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NISOD’s International Conference on Teaching and Leadership Excellence is the definitive gathering of community and technical college educators passionate about teaching and learning. Over the years, NISOD’s annual conference has provided faculty, administrators, and staff with the resources, ideas, and solutions that drive excellence in all areas of community and technical college campuses. Come and be inspired by thought-provoking sessions and pre-conference seminars designed specifically for community and technical college educators committed to improving student achievement. With more than 300 sessions in a variety of focus areas and formats presented by your colleagues from across the nation and internationally, you’ll walk away with dozens of ideas you can implement immediately!

Sessions presented are subject to change.

NISOD is transitioning to a paperless conference program by our 2020 conference. For our 2019 conference, only session titles will be included in the conference program. Full conference session descriptions can be found in our app, which can be downloaded here. In addition, we will also upload a printable PDF to the conference’s website closer to the event dates that participants can download and print.


Keynote Speakers

Reflecting on history and our tendency to ignore it in our forward-looking work, EDUCAUSE President and CEO John O’Brien invites us to consider the “history of the future” of higher education technology. He explores engaging “paleofuture” artifacts—for example, 19th century predictions of what technology would be like in the year 2000—and argues that there is much to learn from these glimpses into the history of the future.

John O'Brien, President and CEO, EDUCAUSE

Takes place on Monday, 12 – 1:30 p.m., Austin Grand Ballroom, 6th Floor

21st Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills and motivation levels. During this session, chemistry professor, learning strategist, and author Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire explains why many students come to college woefully unprepared and have difficulty achieving student learning outcomes. She also discusses cognitive science research-based strategies that facilitate conceptual, transferable learning that can close the achievement gap plaguing many of our institutions.

Saundra Yancy Mcguire, Director Emerita, Center for Academic Success and Assistant Vice Chancellor and Professor (retired), Louisiana State University

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Download TSHTL and TYHTL Color Flyer

Takes place on Tuesday, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m., Austin Grand Ballroom, 6th Floor


Featured Session

Dr. John Roueche, former Director of The University of Texas’ Community College Leadership Program, discusses the continuing decline in state support for higher education, with particular attention paid to community and technical colleges. Dr. Roueche also shares successful endeavors for building partnerships, cooperatives, and collaborations with community entities that require continuous learning and presents new models of community services.

John Roueche, Sid W. Richardson Regents Chair Emeritus and Director, The University of Texas at Austin

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor


Administrator Series

As student success and completion efforts continue to serve as top priorities for community colleges, keeping access and equity central to our work is critical. This session explores how community college leaders are working toward balancing success, assess, and equity through integrated planning, policy, and practice. In addition, session presenters share models, practices, and resources that have increased student success outcomes, while promoting access and equity.

Mark Milliron, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning, Inc.; Gerardo de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Civitas Learning, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

Today’s ever-evolving learning modalities provide great opportunities to reach a growing population of students that expect us to keep up with their diverse learning needs. Session participants explore these great opportunities to serve students through multiple modalities and discuss the reality that we need to have a much better understanding about how we deliver learning, for whom, and to what end.

Mark Milliron, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning, Inc.; Gerardo de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Civitas Learning, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

There is a great deal of energy and urgency surrounding community college efforts to put in place or strengthen student-success pathways. Numerous national, state, and local initiatives focus on providing students with a clearer understanding of their purpose, as well as their academic and/or career roadmap. The presenters discuss guided pathways models, as well as precision student engagement. In addition, student success outcomes and student experiences are shared.

Mark Milliron, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning, Inc.; Gerardo de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Civitas Learning, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

As funding for community colleges at multiple levels continues to decline, creative and alternative funding needs are on the rise. To this end, community college leaders, now more than ever, must have stronger financial acumen, as well as effective fundraising and advancement understanding and skills. During this session, the presenters share successful models, practices, and experiences that support student success, access, and completion.

Mark Milliron, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning, Inc.; Gerardo de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Civitas Learning, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

The effectiveness of a community college's culture is often a direct reflection of how well its politics, policy, and change management are integrated within a regional education ecosystem that includes K-12, community colleges, universities, and workforce learning providers. The degree to which these critical and ever-changing dynamics work in support of each other is the difference between shared cultural and political understandings and alignments. The presenters explore and provide examples of strategies for "bringing it".

Mark Milliron, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer, Civitas Learning, Inc.; Gerardo de los Santos, Senior Fellow, Civitas Learning, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor


Special Sessions

This session focuses on mental health issues that affect students and learning, particularly the impact of trauma. Participants discuss the psychosocial barriers students are facing and how trauma left untreated can have a negative impact on students’ emotional and social development. Participants advance their knowledge of how trauma affects learning, how to work with trauma-impacted students, ways to eliminate barriers to mental health treatment access, and leave able to articulate protective factors.

Monica Burgos, Academic Coach, ACES, Montgomery College; Jeanette Rojas, Academic Coach, ACES, Montgomery College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 602, 6th Floor

Colleges rely on the resourcefulness and persistence of their people to have the greatest impact on those they serve. Both of these essential skills are just two of the many values that can be learned from some of our society’s most underappreciated individuals, the “unlikely entrepreneurs.” The mindset developed in the entrepreneurial process of solving problems for others has been proven to create multifaceted, positive impacts on individuals, schools, organizations, and communities. Identify and understand how an entrepreneurial mindset is a solution to developing the skills colleges demand of their faculty and better faculty engagement.

Gary Schoeniger, Founder and CEO, Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 602, 6th Floor

Many of the students who walk through the doors of community colleges have already been told they are not college material. Through intentional and deliberate actions, colleges can begin to move students from nonproductive mindsets to productive mindsets and change the way they feel about past failure. This can lead to more engaged students—and ultimately, more successful students. Join us for a look at the latest findings in a report released by the Center for Community College Student Engagement that focuses the academic mindset and learn how Ivy Tech Community College has redesigned the student experience to impact the student mindset.

Linda Garcia, Assistant Director, CCCSE, The University of Texas at Austin Todd Roswarski, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs, Ivy Tech Community College – Lafayette

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 602, 6th Floor

Prepare to laugh out loud as we look at real-life situations that cause you to reexamine your passion, commitment, and attitude toward teaching and inspire you to take your teaching and leading to a higher level. This is an entertaining, but challenging session, so get ready to be encouraged, energized, and recommitted to the opportunities before you every day.

Kevin Tutt, Partner, Tutt & Daggs, Creative Performance Improvement

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 602, 6th Floor

Colleges depend upon policies, initiatives, and programs to support student success and college completion. Perhaps the best resource a college has, however, it its faculty. Based upon a qualitative study of faculty identified as "highly effective human levers of retention," this presentation highlights the behaviors, beliefs, experiences, priorities, and strategies of faculty members whose students are consistently successful. Using this information, attendees can help teach, promote, and support these faculty "habits" on their own campuses.

Kimberly Russell, Professor and Chair, Professional Development Programming, West Kentucky Community and Technical College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 602, 6th Floor

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Breakout Sessions

Faculty development initiatives exist at various levels throughout higher education. Despite the proliferation of such initiatives, administrators struggle with how to best encourage, support, and engage faculty who are busy juggling teaching, scholarship, and service obligations. This presentation shares findings on the challenges associated with faculty development identified by instructional staff, along with proposed solutions for successful engagement with and implementation of faculty development programs.

Mike Gillespie, Associate Vice President, Saskatchewan Polytechnic; Desalyn De-Souza, Mentor, Associate Professor, Department Chair, SUNY Empire State College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

A college president and three vice presidents present an overview of the challenges and decision-making processes that allowed a college to stay in business and serve students after 80 percent of its facilities were destroyed. The audience is invited to share their experiences with pre-disaster planning and to question why specific decisions were made regarding instruction, student services, finances, MOUs, community partnerships, and accrediting agencies. Lessons learned from the event will be emphasized.

