timeframe and design suitable for various audiences.

Greg Kepner, Director, Midwest Photonics Education Center, Indian Hills Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

The focus of this project is to design a shorter path through developmental reading and writing classes so students can enroll in credit-bearing classes when they acquire the required mastery level. By combining reading and writing classes in shortened semesters and providing them online, students gain the needed skills with less time and money than is required for non-credit classes, while increasing student matriculation and satisfaction.

Elizabeth Terranova, Assistant Chair/Instructor, English and Communications, Lake-Sumter State College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Most faculty members have heard the phrase, "Active learning is more effective than lecturing." Active and engaged strategies enhance learning, but this does not mean that lectures should be eliminated. During this session, participants explore the essential criteria that must be present for learning to occur, as well as when lectures are effective and not effective. Participants then identify simple strategies that include active learning in ways that increase learning.

Todd Zakrajsek, Associate Professor, Family Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 616A, 6th Floor

Participants learn about and practice scientific method techniques developed in the News Literacy Project and the New York Times Knowledge Network for amassing data and determining emergent reliability or "truth value" in a world where news feeds are continuous and reliability is questionable. Critical-thinking discernment practices are presented and discussed and the scientific method-style analysis is applied to real and fake news.

Katherine Watson, Professor, Distance Learning, Coastline Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

One thing is certain about endorphins: They provide pain relief and help reduce stress. Learn how Butler County Community College launched an opioid initiative to help its community by using a revolutionary approach to opioid addiction and recovery. The presenters use science and easily understood analogies to explain the endorphin connection in recovery.

Tracy Hack, Director, Community Leadership Initiatives, Butler Community College; Steve Treu, Licensed Therapist, Author, and Instructor, Workforce Development and Career Training, Butler County Community College/Quantum Revolution Counseling

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

The benefits of using group activities cannot be overemphasized. However, these activities do have some shortcomings. One shortcoming of group activities is that they can result in an imbalance in work assignments among group members. The aim of this session is to address the shortcomings of group activities using hybrid classroom assessments. This strategy allows students to work together, even though each student is held accountable for their own responsibilities.

Abidemi Akinloye, Instructor, Business, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology; Olayemi Olabiyi, Instructor, Business, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

Often at national conferences, participants from large institutions with big budgets explain their plans for improvement. Often, participants from smaller, less-funded colleges leave without much useful information. Cape Cod Community College has built a professional development program with long-term sustainability and little fiscal or manpower support. Learn the tricks to doing what we did for faculty and staff development on a shoestring!

Alan Chace, Coordinator, Professional Development, Cape Cod Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 402, 4th Floor

This session covers creative solutions to solving one of the biggest challenges seen in our education system—the cybersecurity skills gap. With more than a million unfilled jobs, unqualified employees, and a skills gap that's growing rapidly, traditional education and workforce development (including certifications) failed in solving the problem. The session focuses on accelerated-learning and hands-on education technologies (Simulabs) tested in the 8200 unit of the Israeli Defense Forces and applied in higher education institutions.

Roy Zur, CEO, Cybint Solutions

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

The presentation highlights the steps taken by M.S. Panwar Community and Technical College (India) to establish alliances and collaborations with four community colleges in Michigan and Texas, including signed memorandums of understandings for study abroad programs. The presenter discusses the outcome of the 2017 study abroad program when ten students and five faculty members from Montcalm Community College travelled to M.S. Panwar Community and Technical College.

Brijender Panwar, President, M.S. Panwar Community and Technical College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Have you ever wondered how to effectively address the learning needs of students who struggle with traditional learning approaches or experiences? Participants share their experiences with addressing the learning needs of students who have been unsuccessful or who struggle applying theoretical knowledge and skills. Leave this session with an increased understanding of successful remediation techniques.

Mary Jean Thompson, Faculty, Science and Health, Medicine Hat College; Susan Sexsmith, Faculty, Science and Health, Medicine Hat College; Una Weich, Faculty, Science and Health, Medicine Hat College; Tanis Robinson, Program Coordinator and Instructor, Nursing, Medicine Hat College; Sandy Fritz,  Instructor, Health and Science, Medicine Hat College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

All students decide how they will schedule their classes to complete their two-year credential. This presentation starts with an overview of a dissertation based on student scheduling choices and time to completion, as well as the average GPA for students completing a two-year credential at a two-year technical college. The session concludes with a discussion about various scheduling strategies that help ensure students complete their credential in a timely manner.

Mark Rzeznik, Associate Dean, Graphics, Engineering, and Diesel Technology, Waukesha County Technical College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

San Antonio College is in the early stages of using a student dashboard and portfolio system. Learn about the journey we are taking to build connections for students in the seemingly separate areas of student learning outcomes, marketable skills, and portfolios. This session includes a preview of the system, explanation of the pilot development, specific events held, lessons learned, and the rewards produced.

Jolinda Ramsey, Director and Faculty, Learning Assessment and Speech, San Antonio College; Julie Razuri, Coordinator and Faculty, Learning Assessment and ASL, San Antonio College; Dr. Franc Solis, Dean, Performance Excellence, San Antonio College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

Ever taught a class and it seems to have gone great, but when it’s time for Q&A or comments, there’s an awkward silence? You begin to feel like a dentist pulling teeth just to get a response. I wish I could say there’s an app for that, but I can’t. However, there is a brain strategy! This strategy simply requires you to change your “teacher talk.” The goal of this session is for you to learn how to use teach-talk strategies to create a learning environment that is interactive and thoughtful.