Katherine Persson, President, Lone Star College – Kingwood; David Baty, Vice President, Lone Star College – Kingwood; Regan Houang, Director, Lone Star College – Kingwood; Bridgett Johnson, Vice President, Lone Star College – Kingwood; Darrin Rankin, Vice President, Lone Star College – Kingwood

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

Disaster preparation should be a part of every college's continuing work. Participants learn multiple strategies to identify areas within their own institutions that may need some work in order to be prepared in the event of a disaster. Benefit from lessons learned by an instructional team that was determined to continue course offerings to over 12,000 students despite the loss of 104 of the campus' 113 classrooms.

Maribeth Stitt, Academic Dean, Lone Star College – Kingwood; David Baty, Vice President, Instruction, Lone Star College System; Oscar Ramos, Academic Dean, Lone Star College System; Kimberly Klepcyk, Dean, Academic Partnerships and Initiatives, Lone Star College System; James Stubbs, Academic Dean, Lone Star College System

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

This combined session presentation will feature a “lesson plan” featuring developmental English students “collaboratively” learning how to generate and compose a thesis statement, which is the foundation of an essay. Moreover, this session also features an innovative presentation entitled "Writing the World," which highlights the unique ability to write effectively across the academic disciplines, about diverse people, diverse places, and many other multifaceted settings and genres that captures the unique "essence" of the world.

Philip Jones, Assistant Professor, English, Texas Southern University; Karen Laing, Professor, English, College of Southern Nevada

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

The University of St. Francis (USF) was an early adopter of an online course sharing consortium and used the partnership to generate revenue and keep students on track for graduation. Learn about course sharing and revenue-generating opportunities through the Online College Consortium, how the partnership has benefited students, and how USF monitors academic quality in shared online programs.

Lirim Neziroski, Dean,Teaching and Learning Outcomes, University of St. Francis

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

This session shares insight into recent ACT innovation that focuses on enhancing postsecondary student success. ACT is partnering with colleges to assist with placement, retention, supplemental learning, and institutional effectiveness initiatives. Participate in this session and learn how many of these services can be easily put into practice.

Don Pitchford, Director, HED Partnerships, ACT, Inc.

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Learn about the implementation of decentralized and centralized advising establishing a student/advisor connection through an assigned case management approach. Discussion will also include timely proactive interventions, strengthened faculty collaborations, and increased student contract through mandatory workshops.

Marissa Moreno, Lead Counselor, Lee College; Sarah Tidwell, Counselor, Lee College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Outcomes assessment at any level is an often a dreaded, misunderstood, and misused process. In fact, research shows that it is a common issue at all levels of higher education across the globe. Learn how this presenter initiated and implemented an assessment-focused professional development program for her institution based on specific research studies, review her data from pre- and post-course assessment, and receive information about the overall impact of the Making Assessment Understood for Improvement (M.A.U.I.) program.

Amber Nelms, Director, Institutional Effectiveness, Northeast Mississippi Community College; Kelli Hefner, Vice President, Northeast Mississippi Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Discuss the meaning of classroom management, various strategies for specific student behaviors in the classroom, and how to collaborate and cooperate with campus Behavior Intervention Teams. Participants are encouraged to share their own experiences with classroom management.

Franklyn Taylor, Campus Vice President, Student Affairs, St. Louis Community College; Donivan Foster, Manager, Campus Life, St. Louis Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Higher numbers of students are arriving on college campuses with significant mental health challenges, especially community colleges that may have open enrollment policies and attract at-risk students. This session will include case studies, reflection, and discussion focused on intervention work with both troubled and troubling students and best practices gathered from research related to community college Behavior Intervention Teams (BITs) and their work with students who threaten self-harm.

Kate Kramer-Jefferson, Director, Services for Students with Disabilities, Frederick Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

While Guided Pathways help students navigate degree programs, community college students face added challenges for transfer into programs that have additional degree requirements and expectations. These knowledge and planning gaps can lead to transferable credits that are not degree applicable and extra time towards degree completion. Alamo Colleges District and Frederick Community College have built Guided Pathways models that specifically address the transfer problem, and help students build seamless degree plans across multiple institutions.

Brian Stipelman, Associate Vice President and Dean of Arts and Sciences, Frederick Community College; Joseph Duran, Curriculum Analyst, Alamo Colleges; Zak Cernoch , Interim Director, Curriculum Coordination and Transfer Articulation , Alamo Colleges

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

The use of group activities to increase learning cannot be overemphasized; however, group activities have shortcomings. The primary shortcoming is that group activities can cause lopsidedness in work assignment among group members. This session addresses this issue through the use of hybrid classroom assessments, a procedure that allows students to work together but keeps each accountable for individual submissions.

Abidemi Akinloye, Instructor, Business, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Explore a structure for transfer based on the model most often seen in career programs: student engagement through career-focused activities rather than major-specific curriculum. Starting with a summer program for teens that introduces forensics, math, physics, psychology, anthropology, and more in a fast-paced, hands-on crime scenario, Parkland College is continuing to develop experiential programs that make general education concepts accessible and appealing to young students not yet certain about their educational goals.

Nancy Sutton, Dean, Parkland College; Cynthia Smith, Program Manager, Parkland College; Christina Beatty, Associate Professor, Parkland College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

By leveraging our Achieving the Dream membership, Harford Community College is becoming more resilient as an institution. Learn how historically siloed work is being transformed via an intentional review process and how HCC uses critical dialogue to unpack success metrics and related practices. Bold reforms impacting developmental coursework and gateway course completion are also shared, as well as specific methods to build an infrastructure of self-reflection via data discovery and application.

Elizabeth Mosser, Associate Dean, Academic Operations, Harford Community College; Jennie Towner, Associate Vice President, Student Development, Harford Community College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 615A, 6th Floor

Since receiving a Department of Labor Apprenticeship Expansion Grant in November 2016, the Community College System of New Hampshire has worked effectively with postsecondary credit and non-credit programs to build quality apprenticeship programs in health care and advanced manufacturing. Come learn how to use apprenticeships to build powerful faculty partnerships, student enrollment, student retention, and business connections. Session participants leave with a clear understanding of how to build successful apprenticeship programs with postsecondary providers.

Emily Zeien, Apprenticeship, NH Grant Manager, Community College System of New Hampshire; Anne Banks, Workforce Development Administrator, Community College System of New Hampshire

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

As educators, we endeavor to bring real-world experiences into the classroom because introducing students to and immersing them in real-world contexts meets important objectives. Those objectives are experiential learning, integrating classroom-acquired skills and knowledge, providing a holistic approach to learning, and fostering the sense of fulfillment that comes from helping others improve quality of life. This presentation shares best practices for implementing applied education and creating real-world connections.

Fiaz Merani, Instructor, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology; Abidemi Akinloye, Instructor, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Rasmussen College academic deans present the educational and institutional benefits of Campus Connect, a synchronous multi-campus classroom mediated through teleconferencing software, as a means to prepare students to transition from residential to fully-online courses. The Campus Connect instructional design not only assists students in locating school resources and developing self-regulated learning skills, it also increases student success. Learn about the program and how first-year and academically-at-risk students retain and perform better in Campus Connect than in fully-online courses.