Sandra Ledesma, Assistant Professor, Education, South Texas College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 615B, 6th Floor

Participants experience a demonstration and interact with the 3-D Talking Tactile Map. The 3-D Talking Tactile Map incorporates universal design elements that make it a useful navigational learning tool for all students. Learn about the conceptual, design, and production phases of this unique faculty, staff, and student service-learning creation, as well as lessons learned and end-user feedback.

Shelia Spiegel, Accessibility Assistant, Disability Support Services, Wake Tech Community College; Mary Murr, Assistive Technology Technician, Disability Support Services, Wake Tech Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Let’s discuss new models for targeted review that help renew student motivation while accelerating a pathway to career goals. Personalized online review can help learners achieve core requirements in their chosen field of study. Co-requisite or supplemental instruction may also allow for remediation while students are enrolled in other courses. The presenter demonstrates open-educational resources from the non-profit NROC Project that are designed to support learner-centered instruction.

Angie Smajstrla, Manager, Regional Membership , The NROC Project

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Society today holds many stigmas toward a number of groups and issues. The study of stigmas seems to be intriguing for college-age students, as well as researchers. During this session, participants examine a cross-curricular approach to teaching about stigmas and statistics using a survey. Come see how this process encourages faculty to work together to introduce new techniques, use more technology, and bring new concepts together between courses.

Lisa Troy, Associate Professor, Mathematics, Warren County Community College; Jennifer Harrison, Assistant Professor, Social Science, Warren County Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

This session includes techniques and activities that help attendees better deal with students who may be reluctant to participate in group activities in the classroom. Attention is given to the variety of reasons that dissuade students from wanting to participate in group activities, including the many disabilities that students sometimes face and the fears that accompany those disabilities.

Steven Bale, Professor, Computer Technologies, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 404, 4th Floor

The session focuses on the planning, setup, and implementation of a completely online capstone information technology course that uses project groups and industry professionals. The session provides strategies and tools used to make the course as interactive and successful as possible while providing an in-depth experience with a comprehensive IT project in a group format.

Craig Tidwell, Professor/Program Manager, Information Technology, Seminole State College of Florida

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

This discussion focuses on a pedagogical approach to achieving better assessment outcomes and creating an all-inclusive safe zone where students are free to learn in classroom settings. Explored are teaching strategies and teaching methodologies specific to diverse student learning populations.

La Della Levy, Professor, Political Science, College of Southern Nevada

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

"We all are teachers, we all are learners." This session is titled after a book by Donald Finkel, "Teaching With Your Mouth Shut". The focus is on why teachers should talk less so students are more engaged and learn more. Participants experience the session as students and share feedback during and after the activities. Participants leave with at least five new engagement strategies they can immediately apply in their classrooms.

Ericka Landry, Faculty Director, Organizational Development, Lone Star College System; Cory Colby, Professor and Internship Coordinator, Government and Civic Engagement, Lone Star College–Tomball

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Come learn about various free tools you can use in your classes to increase student engagement. Tools covered include Screencast-O-Matic, Kahoot (Survey and Quiz), and PowToon.

Amy Quesenberry, Instructor, Physical Therapist Assistant, St. Philip's College; Irene Cook, Technical Trainer, Health Profession Opportunity Grants, Alamo Community College District

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 406, 4th Floor

Students learn best when the curriculum is presented in a manner that matches their learning styles; technology has given us this ability. The presenter shares apps and programs that use various learning styles as methods of instruction. This session allows you to reinvent your instructional methodologies. Doing so will allow you to raise your course’s rigor while increasing student engagement.

Lamar Collins, Assistant Principal, Administration, Temple High School

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 402, 4th Floor

In 2017, Senate Bill 11 (Campus Carry) took effect at two-year college campuses across Texas. At the heart of the debate over SB11 is one main question: Will this law make colleges safer or more dangerous? This timely presentation communicates research conducted at Lone Star College-Montgomery. The presenter discusses the divergent perspectives held by faculty, staff, and students and outlines policy considerations for institutions in states with similar pending legislation.

Dominic Beggan, Professor, Government, Lone Star College–Montgomery

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Room 404, 4th Floor

This session addresses the concept and research that support using High-Impact Practices (HIP) to assist students become successful learners. We start by discussing what HIPs are, followed by sharing research that supports these activities. We then discuss how HIPs help students and the college. We finish with a discussion about the HIPs adopted by our psychology department.

Charles Seltzer, Campus Coordinator, Psychology, Community College of Baltimore County; Jessica Carroll, Instructor, Psychology, Community College of Baltimore County

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Part-time faculty hold up half the academic sky, yet they lack access to professional development and informal support systems provided to full-time faculty. This session showcases the Guttman Seminar, a semester-long program that brought together 35-part-time faculty to explore classroom and institutional experiences, examine pedagogies and principles, and foster community through reflective practice. Join in a mock Guttman Seminar session and learn about the transportable elements of this model for supporting part-time faculty.

Nate Mickelson, Assistant Professor, English, Guttman Community College; Lydia Shestopalova, Adjunct Lecturer, Interdisciplinary Studies, Guttman Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Do you feel like Ethan Hunt from “Mission: Impossible” when working with the millennial generation? We had the unique opportunity to work with this dynamic group of students from college enrollment to employment, and it opened our eyes to a new wave of solutions and challenges. Are you ready to engage this group in your classroom, office, internships, clinicals, and workplaces? Join the conversation and be ready to share! This message will self-destruct in five seconds.

Julian Nixon, Professor, Biological Sciences, Greenville Technical College; Richard Dawkins, Director, Student Success/Call Me Mister, Greenville Technical College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

In 2017, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College implemented the Office Hour Initiative in the English and math divisions. By allowing faculty to provide flexible office hours, over 750 students met with faculty during the fall semester. These office hours built meaningful relationships and yielded critical conversations between students and instructors. Come and discuss see the results and find out how to implement something similar at your institution.

Jenny Billings, Chair, English, Developmental Reading and English, and Study Skills, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Melissa Reid, Chair, Mathematics, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Angelo Markantonakis, Associate Vice President, Academics, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 8:45 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Hope is the belief that tomorrow will be better than today and that you have the power to make it so. Research has concluded that increasing hope in students leads to a 12 percent gain in academic performance. During this session, participants explore how to help students develop the core competencies of hope, goals, agency, and pathways. Best practices for developing hope in others are shared.

Scott Geddis, Faculty, Health Professions and Wellness, Phoenix College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 417A, 4th Floor

The role of community colleges in regional economic development is rapidly expanding into new service areas, partnerships, and programs. This session presents examples of the entrepreneurial ecosystem work taking place in Tarrant County and provides a framework for similar activities at other community colleges. Participants are encouraged to engage and share their experiences and learn what is working in other ecosystems.

Michael Kaluya, Professor, Economics, Tarrant County College; Eli Mercer, Dean, Division of Health, Business and Technology, Tarrant County College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Through a participatory dialogue, participants develop an interactive lesson using storytelling techniques. Come explore how to use storytelling to reach learners of all ages and abilities using auditory, visual, kinesthetic, and emotional modalities. Following the session, participants are able to implement strategies that require little or no technology to reach students who may not be able to access the internet.

Loran McEvoy, Consultant, Center for Teacher Effectiveness

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Room 615A, 6th Floor

As the Boomer Generation moves into retirement, many institutions face the challenge of identifying new leaders. This session explores a rural community college that moved from a senior leadership team with many years of experience to a leadership team all under the age of 40. Discussed are the challenges the team faced, the successes they found, and how the transition changed the culture of the institution.

Jody Tomanek, Area Vice President, Academic Affairs , Mid-Plains Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 410, 4th Floor

Harford Community College implemented a “Tools for Success in Education” workshop to help students persist, complete the GED, and transition to postsecondary education and employment. Students learn how to set Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound goals. Students establish action plans and develop notetaking, study strategies, self-management, and self-efficacy skills. Students also build learning communities to help them balance the demands of being a student with the rest of their lives.

Rhonda Davis, Transition Specialist, Adult Developmental and Literacy Program, Harford Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 400, 4th Floor

Illinois' Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act includes transitional math courses, which are high school courses for seniors designed to smooth their transition to college. Upon successful completion, students earn guaranteed placement out of remediation at all Illinois community colleges and some Illinois universities. Come learn more about these courses, including their content and teaching approach, as well as their implementation, which is happening at scale throughout the state.

Kathleen Almy, Research Associate, Center for P20 Engagement, Northern Illinois University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 417B, 4th Floor

Participants engage in classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and generate ideas for additional CATs to employ at their own institutions. Many techniques can be used in place of the typical meeting structure we've all come to loathe in higher education.

Cynthia Cerrentano, Dean, Instruction, Metropolitan Community Colleges - KC

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 402, 4th Floor

Case studies can be a powerful tool for creating dialog and shared-learning experiences between faculty and administrators. This presentation helps institution-based change agents think about how to use case studies to support diversity-focused change interventions. Insights and examples are shared from a national workshop that took place in 2017. The workshop’s goal was to advance dialog about equity and inclusion in undergraduate STEM education.

Andrea Beach, Professor and Co-Director, Center for Research on Instructional Change in Postsecondary Education, Western Michigan University; Charles Henderson, Professor and Director, Mallinson Institute for Science Education, Western Michigan University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 412, 4th Floor

"Students don't care how much you know until they know how much you care." Discover secrets for tapping into your students’ motivation in the classroom. Learn how to use The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace in a classroom setting. Session participants leave with concrete strategies and techniques that use the languages of appreciation and motivational theory in and out of the classroom to enhance student engagement and success.

Jeff Johannigman, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Austin Community College; Chelsea Biggerstaff, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Room 408, 4th Floor

Exploring transfer opportunities can be an overwhelming process for community college students. With a holistic advising approach in mind, session participants discuss how to use various student development theories and advising trends to better prepare students to practice effective transfer strategies. Participants also review the factors students should take into consideration when deciding where to transfer and leave with a variety of resources that help students research their transfer options.

Nathan Martinez, Certified Advisor, Student Success, St. Philip's College; Yvonne Benton, Certified Advisor, Student Success, St. Philip's College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Room 412, 4th Floor

Traditional methods of teaching are mainly centered on the foundational underpinnings of pedagogical theory. Socratic teaching is the most powerful teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking when teaching adults; student engagement is paramount in andragogy. The focus of this session is on simple progressive methods used to teach adult students how to think instead of what to think, which increases students' ability to apply subject matter and enhances their overall learning experience.