Robert Neuteboom, Academic Dean, Rasmussen College; Lynette Barcewicz, Academic Dean, Rasmussen College; Andrew LaMere, Academic Dean, Rasmussen College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 615B, 6th Floor

This presentation examines how beliefs, emotions, and behaviors integrate into the decision-making process. A continuation of the well-received 2017 "What’s Your Cauliflower?" presentation, this presentation examines ways educators can help students become more resilient as they search for their “Cauliflowers,” also known as career paths.

Maryann Kovalewski, Counselor and Professor, Luzerne County Community College; Stephen Housenick, Professor, Luzerne County Community COllege; Joseph Kovalewski, Jr., Teacher, Berwick Area School District

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

To CBE or not to CBE? There are many myths surrounding competency-based education (CBE), from the role of faculty, to student success, to the actual process of learning. During this session, the presenters separate fact from fiction about CBE and provide examples of highly successful postsecondary CBE programs.

Amardeep Kahlon, Director, Austin Community College; Ann Kennedy, Adjunct Professor, Austin Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Use of Cell phone in the traditional, face to face classrooms will be demonstrated. Cell phone can be used for taking attendances and to perform classroom assignments. The attendance record and classroom performance is synchronized with gradebook. Cell phone use is embedded in TOPHAT learning mangaement system. A description of TOPHAT management system will be described.

Sadhana Ray, Professor, Delgado Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Not every institution offers structured professional development, but that should not stop faculty from pursuing professional development opportunities! This session provides information and advice for establishing clear, demonstrable career goals; an overview of available professional development resources and sample documentation; and suggestions for program implementation to help instructors fulfill their professional goals. Expanding on a modified, formal professional development plan, the session provides participants with all the necessary components to create and execute an informal professional development model that allows maximization of teaching effectiveness.

Donnie Featherston, Professor, Butler Community College; Andy Jones, Professor, Butler Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

Participate in an academic master planning session as conducted by the CAO at South Mountain Community College. Led by specific objectives and guiding principles, his team facilitated ten sessions over one semester that engaged faculty, students, and the community in a dialogue to identify academic priorities to address and carry into the future. The audience participates using provided tablets and apps to collect and instantly distribute data to stakeholders.

Clyne Namuo, Vice President, Learning (Academic Affairs), South Mountain Community College; Kyle Mitchell, Senior Program Analyst, South Mountain Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

In 2016, the American Association of University Professors published “On Collegiality as a Criterion for Faculty Evaluation,” a piece that argued collegiality should not be used as a distinct category for the purposes of granting tenure and promotion. During this session, the arguments laid out in this short article are used as leaping off points to discuss and debate what, if any, role collegiality should play in the faculty evaluation process.

Christopher Johnston, Associate Dean, Grand Rapids Community College; Christina McElwee, Director, Grand Rapids Community College; Bill Faber, Professor, Grand Rapids Community College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 615B, 6th Floor

Recent trends indicate that critical thinking skills encourage a growth mindset and foster students’ gains in mathematics and the humanities. This presentation disseminates approaches that use critical thinking skills to assist learners in overcoming challenges to learning mathematics and poetry. Upon completion, participants are able to use critical thinking skills to measure students’ learning outcomes. Mathematics and poetry activities are presented to ensure a practical experience of engaged critical thinking skills during the session.

Hope Essien, Professor, Mathematics, Malcolm X College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

The Fulbright Program offers a powerful opportunity for U.S. institutions to internationalize their campuses. This session introduces ways that the Fulbright Program can support sending U.S. faculty abroad and hosting international faculty at community colleges in the U.S. Also provided is an overview of a variety of Fulbright programs and highlights of the diverse range of community colleges that have successfully leveraged Fulbright to achieve internationalization goals for their campuses.

Sarah Causer, Outreach Specialist, Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Explore what is meant by the term “quiz,” the essential purposes quizzes serve, and a few methods of quizzing that don’t necessarily need to be called a quiz. Technologies such as Kahoot, Plickers, and Poll Everywhere will be discussed, along with concrete examples of how and why such technology should be used in the classroom to specifically address Generation Z students.

Nathan Swink, Associate Professor, Butler Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Although Canvas is the learning management system used by many educators for course management, it offers so many other opportunities for meeting the needs of your institution. Learn how to use Canvas for professional development, departmental collaboration, academic advisement, student engagement, dual program communication, and much more! Increase your interactions, consistency of information delivery, student response, and communication increase with the many possibilities Canvas offers.

Stephanie Duguid, Dean, Academic Instruction, Copiah-Lincoln Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

A professional development program called Community of Online Teaching and Learning was created to enhance the quality of online and hybrid classes. The intensive program teaches faculty best practices for teaching online and supports the implementation of these best practices into current online and hybrid courses. Learn the history and development of the Community of Online Teaching and Learning program and how it uses a designated online session and cohort model to provide faculty support in teaching online and hybrid courses.

Monica Martinez, Director, FITW Weekend College, Lee College; Veronique Tran, Vice President of Instruction, Lee College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

Over the past several years, dual enrollment has advanced as a popular avenue for students who want to accelerate their learning. Over the last three years, Camden County has moved dual enrollment participation from approximately 100+ courses taken to 1,535 courses this year. Join a Camden County high school principal and learn strategies that help to build a strong partnership between local high schools and colleges or technical schools to increase participation on postsecondary campuses as well.

John Tucker, Principal, Camden County High School, Camden County Schools

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Why is it so difficult to create interactive online classes? How do we use innovative models to design online instruction to support their success? Inspired by these questions, this presentation will introduce The High Tech/High Touch teaching model that leverages text, webinars, and instructor videos to improve student engagement in online classes, and demonstrate how to use Nearpod to design online interactive activities that provides real-time assessment data and create strong learning communities.

Shuang Zhao, Associate Professor Speech, Lone Star College – Montgomery; Chris Roddenberry, Associate Professor, Psychology, Wake Tech Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

In this presentation we will discuss the importance of embedding faculty-mentored service learning into non-internship courses. This presentation helps faculty move instruction from the classroom to the community. Topics include: Agencies, Strategic Plans, Budgeting, Needs Assessments, and Grant Writing. A successful service learning project will be presented and discussed followed by a “hands-on” recreation of a typical project.

Kreg Mebust, Professor, Truckee Meadows Community College; Don Spears, Professor and Department Chair, Ivy Tech Community College – Valparaiso

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

What does creativity look like in your discipline? While innovation is crucial to the advancement of any discipline, it can often be difficult to explain to students how, exactly, to be creative. During this session, participants explore what it means to be creative and how to help students develop their creative confidence in your discipline. Specific strategies for scaffolding the creative process will be used and shared during the presentation.

Claire Yates, Faculty Developer and Instructional Designer, Valencia College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Gain perspective on career and technical education (CTE) and dual enrollment from the tale of two states (North and South Carolina), as well as insight into innovative practices for these instructors. Discussion centers on working with and accommodating nontraditional students.

Angelo Markantonakis, Associate Vice President, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Kelli Antonides, Director, Career and College Promise Programs, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; Daryle Adams, Director, Career and Technical Education, STEAM, and Title III, Kannapolis City Schools; Dahmon King, Program Coordinator, Industrial Maintenance Technology, York Technical College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Colleges are increasing attention paid to equity and cultural responsiveness in their core values, but are those values truly being enacted? During this session, participants learn how faculty and administrators are using a Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) framework to “calibrate” their college’s definition of CRT while simultaneously using data to assess the gaps between what faculty and staff “value” about culture and diversity and the “frequency” of those values being enacted.

Ignacio Lopez, President, Harold Washington College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Do you desire to connect with students beyond the course content? This session explores how culture should shape our teaching. Participants describe cultural competence, examine how culture impacts student retention, and identify strategies to empower faculty to connect to a multicultural populace. Session activities include a culturally responsive self-assessment, discussion of personal biases that block student learning, and case studies in small groups to identify strategies to make culturally appropriate connections with students.