Preston Rich, Associate Professor, Business, Collin College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 615B, 6th Floor

Using StrengthsFinder from Gallup, participants discuss how each individual can use their strengths to work successfully as a team in their department and in the classroom.

Suzanne Sandmann, Instructor/Instructional Designer, Cosmetology , Nicolet College; Penny Kuckkahn, Director, Instructional Effectiveness, Nicolet College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Room 415B, 4th Floor

Six faculty members teaching in diverse disciplines came together to study the impact of integrating purpose-based interventions into their courses. This cohort developed a purpose evaluation tool that was administered pre- and post-course. Learn about the collaborative process of designing assignments and about the results of our exploration into the relationship between purpose and student success. You’ll leave this session with a resource kit for implementing these ideas in your own courses.

Andrea Scherrer, Faculty, Counseling, Maricopa Community Colleges

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 414, 4th Floor

The presenters discuss methods for tracking students using a run-rate methodology, a successful process for increasing student interaction, communication, and engagement with the local community. Students incorporate technology and enhanced soft skills to meet the needs of local employers. Creating an online course format and successful internships are reviewed.

Angelo Markantonakis, Associate Vice President, Academics, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Debra Neesmith, Associate Vice President, Academic Support, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 10:00 AM, Room 414, 4th Floor

Join us for an engaging discussion about Competency-Based Education (CBE) program design that makes seeing alignment and gaps quick and easy. We’ll explore a new development model that replaces spreadsheets with interactive curriculum maps for insights into scaffolding and alignment across course, program, and institution levels. Come to the session ready to discuss CBE and leave with new ideas about how you approach planning your CBE programs.

Diane Weaver, Cofounder, Coursetune; Donna Kidwell, Adjunct Professor, Institution for Transformational Learning, University of Agder, Norway

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Room 616A, 6th Floor

Roundtable Discussions

What methods do colleges employ to ensure academic rigor and honesty in a classroom that only meets online? Our department has developed an honor code and integrity statement that students must read and agree to prior to submitting graded work. Sample honor statements are provided and participants are asked to share their policies. Discussions focus on creating an online environment rich in content, discussion boards, and a variety of assignments that promote learning and understanding.

Laura Buddin, Chair, Mathematics, Wayne Community College; Katina Davis, Professor, Mathematics, Wayne Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Before educators can effectively contend with students’ academic needs, we must address how we validate non-cognitive skills. This session is based on a training and reflection manual designed for faculty who teach developmental English students. We discuss a number of practical engagement attitudes, strategies, and reflections undergirded by practice, research, and theory. Participants consider the correlation and essential role of non-cognitive factors in the academic and cognitive growth of developmental English students.

Pamela Tolbert-Bynum Rivers, Associate Professor, English, Naugatuck Valley Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

A qualitative study considered the perceptions of successful former developmental Hispanic college students in a rural community college located in the Rio Grande Valley region who reached their goals despite considerable odds. This study investigated the factors that contributed to the successful completion of developmental Hispanic students in order to assist institutions of higher education be successful with similar populations.

Anna Alaniz, Coordinator, ASECND-Ascender, South Texas College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Participants learn which unconscious biases are most likely to impact students in a negative way. They are then guided through exercises that demonstrate how to recognize implicit biases in themselves and shown debiasing strategies they can use in the classroom. At the end of the session, participants are more aware of their own biases and how to overcome them.

Ann Su, Adjunct Faculty, Paralegal, Portland Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

In an age of an increasingly diverse student population, the face of the faculty must shift to more effectively connect and engage with diverse students. Doing this requires a shift in how diversity is evangelized and understood. Faculty must be recruited, hired, and retained to address the evolving diverse student demographic. This roundtable discussion is a platform to share ideas about how to attract, retain, and promote our best and brightest students and faculty.

Preston Rich, Associate Professor, Business, Collin College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Participants discuss what one Advanced Manufacturing Technology department and its partners are accomplishing in the areas of education and manufacturing training. The roundtable discussion facilitator shares the efforts, tactics, and approaches the department is taking to meet employers' demand in the region and across the border and to increase female presence in Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

Esmeralda Adame, Assistant Dean and Program Chair, Advanced Manufacturing Technology, South Texas College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

This session provides tools useful in identifying and integrating individuals from lower economic classes into the collegiate experience, not only to retain them, but also to help them complete.

Kamara Taylor, Assistant Professor, Psychology, Finlandia University

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Truckee Meadows Community College recognizes how art can bring people together; it can start a dialogue and create a sense of belonging. By combining community and collaborative art projects with learning, students connect to new ideas in creative ways. Come discuss a variety of community art projects in which faculty and students have participated. The focus is on the impact these opportunities have on our students and the communities they live in.

Candace Garlock, Galleries Curator/Instructor, Visual Art, Truckee Meadows Community College; Corina Weidinger, Instructor, Art History, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Exceptional results from Mott Community College’s 2017 TRIO Bridge Program's College Success Seminar are presented. Participants identify three barriers to student success, three stakeholders who can help eliminate these barriers, and three additional stakeholders who can facilitate student success.

Angela Reeves, Adjunct Faculty, Counseling and Student Development, Mott Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

An idiomatic comparison of apples and oranges reminds us that synchronicity in thought and effort is virtually impossible when one thing has nothing to do with the other. During this session, participants discuss the differences in words, their meaning across social context and circumstances, and how their use changes over time. Hopefully, something shared sparks a light-bulb-moment that reveals intercultural issues resulting from the fact that we're talking about two different things.