Jeremiah Shipp, Adjunct Instructor, Guilford Technical Community College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Dante’s narrative poem, The Divine Comedy, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity share a common inspirational core, that is the octagonal mosaic ceiling of the Baptistry of Saint John in Florence, Italy. Gazing upward, observing the angelic images surrounded by and surrounding the universe, both Einstein and Dante realized the same beauty in two different but unified worlds: the arts and the sciences. Over time, however, this union has dissolved into the arts “or” the sciences. Join us at a seat in Café Paradiso where Dante and Einstein meet for the first time, and participate in the conversation that renews the vows between beauty, art, poetry, science, and mathematics.

Anthony Pitucco, Faculty Department Chair (Retired), Pima Community College; Stewart Barr, Faculty Department Chair (Retired), Pima Community College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

The presenters debunk the top ten myths of competency-based education (CBE) and provide insights into how to leapfrog ahead.

Amy Stevens, Vice President, Southern New Hampshire University

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Minority and nontraditional students are participating in higher education in historic numbers; however, success rates for each group remain low. Participants explore and discuss factors related to attrition using evidence-based research. Participants also learn how to identify and support nontraditional students’ unique issues and needs to create an environment that fosters success.

Tahesha Wade, Department Chair, Southern Crescent Technical College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Design Center Studio offers students the opportunity for real-world experiences under controlled conditions while undertaking their regular coursework in Graphic Design. While similar to an internship, students work with potential clients to meet their visual communication needs in a college-based design studio. We will look at this model, how to implement it into your own program and how it can lead to improved student success.

Jim Shurter, Associate Professor and Art and Design Program Coordinator, Mott Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Policy changes are placing new demands on college mathematics departments. Learn how faculty have met the demands by collaboratively developing corequisite, online, and accelerated versions of Carnegie's Statway and Quantway pathways. Review the Carnegie Math Pathways design model, examine new pilot results and lessons learned, and leave with course redesign and implementation strategies.

Yolanda Manzano, Professor, Richland College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

The faculty-led Campuswide Learning Community (CLC) on Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology’s campus establishes a forum where faculty can share strategies and best practices, ask questions about challenges, and learn from each other’s experience. Learn details about the CLC and how to locate your campus’ subject matter experts and engage them in facilitating discussions about personal best practices. Participants discuss why the CLC is a valuable tool for faculty development, how to implement this type of program, and possible topics for forums.

Tara Cole, Instructor, Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology; Terry Hanzel, Instructor, Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

Being trapped in generational poverty with a lack of ancestors possessing and transmitting the intellectual, social, or financial resources needed for success can sometimes kill a college dream before it materializes. For students who are able to push beyond these limitations, the academic and economic journey from disadvantage to significance is still treacherous. Are your students prepared? The creator of The Journey workshop shares how to engage and empower underprepared students with techniques that help them break free of negative attitudes and entanglements and promote long-term success.

Steven LeMons, Director and Coordinator, Writing and Learning Center, Tarrant County College District

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

Learn about the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, a great source of community college funding and free STEM classroom resources, from ATE Central staff! For 26 years the ATE program has promoted community college innovation and workforce development while helping to support and build partnerships between academic institutions and employers. Attend this session to discover how to apply for ATE funding and mine the program’s valuable resources.

Rachael Bower, Director

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 616A, 6th Floor

After five decades of research and calls for supporting diversity in nursing, there still remains a lack of students of color in nursing schools. This presentation explores the continued lack of diversity in the workforce and presents strategies that can be used by nursing educators to support underrepresented students in nursing education programs.

Rebecca Harris-Smith, Dean, Nursing and Allied Health, South Louisiana Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

The Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative at Ivy Tech Community College started with the purpose of reducing the cost of course materials for students. In one semester alone, students saved over 1 million dollars. But, can OER do more than save students money? Can OER impact student completion rates? During this session, the presenters share Ivy Tech’s journey with OER and walk participants through a suggested process for developing an OER initiative on their campuses.

James Boldman, Associate Professor, Communications, Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus; Roshun Radford, Associate Professor, Communications, Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 616A, 6th Floor

Do you ever feel like you are herding cats when trying to maintain an orderly, respectful, inclusive, and motivating learning environment in the classroom? This presentation shares research-supported, time-tested principles for managing your classroom setting. “Walk the talk” as you explore ways you can foster and sustain a lively, engaged, orderly, empowering, and compelling learning environment. The goal of this session is to have fun while we help each other!

David Katz III, Executive Director, Organizational Development, Mohawk Valley Community College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

This high-energy, hands-on session focuses on strategies and tips for increasing online student engagement by integrating proven face-to-face classroom writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading (WICOR) learning strategies. Purposely infusing courses with WICOR strategies enhances the rigor of the learning experience, increases the level of student engagement, and captivates students, all of which help students persist in your classroom. Interface with other participants to share inspirations, ideas, and concerns and leave with a variety of references and resources related to WICOR to review and use in your classroom.

Erik Christensen, Dean, Applied Sciences and Technologies, South Florida State College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Most college students are required to enroll in a basic English class as part of their core curriculum. This general education English course is often considered a generic, “have-to-take” course that often does not meet the needs of or inspire nursing students. Learn about a creative collaboration between one college’s Nursing and English departments designed to introduce nursing students to field-specific writing and obtain basic elements of general writing processes at once.

Patricia Schwartz, Clinical Professor, Lone Star College – Montgomery; Ron Heckelman, Professor, Lone Star College – Montgomery

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

Despite national prominence, Guided Pathways can still prompt faculty to ask, “What is this and how will it enhance my classroom practice?”. This session offers a review of Guided Pathways paradigms that can best inform teaching and learning, and provides concrete strategies for pedagogical enrichment. Participants are led through revising one of their existing classroom assignments or practices using key Guided Pathways principles, including clarity, intentionality, equity, and connection.

Nicole Matos, Lead Faculty Facilitator, COD Pathways Project and Chair, Developmental English, College of DuPage

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

Prince George's Community College, now in its third year of the AACC Pathways Project, fully implemented Pathways during the Fall 2018 semester. Presenters discuss how the faculty-led program enabled the college to develop academic and career pathways and map each credit program to provide students with clear paths to graduation. Participants learn about activities, practices, and challenges surrounding the planning and implementation of guided pathways.

Laura Ellsworth, Associate Dean, Prince George's Community College; Mirian Torain, Associate Dean, Prince George's Community College; Korey Brown, Department Chair, Prince George's Community College; Aundrea Wheeler, Assistant Vice President, Prince George's Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

In 2016, Calhoun Community College created a three-year faculty onboarding program. Come learn more about the program, the rationale behind it, and the framework used to support new faculty. Hear our successes and lessons learned and generate ideas for starting your own program or how to improve an existing one.

Jennie Walts, Director, Faculty Development, Calhoun Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

As instructors who have navigated our way through college, we feel uniquely qualified to speak about the lives of our students. However, after reviewing collected data from our Faculty Student Mentor Program, we discovered that the things we initially thought would be important to students weren’t at all the case. Come discuss the importance of putting personal agendas aside to create a deeper connection and stronger relationships with students.

Esther Pais, Speech Faculty and Faculty Student Mentor Program Coordinator, San Antonio College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Explore the boundaries between the pain and pleasure of presentation delivery during this playful spin on effective presentations. Surrender to your desire for exciting presentations by learning about common delivery pitfalls and how to spice up any presentation from the cover designer of the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy.