Melissa Gonzalez, Professor, Office Technology, Central Texas College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

This session is designed to get your creative side working on a rubric for your classes. Learn about the main types of rubrics and the pros and cons of using rubrics to create an atmosphere of inclusion. Design your own rubric, evaluate the rubrics designed by other participants, and explore the elements of rubric construction needed to create a transparent assessment tool.

Susan Cotellesse, Faculty Fellow, Northeast Lakeview College, Alamo Colleges District

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Full-time college students in Texas seeking certificate or degree can pay more than $1500 a year in textbook costs. For many students, especially those who face economic challenges, high textbook costs are barriers for college students to be successful in their classes, to complete their certificates or degrees, and, for many, to even have access to higher education. One way colleges are addressing this problem is to adopt and develop Open Educational Resources (OER).

Debra Acuff, Department Chair, Management & Professional Services, San Jacinto College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Community and technical colleges serve the most racially-diverse students in higher education, yet the majority of faculty and staff identify as White. We need to talk more about this imbalance. Come and discuss how Whiteness negatively impacts our colleges as we speak out loud about our responsibilities as White educators to disrupt racism. Share ideas for antiracism education, professional development that engages cognition, and negotiating resistance and apathy.

Jessica Supinski, Director, Student Engagement, Renton Technical College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Graduating teachers from Edward Waters College are hired into Title One Schools. Many of these new teachers have not experienced positive nutrition habits in their personal development and therefore carry misconceptions about healthy eating into their classrooms. The College's Department of Teacher Education and Urban Studies developed the Healthy Halloween Initiative. This intervention is to change preservice teachers’ beliefs about science through creative lesson planning using art and science objectives.

Josetta Arnold, Faculty, Teacher Education, Edward Waters College; Felicia Wider Lewis, Faculty, Mathematics and Science, Edward Waters College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

With the student experience and active learning at its core, Camosun College is constructing a new facility to bring together the School of Health and Human Service Programs. Participants discuss strategies to engage students in meaningful ways and how various IT, furniture, equipment, and building design elements enhance the student experience through active learning in and out of the classroom.

Carly Hall, Coordinator, Centre for Health and Wellness, Camosun College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

An Essay in Progress is the process of guiding students through constructing a draft document with one exercise building on another as you teach the various components of writing an essay. At the conclusion, students have written an essay, participated in a peer-editing session, turned in a final copy, and received feedback, essentially completing a dry run before major essays are due.

Erin Whitford, Assistant Professor/Co-Chair, English/General Studies, Howard College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Is our carefully crafted feedback being heard? Are students treating writing as a process instead of just a product? Are they testing new concepts and ideas? In the classroom, we can gauge student reactions, check concepts, and answer questions. The sticky note technique the presenter created attempts to bring that dialog to the writing process. This method not only offers insights into your students, but it also helps develop their reflective self-questioning skills.

Lauren Drew, Instructor/Coordinator, ESL, Hudson County Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Financial literacy has become a key part of student success for many higher education institutions in the United States. However, without a clear plan for implementation and student engagement, colleges may waste time and resources on ineffective financial education initiatives. During this roundtable discussion, we'll explore strategies and free resources that result in more effective financial literacy programs.

Amy Conrad, Program Director, CashCourse, National Endowment for Financial Education

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

In 2015, Frederick Community College launched the Campus Book Discussion Series to engage the campus in conversations about the social upheaval in response to Freddie Gray’s death. Through intentional cross-campus collaboration and a Bringing Theory to Practice Campus Dialogue Grant, the series has since transformed into diversity, equity, and inclusion programming that spans curriculum, professional development, and student engagement.

Kelly Trigger, Associate Vice President, Center for Teaching and Learning, Frederick Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

In community colleges, we often find students from various backgrounds and academic experiences who feel uneasy or shy about participating in group activities. However, today's classroom and out-of-class engagements often involve collaborative activities. These activities may present challenges to students who are uncomfortable participating in group settings. This roundtable discussion examines the factors that help foster positive academic self-esteem and participation in group activities.

Scott Powell, Associate Professor, Social Science, Ivy Tech Community College – Southwest and Wabash Valley; Terryn Batiste, Accreditation Coordinator, Curriculum and Compliance, Houston Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Based on her recent Fulbright experience in Senegal, West Africa and in a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative aimed towards infusing local Florida history and culture into the general education curriculum, the presenter shares her experiences integrating the subject matter into introductory sociology classes. Participants discuss ideas for globalizing and localizing materials for general education classes and learn tips for applying for Fulbright and other opportunities designed for two-year colleges.

Sonji Nicholas, Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences, South Florida State College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 415AB | Table 3, 4th Floor

Bring your device to try out GooseChase and BreakoutEdu. Participants experience digital BreakoutEdu and GooseChase games and learn how to use them to engage students in course content while incorporating critical-thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity skills. Please download the GooseChase app before the session.

Frances Karels, Part-Time Instructor, Biology, McLennan Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 415AB | Table 2, 4th Floor

Achieving success in the first year of college can seem difficult or impossible for many students. Their success is influenced by a number of factors, including school transitions, challenging courses, and a variety of other personal issues. Students who hold a growth mindset are more likely to overcome these factors and achieve academic and personal success. This session addresses the strategies and interventions that foster a growth mindset for first-year college students.