Jennifer McGuire, Distance Education Instructional Applications Integration Specialist, Mountain View College; Rebecca McDowell, Director of Professional Development, Mountain View College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

This presentation provides an overview of the Cleveland Humanities Collaborative (CHC), a humanities-transfer partnership between Cuyahoga Community College and Case Western Reserve University. Leave this presentation with a blueprint for cultivating relationships between two- and four-year partner institutions, along with best practices for encouraging faculty engagement and fostering student success. The session closes with case studies based on current CHC students.

Abigail Dohanos, Associate Dean, Cuyahoga Community College; Melissa Swafford, Manager, Cuyahoga Community College; Allison Morgan, Program Manager, Case Western Reserve University

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

This session involves participants in fun, easy, hands-on activities that will keep you focused and provide classroom-tested examples of ways to keep your students focused in your own classes. Activities lend well to music appreciation classes, but can be adapted for use in any discipline. Use them to make your classes more engaging, enjoyable, and effective.

Allen Webber, Professor, Palm Beach State College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

This session includes discussion of the various ways to get published online. Learn ways to implement writing and online publishing in the classroom to improve students’ writing confidence and foster creativity. The presenter also shares her experiences with blogging, website creation, videos via PowerPoint, and Amazon publishing.

Angela Payne, Professor, Collin College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Engaging college stakeholders in planning can be challenging. Learn how one college launched an annual planning and review process that includes faculty, staff, and administrators. The planning framework engages stakeholders from across academic and student services areas and resulted in a systematic process that informs decision-making and budgeting. Attendees learn how the college approached the idea of planning, introduced the framework and process to stakeholders, and used a survey platform for its template.

Anne Zalewski, Director, Strategic Initiatives, Malcolm X College; Lisa Willis, Associate Dean, Student Development and Title IX Campus Coordinator, Malcolm X College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

What if 80 to 90 percent program completion was not a fantasy? What if you, with a little help, could create a way to change student lives (and yours) in the process? One faculty member did, and the results of the program have been remarkable. During this session, learn how to start a similar pathway and begin gathering a team of faculty that can change how you and your students “do college” and life.

Scott O'Daniel, Program Chair and Associate Professor, Communication; Coordinator of ASAP, Ivy Tech Community College – Lafayette

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

This presentation outlines the history of a mobile learning initiative within one degree program at Kennebec Valley Community College. The initiative started in 2015 in response to increased evidence of mobile device use in the workplace. Despite administrative approval, the initiative experienced internal and external barriers for implementation and evaluation of the program. Strategies for overcoming these barriers are discussed along with the presentation of the outcomes that were identified.

Wendy St. Pierre, Assistant Professor, University of Maine at Augusta; Mark Kavanaugh, Chair, Social Sciences, Kennebec Valley Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Learners’ success in mathematics courses is essential for obtaining a community college credential. Fortunately, there are promising initiatives underway to support learners’ success. Leveraging existing research also holds promise for bridging our commitments to access and inclusivity and improving student success and completion rates. Come learn about the latest research on improving inclusivity and closing the opportunity gap in mathematics, as well as how to increase program completion.

Rachel Bates, Associate Vice Chancellor for Educational Partnerships, Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

So many apps to choose from, but which ones work best? Which ones are free? How can they be used inside and outside of the classroom? Participants learn the potential that mobile and web applications offer to daily practice in and out of the classroom, gain new teaching skills using media, and explore ways that media can help learners develop communication and self-expression.

Chelsea Biggerstaff, Faculty Development Coordinator, Austin Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Recent surveys revealed that students of color sometimes feel overwhelmed, hopeless, and academically and emotionally unprepared. Some feel like a fly in a bowl of milk. Unfortunately, students of color don’t seek help in the same numbers as their white counterparts. Though educators are often untrained to deal with issues related to students’ culture, ethnicity, or race, the grief and mental health crisis of students can’t be overlooked. Come and learn non-therapeutic tools and strategies that help isolated students’ mental wellbeing.

Susan Toler Carr, Director, College and Career Counseling, Justin Carr Wants World Peace Foundation

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Come learn about initiatives designed to expand and strengthen the preparation of current and future STEM faculty in diverse settings. Participants interact with key components of field experiences such as recruitment and application processes; mentor and mentee responsibilities; pedagogical considerations including planning, assessment, and classroom management; and inclusive teaching strategies. Through this interactive, technology-enhanced presentation, participants acquire practical tools for initiating and enhancing faculty internships at their own institutions.

Gabriela Olivares, Associate Dean, University of Northern Iowa; Sacha Moore, District Coordinator of Equity, Inclusion, and Compliance, Golden West College; Craig Ogilvie, Assistant Dean, Iowa State University

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

What is failure? Why do students fail? How can we help students overcome failure? Participants identify and discuss strategies to help students reframe their failures and continue on to achieve success.

Barbara LeBranch, Director, Seminole State College of Florida

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Because people make programs, for every faculty vacancy there must be a great hire. How does an institution attract and employ individuals who will invest in those they are charged to teach and lead? Is there a formula for successful hires and hiring? If so, what are the factors? Participants are encouraged to discuss Robert K. Greenleaf’s tenets of Servant Leadership and how they apply to the hiring process.

Deborah Frazier, Chancellor, University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville; Jennifer Methvin, Chancellor, Arkansas State University – Beebe

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

In an effort to enhance student learning in a content area, we embedded a required, for-credit college readiness course within a required, for-credit, first-semester majors course. We show how to design a collaborative learning experience that incorporates learning objectives from seemingly disparate courses. Additionally, we help participants develop strategies for multidisciplinary linked courses, with an emphasis on how to integrate learning theory to improve student success in the primary content area.

Laura Wright, Assistant Professor, McLennan Community College; April Andreas, Professor, McLennan Community College; Michelle Powell, Associate Professor, McLennan Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

In this session, hear about the presenter's experience with actualized forms of active learning strategies. Participants leave the workshop with an understanding of such strategies including, “Pause Procedure,” “Think-Pair-Share,” and “Jigsaw” approaches to team activities. Learn about empirical research relating to the epistemology of such practices and watch demonstration of how these methods foreground crucial metacognitive capacities, including students' responses to challenge, understanding of course relevance, and awareness of personal aptitudes.

Cory Teubner, Associate Professor, English and Chair, Leadership Studies, Butler Community College; Mary Clapp, Professor, Information Technology, New England Institute of Technology

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

This session provides techniques on how to identify students that are who are involved in anti-social behavior and at risk of committing crimes and how to find ways to create programs within the school environment to re-engage this unique and ever-increasing population of students. Learn how students, parents, administrators, teachers, principals, and staff canconnect with and inspire each other, build relationships to ensure that all faculty is protected, and participate in fostering a positive school environment that ultimately makes everyone safe.

Victor Woods, CEO, Success International Incorporated

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Students often struggle in online discussion and feedback forums. Even those who write meaningful and accurate responses to a discussion question find it difficult to leave substantive feedback for their peers. To alleviate these problems and boost performance, learn how to rewrite discussion prompts with a humorous edge and create guided peer replies.

Lea Rosenberry, IT Training Specialist, Penn State University; Tami Tacker, Professor, Purdue University Global

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 615A, 6th Floor

Join us as we share practical and meaningful strategies that can be used to evaluate and develop large constituencies in a college setting. A case study of how these strategies were used to impact more than 1,300 adjunct faculty is shared. Participants also reflect on learner-centered techniques that positively impact student engagement at their institution and consider how presented strategies can be applied in a variety of organizational structures.

Sonia Watson, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage; Kate Szetela, Manager, Adjunct Faculty Support, College of DuPage

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Participants gain knowledge about scholarly research on diversity, equity, inclusion, and culturally responsible teaching. Initial research outcomes of a training program focused on increasing nontraditional student success are presented. The workshop includes a training exercise to engage the audience and a discussion about how to implement these concepts in academic divisions and into the college environment as a whole.

Denise Barton, Senior Professor, Business Administration and EPIC Mentoring Coordinator, Wake Tech Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

Wouldn’t we all love to roll out changes according to established best practices and reliable data? This session includes a case study on change management at a large, urban community college, as well as a discussion about the strategies and best practices used to help academic leaders implement the Guided Pathways Model.

Russell Frohardt, Dean, Academic Success, Northwest Vista College; Janie Scott, Project Facilitator, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Research shows high percentages of adjunct faculty do not believe they receive the same appreciation from institutional leaders as their full-time colleagues. Come discuss innovative ways to raise the appreciation level of adjunct and part-time faculty and receive activities, strategies, and secrets to use for promoting appreciation.

Lilisa Williams, Director, Faculty and Staff Development, Hudson County Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

This session explains the purpose of training and equipping First-Year Seminar instructors to support student success. The presenters share how they implemented a training institute for faculty, what happens at the training, and how a common course shell for all instructors not only promotes consistency in content, but provides faculty with a foundation to be successful. Participants receive implementation steps, policies, and a blueprint for success to take back to their institutions.

Von McGriff, Department Chair, Polk State College; Cody Moyer, Instructional Technologist, Polk State College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

The topic of adjunct faculty satisfaction and effectiveness is an important area of concern for higher education institutions nationwide, and particularly for community colleges, as they are particularly dependent on adjunct faculty to deliver academic content. This presentation will focus on ways that colleges can increase the teaching effectiveness and satisfaction of adjunct faculty through provision of specific institutional supports and resources.

Melodie Hunnicutt, Adjunct Faculty, Midlands Technical College; Anna Conway, Director, Teaching and Learning, Des Moines Area Community Colleges

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

College is an expensive endeavor for most students and, with the cost of textbooks steadily increasing, many students (especially the economically-challenged) find college out of reach. This presentation focuses on using Open Education Resources to promote equity in STEM and technology courses by reducing costs for learning materials. Participants are given a list of discipline-specific tools and resources that can help to reduce the costs of instruction while increasing access to affordable learning opportunities.

Esperanza Zenon, Associate Professor, River Parishes Community College; Auriel McGalliard, Instructor, River Parishes Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Learn how to engage your students with classroom activities that illustrate economic concepts such as supply and demand, shortages and surpluses, international trade, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Alexandra Shiu, Professor, McLennan Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

Often, we feel that if we require students to use scholarly sources instead of Google we’ve helped them become more information literate. Our insistence on scholarly publications, however, may be perpetuating systems of privilege while excluding marginalized persons who could very valuably contribute to the conversation. During this session, participants examine problems inherent in scholarly publishing and look at assignments that can deepen students’ use and understanding of various types of sources.

Linda Reeves, Librarian and Faculty Trainer, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

How to design Collaborative Online International Learning modules around high impact practices using new technologies like streaming video, social media and chat applications, and making compelling content. This presentation is suitable to faculty from all disciplines and will include an overview of the following tools: PechaKucha, Kahoot, Mentimeter, Facebook, ZOOM, and WhatsApp, among others. Using case-studies, participants will discover how students develop team-based problem solving skills focused on business communication and entrepreneurship.

Majd Sarah, ESL Faculty, El Paso Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

Learn how the Mississippi Community College Board (MCCB) works with new Career and Technical Education (CTE) faculty members through our Institute for Teaching and Learning. We offer an innovative professional training system that focuses on providing CTE faculty the tools and techniques necessary to facilitate student-centered learning. The presenters share how the MCCB approaches the nine-month training program, as well as best practices and considerations for implementing similar faculty development.

Krystal Thurman, Assistant Director, Training and Professional Development, Mississippi Community College Board; Falana McDaniel, Training and Professional Development Specialist, Mississippi Community College Board

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

During this session, participants learn how to address the potential fears and anxieties of foreign students who are considering studying in the U.S., how colleges can market different approaches to helping students navigate the application and F-1 Visa process, gain understanding the role and impact of lobbying, and how to go about working with legislators and the U.S. State Department. Further, participants learn the importance of and how to address post-graduation residency and workforce integration concerns.

Timmy Westley, Instructor, University of Phoenix

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Opportunities abound when it comes to broadening horizons for community college students. This session provides an overview of Arkansas State University Beebe (ASU-Beebe) faculty-led field trips to Dallas and El Salvador, and ongoing projects in world civilization and comparative religion courses. The presenters also share how ASU-Beebe is exploring and experiencing communication at a global level through the use of Zoom videos and student presenters reflect on their experiences.

Eddie Supratman, Assistant Professor, History and Religion, Arkansas State University-Beebe; Emily Dobbs, Student, Arkansas State University-Beebe; Krista Holland, Student, Arkansas State University-Beebe; Jeremy Backus, Student, Arkansas State University-Beebe

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Transform the learning environment with a faculty-driven, holistic approach that uses a simple process proven to close student achievement gaps in developmental and academic first-term top enrollment courses. This process has resulted in multiple national awards for two colleges, both of which contain a large portion of underserved students. Participants will leave with a plan of action for incorporating basic strategies guaranteed to improve student learning and retention into courses.

Tony Holland, Special Assistant to Chancellor – Teaching and Learning, Alabama Community College System

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

This session highlights a community college intervention method linking real-world jobs with career pathways students choose based on their interests and what they think they like at the time. You will be asked to participate via your smart phone to see if you are indeed following your passion.

Sandra Gonzalez-Lamb, Senior Advisor, St. Philip's College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

Looking for apps to engage students in a modern classroom? This session is for you! Join the presenter as he shares 60 tools in 60 minutes that help incorporate technology into your workflow.

Robert McWilliams, Coordinator, Instructional Design, Bishop State Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

This open-discussion breakout session will explore the effectiveness of utilizing "Meaningful Recognition" in our classroom/clinical setting. By incorporating feedback in the form of "I Like The Way You Said That/I Like The Way You Did That", students receive immediate positive affirmation, resulting in a boost in confidence and increased comfort level facilitating learning. The learner will: 1) Identify student situations where "I Like the Way You Said/Did That" could be utilized.

Wendy Garretson, Professor, Delgado Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

NADE, the largest professional organization in the field of developmental education, was established for those seeking ways to expand professional knowledge and expertise. NADE is an organization able to provide current, ongoing support that is reflective of students’ academic and developmental needs. Just as developmental education has undergone changes to meet student needs, so too must NADE adapt. Come learn about our name change and where we are headed.

Denise Lujan, President, National Association for Developmental Education

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 615B, 6th Floor

Financial literacy is often gained from our mistakes in life. Early life decisions financially impact students of all ages long after the initial behavior—student debt and credit are among these life-impacting decisions. How can we increase financial literacy and improve the most lives? By offering courses in formats that are best for students’ personal circumstances! This session explores tools, differences, and results from one financial literacy course offered in seven different formats from traditional face-to-face to online meetings.

Larry Buland, Program Director, Finance and Faculty, Metropolitan Community College; Steve NicholsInstructor, Metropolitan Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 616A, 6th Floor

Experienced teachers have had years to attend workshops and training, but new Ph.D. and master’s graduates may not be aware of how to navigate the system or innovations in teaching. Together we can help potential adjunct faculty obtain tenure. Come and learn skills for hiring, mentoring, and retaining excellent faculty, resources for new faculty, and tips for how to get that tenure-track position.