Von McGriff, Coordinator, Academic Affairs, Polk State College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

For faculty who have only ever taught at four-year institutions, making the transition to teaching at a community college can present some challenges. By the end of this roundtable discussion, participants are able to explain challenges faced by faculty new to teaching at a community college and identify strategies, information, and advice that help them meet those challenges.

Christopher Johnston, Associate Dean, Arts and Sciences, Grand Rapids Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Knowles' Theory regarding andragogy, developed by American educator Malcolm Knowles, asserts that adult learning can be distinguished from pedagogy based on several assumptions. Participants discuss strategies that help repair broken connections between teachers, students, and employers. These strategies also help improve student classroom testing, lab performances, confidence, and job readiness.

Kenneth Williams Sr., Assistant Professor and Lead Instructor, Technical and Carpentry, Delgado Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 8:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

In a few states, much hue and cry has been made concerning the common core. During this presentation, the presenter demystifies the assumptions and false assertions regarding the common core and addresses questions such as, "What is the common core?" Why is there such a brouhaha?" "Why are some states anathematic to its enactment?" Participants then discuss the history of common core, its implementation, and the dissentient views regarding its commission.

Desmond Sawyerr, Professor, English, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

During this roundtable discussion, participants explore how an Introduction to Psychology class provides an ideal platform for exploring, teaching, and assessing general education learning outcomes. Using the signature assignment model, participants discuss how this course can help students master general education skills early in their college careers. The work developed by participants during the session will be published in a follow-up e-book.

Mark Kavanaugh, Professor, Psychology, Kennebec Valley Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

The School of Education at Daytona State College attributes its collaborative relationships with local school districts as a strength in making the transition from high school to community college successful for students. This presentation highlights best practices of the annual “Bridge to College Cadre” by focusing on how to plan and transition a cadre of students from school districts to the college, including budgeting, personnel, the agenda, and participant engagement.

Amy Ringue, Academic Chair, Education, Daytona State College; Margie Hensler, Assistant Chair, Education, Daytona State College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

The Non-Astonishing Teaching Tips card deck was developed with input from faculty at all levels of experience. As the contributors, faculty find they have something to offer each other for the everyday challenges of keeping teaching fresh. Learn details about the project’s implementation and use by faculty and ideas for future versions. Participants brainstorm about their own best teaching practices and ideas for sharing them in a long-term and engaging manner.

Mara Fulmer, Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Mott Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Life is a collection of stories, and everyone has a unique story to tell. As adult learners, these experiences significantly shape the way we receive, interpret, and share information. When students integrate their experiences into the course materials, the learning becomes more personal and better retained. When students hear something from someone with a different background, they learn something they may not have garnered otherwise. Thus, learning is maximized.

Kasia Wereszczynska, Adjunct Faculty, Psychology, University of St. Francis and Oakton Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Participants discover six features of Leonardo da Vinci's creative genius that are applicable across the curriculum to stimulate the creativity underlying innovation. Curiosity, imagination, observation, association, attentiveness, and self-indulgence are defined, discussed, and demonstrated. Participants see and internalize da Vinci's "code" of creativity by considering how methods of thought that are six centuries old are as timeless as genius.

Katherine Watson, Professor, Distance Learning, Coastline Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 1:30 PM, Room 415AB | Table 1, 4th Floor

The facilitator and participants share unique ways their classes have “met” using phones, tablets, apps, laptops, sleepovers, late-night library study sessions, coffee shops, diners, and more! Also discussed are the unique mechanisms instructors use to facilitate a sense of community, particularly for groups that have challenges associated with distance and cultures.

Stuart Lenig, Coordinator and Professor, Humanities and Media Studies, Columbia State Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to maintain the rigor of the STEM math sequence while balancing lower college readiness standards with pressures to increase success rates. Participants discuss the model in place at Northwest Vista College and participate in a guided, interactive reflection aimed at producing tangible modifications for the STEM sequence at their institutions.

Amy Collins, Instructor, Mathematics, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Many theatre and music students want to be performers, but in addition to often needing remedial work, they also lack the planning and personal growth skills needed to transfer to a four-year institution or to start their own career. Many such students leave before their third semester. Participate in this session and become a budding Lady Gaga and Pitbull—no performance required—to experience performance career planning, goal setting, planning, and prioritizing.

Ellen Shanahan, Professor/Chair, Music, Berkshire Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 415AB | Table 2, 4th Floor

The role of the educator is not only to impart technical knowledge, but to cultivate critical soft skills essential in the workforce. Critical on-the-job skills in the areas of oral and written communication, working in teams, time management, and networking can be easily incorporated as part of normal coursework, as well as enhance student engagement. Examples of how these skills can be added as part of your classroom are presented.

Frankie Wood-Black, Director, Process Technology, Northern Oklahoma College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

How can professors, lecturers, researchers, and students foster respect for and implementation of international humanitarian law, the rules that ensure respect for life and human dignity in war? We present the American Red Cross’ approach to working with colleges and universities and the tools available to support those efforts. This session aims to encourage academic communities to work with the American Red Cross to teach, debate, and research the legal and humanitarian issues relating to armed conflict.

Andrew Hill, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, St. Philip's College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Fred Rogers, the world's most famous neighbor, had much to say about the power of relationships. Participants consider how one faculty member made her office a purposeful neighborhood destination. We define "community" and "neighborhood" and explore our own roles on campus given those definitions. Participants also examine the importance of faculty-student relationships, discuss the complexity of student engagement, evaluate potential resources, and create their own campus neighborhood outreach.