Kathy Carrigan, Instructor, Chemistry, Portland Community College; Jean Maines, Professor, Biology, Tarrant County College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Through funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Lone Star College – North Harris is empowering Hispanic students to connect to the campus community, acclimate to the rigors of academic life, succeed and self-improve for the duration of college, and achieve and compete in college and beyond. This presentation guides participants through a best-fit instructional initiative that’s having a positive impact on improving academic preparedness and engagement of Hispanic and underserved students.

Anne Albarelli, Dean, Lone Star College – North Harris; Bruce Martin, Professor, Lone Star College – North Harris

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

The primary goal of a college is to ensure that students succeed in the classroom and complete a degree to become successful in the workplace. However, in addition to information learned from textbooks and lectures, today students must be equipped with “soft skills” to thrive. These skills include a strong work ethic, appropriate and positive attitudes and behaviors, good verbal and nonverbal communication skills, plus more. During this presentation, learn the importance of teaching these skills to students and how to teach them.

Tamara St. Marthe, Faculty, Speech Communication, National Park College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

“Multiperspectivity” realizes that modern challenges are multifarious, complex, whole society-based, and global. They are most successfully met, addressed, and resolved by promoting a “culturally responsive learning space” that engages learners and teachers in critical, interactive “multilogue.” Globally-sourced examples are discussed, and a 3-2-1 process is deployed to show how multiperspectivity has been integrated across the curricula and can engage students productively while encouraging them to think more broadly and deeply.

Katherine Watson, Professor, Coastline Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

A number of studies indicate that test-taking anxiety negatively impacts student performance and may also lead to poor understanding of studied material, poor study habits, and poor attendance. Music therapy is one of many therapeutic modalities that demonstrates some usefulness for helping students manage test-taking anxiety and improving academic performance. During this presentation, learn how music can be incorporated into courses to reduce testing anxiety, promote relaxation, elevate mood, and improve student performance.

James McCaughern-Carucci, Professor, St. Johns River State College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Discover less-familiar, inexpensive technologies to create interactive and action-oriented activities and presentations for students in distance courses.

Kathrynn Hollis-Buchanan, Associate Professor, Kodiak College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

This discussion centers on faculty experience of developing and implementing a competency-based curriculum at Nicolet Area Technical College. The presenters shine a spotlight on their successes, failures, lessons learned, and the obstacles they’ve yet to overcome with regard to the program. They also offer a perspective of what competency-based education means for Nicolet’s student population.

Ed O'Casey, Instructor, English, Nicolet College; Regis Brost, Instructor, Information Technology, Nicolet Area Technical College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

This session is a synopsis of eight workshops available through NISOD in either a Campus or Regional Workshop format. Hear about available workshop topics from eight NISOD workshop facilitators, learn specifics of the two workshop formats, and discover how you can have a workshop brought to your campus.

Edward Leach, Executive Director, NISOD; David Katz, Executive Director of Organizational Development, Mohawk Valley Community College; Ericka Landry, Director, Lone Star College System; Erik Christensen, Faculty, South Florida State College; Marcus Williams, Content Leader, Newton High School; Nicole Matos, Professor, College of DuPage; Shelagh Rose, Year One Pathways Lead , Pasadena City College; Pamela Tolbert-Bynum Rivers, Founder and President, Steps Beyond Remediation

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 616A, 6th Floor

NISOD and ACUE launched a major collaboration last year to advance faculty and student success through quality instruction at community and technical colleges nationwide. Leaders from NISOD and ACUE discuss the significance of this collaboration and new offerings available to NISOD member faculty, including a series of regional credit-bearing seminars. These unique, blended-learning opportunities allow faculty to earn digital badges as credit toward ACUE’s Certificate in Effective College Instruction, a nationally recognized credential endorsed by and co-issued with the American Council on Education (ACE). Session attendees will be the first to engage in an interactive mini-seminar experience on using active learning techniques in their classes to increase student engagement and learning.  

Jonathan Gyurko, CEO and Founder, Association of College and University Educators; Edward Leach, Executive Director, NISOD; Laurie Pendleton, Executive Director, ACUE

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 616A, 6th Floor

Differences are what make classrooms rich for learning.This session examines how culture potentially impacts teaching, learning, communications, viewpoints, and misconceptions.There is a focus on collaborative learning techniques and activities that encourage discussion among diverse student populations regarding topics such as ethics, culture, expectations, and different communication strategies to be successful inside and outside of the classroom.

Julie Smith-Stewart, Adjunct Faculty, Community College of Aurora; Kentina Smith, Associate Professor, Anne Arundel Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Is your institution struggling to successfully prepare faculty to teach online? Best Practices for Teaching Online is a professional development program for faculty developed in partnership with NISOD member institutions. Come learn about this exciting new program, details on the partnership, institutions involved in the development process, and how your faculty can benefit from the newly created, openly accessible course! This program officially launches at the 2019 NISOD conference.

Steve Sosa, Dean, eLearning and Instructional Support, Mountain View College; Stephanie Scroggins, Executive Dean, Social Sciences, Mountain View College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 615B, 6th Floor

Are you interested in understanding the foundations of a quality online or blended program? Join us in playing “Quality Jeopardy” to learn about the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) Quality Scorecard. This session focuses on the importance of measuring quality at the course, program, and department levels. We also discuss ways the OLC Quality Scorecard can be used for measuring performance in developing and administering an online or blended program.

Matt Norsworthy, Senior Manager, Partnerships, Online Learning Consortium

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

By putting key best practices into action, professors, instructors and student success staff can create a campus learning environment both in and out of the classroom where military connected students thrive. Outcomes: Professors and instructors will learn how to provide a consistent yet supportive learning environment for military connected students in the classroom; and Student Success Staff will learn about additional supports and services that can be put into place to aid military connected students

Tammy Micallef, Director, Student Success, San Antonio College; Jessica Guire, Faculty, Baker College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Parents Lead is an innovative, cohort-based scholarship and degree pathway program that provides funding for students who struggle to attend college because of the cost and scheduling complications of child care. The program curriculum is carefully designed to maximize working parents’ scholarship dollars by offering blended coursework for the first 31 credits of their associate degree, allowing them to complete general education requirements. Think through the internal and external barriers student-parents face at your institutions and learn how we chose to implement our program as we have.

Anne Hofmann, Associate Professor, English and Parents Lead Program Manager, Frederick Community College; Brian Stipelman, Dean, Arts and Sciences, Frederick Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

This presentation focuses on a program that provides a pathway for students completing a Certificate in a healthcare discipline or who have professional experiences, credentials, and/or apprenticeship training in healthcare but no degree, to earn their AAS degree in Health Sciences. Discussion will also include how to develop and evaluate an experiential learning portfolio for college credit. Participants will receive a copy of the Experiential Learning Portfolio Student Guide used in the program.

Michael Laman, Professor, Roane State Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

The Pathways model is quickly transforming the traditional community college model of education. Beginning with individual student services and academics efforts, the model now transcends traditional divisions. St. Petersburg College has been developing Pathways work for over seven years. Participants will learn about the Four Dimensions of the Pathways model, what St. Petersburg College learned through implementation, and how practices and policies have evolved to create a clear line-of-sight for students moving from passion to profession.

Jamelle Conner, Vice President, Student Affairs, St. Petersburg College; Joseph Leopold, Dean, St. Petersburg College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

Millennial males who study nursing are breaking traditions by joining a primarily female workforce. As such, they bring opportunity for different approaches to nurse education. Increase your awareness of issues that millennial males face in today's educational nursing climate, and learn classroom and online approaches to meet their educational needs.

Daniela Brink, Instructor, ASN and Course Lead, Advanced Mental Health Nursing, Ozarks Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

There is no widespread agreement on what it means to personalize the learning experience; however, there is agreement that the learning activities must be meaningful and relevant to learners. Through sharing personal experiences and using active learning strategies, students can build meaningful relationships based on respect, trust, and belonging. Participants will gather ideas and have time to reflect on strategies that can be used to create a diverse and inclusive classroom.