Tamara Reynolds, Instructor, Early Childhood Education, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 4:00 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

The goal of this presentation is to inform participants about project management strategies that can be incorporated into accreditation activities to provide guidance and support to ensure compliance and sustainability standards are achieved.

Terryn Batiste, Accreditation Coordinator, Curriculum and Compliance, Houston Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

The linguist concept of a "proposition" has been shown to be essential for comprehension. Currently, there is mixed evidence that propositional analysis is an effective strategy for improving reading comprehension. However, the presenter provides empirical evidence that suggests that developmental education students who are shown how to recognize propositions show a marked improvement in their reading comprehension and their basic sentence writing skills.

Robert Grande, Professor, Developmental Education, Blinn College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Learn about how institutions are innovatively using community partnerships to promote academic program completion and career readiness. During this session, participants explore various workforce and economic trends currently impacting community and technical colleges. Participants also engage in a discussion about initiatives and key partnerships their institutions are using to promote career preparedness, while also promoting academic program completion.

Mordecai Brownlee, Vice President, Student Success, St. Philip's College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Your face-to-face courses can benefit from the same use of technology as your online courses. This session explores how to fit all the puzzle pieces together for stellar online delivery in a manner that can be used in online and in-class learning environments. Video how-to, slide-show expertise, and faculty-student opportunities for interaction are all discussed.

Melanie Arpaio, Associate Professor, Psychology, Sussex County Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 415AB | Table 3, 4th Floor

Many students are first-generation college students who have not been exposed to the benefits of education, including how it can lead to enjoyable, meaningful careers. This session shares how New Mexico State University-Alamogordo developed a Wildlife and Fisheries course in which students experience service-learning projects and receive internships. Recommended methods to ensure that student-learning objectives are met through experiential learning are covered, as is the supporting research.

Jennifer Smith, Professor, Career and Technology, New Mexico State University-Alamogordo

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 415AB | Table 1, 4th Floor

Despite the great benefits of service learning for students, faculty, and communities, there are challenges to overcome in order to garner full institutional support and faculty buy in. During this roundtable discussion, individuals share their challenges and leave with new ideas about how to get the support they need from their respective institutions, including faculty.

Lillian Huerta, Director/Adjunct Associate Professor, Service Learning and Civic Engagement, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 11:15 AM, Room 415AB | Table 1, 4th Floor

Our center is recognized as a leader in serving the vulnerable and underserved across five campuses and two counties in East Central Florida. Participants discuss the center’s services and how it accomplished its goals using only grant and fundraised dollars. Participants also discuss features they would like to implement at their institutions and leave with the tools and strategies to do so.

Erin Leduc, Director, Center for Women and Men, Daytona State College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 9:45 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 3, 6th Floor

What do you know about dyslexia? Using a simulation, videos, and student testimonials, learn about teaching college students who have dyslexia and discuss current brain research, remediation and accommodations, and the law. Learn what you can do in your courses to help students with dyslexia. Every teacher has the opportunity to positively change the life of a student with dyslexia. Do you know that teacher? Are you that teacher?

Karen Maguire, Professor, Reading, Florida SouthWestern State College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Every institution accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools must submit a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) focused on addressing a key issue that impacts student learning. Hillsborough Community College's QEP identified low retention among first‐time‐in‐college (FTIC) students. The college developed a new first‐year course to remedy the problem of FTIC attrition. During this session, the presenters discuss successes, challenges, and lessons learned during the development of the Start2Finish initiative.

Stephen Lambert, QEP Director, Academic Affairs, Hillsborough Community College; Bridget Mullen, Instructor, Reading, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

The 2+2 pathway from community colleges to universities offers many advantages to students. However, it presents challenges as well, particularly for first-generation college students. This session shares findings and best practices learned from the STEER grant, an NSF-funded partnership between the University of South Florida and Hillsborough Community College. Topics include the role of peer advising, faculty mentoring, and interinstitutional curriculum alignment.

James Wysong, Dean, Mathematics and Sciences, Hillsborough Community College; Alberto Camacho, Assistant Dean, Mathematics and Sciences, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

The number of Full-Time, Non-Tenure-Track College and University Faculty (FTNTTF) has increased for the past 40 years. With no promise of contract renewals and a lack of opportunities for career advancement, these faculty might experience feelings of anxiety. This session focuses on the findings of a study of FTNTTF. Learn about navigational tools for FTNTTF that may better inform their career path and advancement options. Discuss and share your college’s initiatives for supporting FTNTTF.

Alvin Merritt Boyd III, Special Assistant, President for NTID Diversity and Inclusion, Rochester Institute of Technology

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

During this roundtable discussion, participants discuss initiatives that acknowledge and support the role of adjunct faculty in achieving the college’s educational mission. As part of the discussion, participants brainstorm ways their colleges can acknowledge the valuable contributions made by adjunct faculty, as well as how centers for teaching and learning can be used to develop and support such initiatives.

Barbara LeBranch, Director, Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, Seminole State College of Florida

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Addressing workforce needs begins with discovering what skills businesses are seeking in potential new hires. Truckee Meadows Community College, in partnership with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, was presented with the challenge of meeting Tesla’s and Panasonic’s need for approximately 4,000 individuals at the Tesla Gigafactory in one year. Using a self-paced, flexible, and customized training program, the college created a specific training regimen using insights provided by industry professionals.

Karin Hilgersom, President, President's Office, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Understanding and addressing shyness in the classroom are not often discussed. As educators, we aim to maximize the realized potential of every student. The goal of this session is to understand the challenges faced by shy students. Participants brainstorm and review strategies for addressing the physical, social-emotional, and cognitive features of shyness. This effort will strengthen responsiveness and improve equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Mushira Shamsi, Instructor, Education and Early Childhood, Wharton County Junior College

Takes place on May 27, 2018, 3:45 PM, Room 415AB | Table 2, 4th Floor

Do you know your students? Prepare yourself to be an effective teacher by understanding who your students are. Help your students decipher information using Bloom's taxonomy hierarchy of learning. Are you tired of push back from your students? Consider Vygotsky's scaffolding technique. Are your students failing tests? Focus on learning through assessment. After participating in this session, you’ll have a better understanding of how active engagement is the key to successful learning.

Lauraine Paul, Associate Professor, Psychology, Clarendon College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

The Ascend program, formerly known as Dream Catchers, is a curriculum specifically designed to help underserved students bridge the gap between developmental, integrated reading and writing courses and academic courses in a smooth, one-cohort transition. The Ascend program implements a non-traditional model where the students belong to a cohort, form a club, and participate in staple events such as college transfer tours and a family dinner reception.

Angelica Cerda, Instructor, Developmental English, South Texas College; Dr. Juan Ramirez, Assistant Chair, Education, South Texas College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

The number of college students who are non-traditional, first-generation, first-year students increases every year. These students have a family, a full-time job, and many other issues that can become obstacles in their college pathway. We must find the educational hashtag to provide the tools they need to persist and graduate. Come discuss how to connect and help students make college their hashtag.

Eileen Santiago, Professor, Teacher Education Program, Broward College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Families are a powerful source of inspiration and support for Latinas seeking STEM careers. Research on persistence in STEM has reached new heights. Yet, there is still much to learn. Using testimonials, this session shares stories of resilience and the pathways taken by Latinas who have persisted in their pursuit of STEM careers. The stories bring to light the impact of la familia (family) and familismo on students’ persistence at a predominantly White institution.

Carmen Mercedez, Director, Faculty Development, Alamo College District

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Truckee Meadows Community College increased graduation rates from single digits to 31 percent. The Success First Program, a strategy adopted by the Academic Faculty and Student Services, targets underrepresented, low-income, first-generation students. From summer programming to mentoring, Success First provides support and resources to guide students. Recently, the program piloted “Math Wizards,” a summer program that addresses the math remediation needs of academically underprepared students. Join us to learn how Success First programming can help your students.

Yuli Chavez Camarena, Program Director, Access, Outreach and Recruitment, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Work is work and play is play, or so our parents taught us. However, does that still hold true in an economy where creativity is the primary competitive driver? Combining over 12 years of experience in game design with current research in motivation, the presenter shares ways to improve your productivity, innovation, and fulfillment by turning your work into play.

Jeff Johannigman, Coordinator, Faculty Development, Austin Community College

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 9:15 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 2, 6th Floor

Though the phrase is used in a wide variety of contexts, there are two distinct types of authenticity. On one hand, it refers to realism; on the other hand, authenticity has another, more philosophical, use. The latter refers to an existential question. After introducing the two concepts of authenticity, participants engage in a think pair-share activity to generate best practices for authentic assessment.

Yoni Porat, Instructor, Academic Services, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 8:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 3, 6th Floor

During this presentation, participants help design an app using Microsoft Office 365’s PowerApps environment. Participants work together to decide an aesthetic approach to manipulating one of the included templates in order to offer online learning materials to students. Along the way they’ll learn efficient methods for creating apps without programming.

John Rice, Instructional Technologist, Academic Technology, Blinn College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 11:00 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #3 | Table 1, 6th Floor

The VOWEL project was a collaboration between math and ESL instructors when it was determined that English was one barrier causing students to be unsuccessful in college-level mathematics. During this session, participants receive copies of the materials provided to VOWEL Project students, experience the materials, and discuss the project.

Jonathan Oaks, Professor, Mathematics, Macomb Community College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 3, 6th Floor

Today’s emphasis is on student success. However, have you ever asked, “How do I achieve student success by covering the course material?” Have you noticed how your students struggle with test-taking strategies? Do your students lack study skills and generally have apathetic attitudes? Let's put our heads together and see what strategies we can easily implement to cover the course material and help our students be successful!

Lupita Narkevicius, Student Services Assistant/Adjunct Instructor, PACE Program, Pierce College

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 1, 6th Floor

Come engage in an S.W.O.T. analysis of why teachers quit. Are we part of the problem or part of the solution? Bring an open mind and an open heart as we try to help minorities become successful teachers and have a rewarding career for themselves and their students.

Edward Lamb, Dean, Business, Technology, and Education, University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana; Brian Pruegger, Program Director, Business, University of Charleston

Takes place on May 28, 2018, 2:45 PM, Roundtable Discussion Area #1 | Table 1, 6th Floor

There's a huge disconnect between writing instruction that happens in classrooms and the type of clear, succinct writing skills that employers look for in potential candidates. Gain a greater understanding of that disconnect and, using your existing curriculum, learn strategies to transform your writing instruction to ensure greater student success in the job market.

Lisa Luton, Teacher and Independent Consultant, Stewart County Board of Education

Takes place on May 29, 2018, 10:30 AM, Roundtable Discussion Area #2 | Table 2, 6th Floor