Jon Oaks, Professor, Macomb Community College; Semira Taheri, Assistant Professor, Lone Star College System

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

The College-Readiness Academy is a program that promotes whole-campus mentoring, provides intrusive academic and financial aid advising, and connects freshmen with peers, faculty, and staff. The program reduces the disproportionate impact of under-preparedness on first-generation college students and other at-risk populations. It is also an effective professional development opportunity. Students who attend the program are significantly more successful and persist at a higher rate than students who do not participate in the program.

Kimberly Bligh, Department Chair, Education and Faculty Director, Title V, Bakersfield College; Isabel Castaneda, Education Advisor, Bakersfield College; Jessica Wojtysiak, Guided Pathways Faculty Chair and Faculty, Education Department, Bakersfield College; Teresa McAllister, Faculty, Education, Bakersfield College; Erica Menchaca, Faculty and Curriculum Co-Chair, Education , Bakersfield College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Students from traditionally marginalized segments of society often arrive to higher education without the confidence they need to challenge themselves and reach their educational goals. Do your students have enough confidence to ask questions? Can they admit that they don’t understand something? Learn how to use technology to help build confidence in students who never speak up.

Susan Long, Dean, Richland Community College; Jill Buettner, Faculty, Richland College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

San Antonio College created the #RangerReady campaign in response to an overwhelming push for high school students to apply to four-year universities, regardless of college readiness or financial ability. San Antonio College wanted students to feel pride about their choice to attend a community college and connected to the college-going community and their peers. Learn how #RangerReady ensures that students feel connected and motivated even before they are an “official” student on campus.

Lenell Clay, Senior Advisor, San Antonio College; Nicole France, Senior Coordinator, San Antonio College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

Recruitment and retention of STEM faculty from diverse backgrounds is a significant challenge for community colleges. To generate practice-based dialogue on strategies for improvement, this session introduces an evidence-based model and self-assessment tool that supports institutional progress towards diversity and inclusion among STEM faculty. After the introduction, presenters facilitate conversations around enhancements needed to recalibrate the model and self-assessment tool specific to community college contexts.

Lorenzo Baber, Associate Professor, Iowa State University; Craig Ogilvie, Morrill Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Science and Assistant Dean, Graduate College, Iowa State University; Mary Darrow, , Assistant Director, IINSPIRE-LSAMP/Aspire, Iowa State University

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

The data are clear: strategic scheduling can significantly impact student success, retention, and completion. Yet, from the perspective of academic administrators, faculty, and support staff, the challenges of embarking on a major scheduling redesign is daunting and fraught with political and practical challenges. Learn how faculty and administrators in the liberal arts are leading change by achieving consensus and resolving a range of contractual and instructional issues to develop more student-centered scheduling.

Sheldon Walcher, Dean, The College of Lake County; Linsey Cuti, Professor, Kankakee Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

As a part of the STEM Certificate offered at Seminole State, students are required to complete lower-division science courses in their intended major. In addition, a series of seminar courses have been developed to enrich the experience and increase preparation for upper-division coursework. Seminars in Research, Career Pathways, and Environment are offered in alternating semesters. Participants discuss the content, approach, and student perceptions of these seminar courses.

Deborah Mead, Professor, Chemistry, Seminole State College of Florida; Amee Mehta, Professor , Biology, Seminole State College of Florida

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 615A, 6th Floor

In a time of record low unemployment and an increased demand for skilled workers, we have developed a training model to skill-up inmates in Indiana. The product of a statewide partnership between Ivy Tech Community College and the Indiana Department of Correction, this model provides inmates the opportunity to earn nationally recognized industry certifications in high-demand fields such as welding, Computer Numerical control (CNC) operation, and manufacturing processes.

Molly Dodge, Chancellor, Ivy Tech Community College – Terre Haute; Paula Clark, Workforce Alignment Consultant, Ivy Tech Community College – Madison; Rod Dowell, Workforce Alignment Consultant, Ivy Tech Community College – Terre Haute

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

What lessons for building persistence can mobile-friendly online gaming and retail teach higher education? They can help students understand “cognitive load” and how to shift knowledge into long-term memory. Learn how Bossier Parish Community College’s (BPCC) open educational resources (OER) refresher courses, built upon cognitive applications for learning, online engagement, and deep-game structure, help power at-risk students toward completion. You'll learn cognitive, science-based strategies for teaching underprepared students and get access to BPCC’s free site to take back to your students.

Allison Martin, Director, Bossier Parish Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

During this session, participants define social learning and acquiring versus performing. Come discuss what students find attractive about instructors and learn how to read students’ reactions. Explore the four separate processes that learning by observing involves: attention, retention, production, and motivation. Participants also review Reciprocal Determinism and how this impacts interaction and behavior and consider how observational learning influences learning.

Christian Garrett, Educational Technology Training Coordinator, Bossier Parish Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

Making the most of the Guided Pathway approach to higher education in many of its work-ready programs, Montgomery County Community College students are able to build multi-layered success. This presentation highlights the collaborative steps taken within academic divisions and workforce development to map and implement opportunities for stackable credentials and immersive programming that combine targeted training and coursework with on-the-job experience to quickly get credentialed graduates into the job market.

John DePinto, Director, Culinary Arts Institute, Montgomery County Community College; Gloria Oikelome, Dean, Montgomery County Community College; Tracy Kaiser-Goebel, Director, Educational Effectiveness, Montgomery County Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Does your campus need a student success center? During this session, spend time learning how to build a roadmap and implement a timeline for opening one! Participants learn communication and leveraging strategies that can be used to sell a student success center to senior administration, how to use existing resources to begin a student success center from the ground up, and develop a simple plan for your college’s own success center.

Craig Sasser, Executive Vice President, Northeast Mississippi Community College; Michelle Baragona, Vice President, Instruction, Northeast Mississippi Community College; Ray Scott, Vice President, Students, Northeast Mississippi Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

The presenters pioneered an effort to bring STEM technologies to regional educational partners in 27 public school districts within the region by transforming a 53’ long, expandable semi-trailer into a one-of-a-kind mobile learning environment with innovative, hands-on tools that deliver new ways of learning and teaching. Get trained to use these interactive hardware and software platforms that allow you and your students to visualize, create, and experience learning in ways not possible in traditional classrooms.

Jill Dobson, STEM Coordinator, Hawkeye Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Because leadership opportunities exist at all levels of organizations, LEAD Academy, a year-long program for staff and faculty, empowers employees with effective leadership skills and strategies. Presenters discuss the initial program’s curriculum, format, and schedule. Statistics and program graduates demonstrate how the college adjusted and refreshed the structure of activities while examining the impact on employee retention, satisfaction, and empowerment, as well as student retention over the last five years.

John Brady, Director, Professional Development, Daytona State College; Dr. Joy Lewis, Associate Professor, Daytona State College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

This presentation encompasses a variety of activities that foster validation and a sense of belonging in the classroom through interactive, cooperative group activities. Leave armed with new activities that you can implement in your classroom immediately, including technologies that foster validation and fun ways of learning in the classroom.

Anna Alaniz, Ascender Coordinator, South Texas College; Saul Garza, CLE Coordinator, South Texas College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

This session highlights the range of issues facing community colleges and their faculty and leaders, including those across the political and social landscapes. Participants engage in conversations about how their colleges are addressing selected issues and delve into two specifically interrelated areas: developmental education and the underprepared student. Discussions focus on guided pathways, corequisite models, and articulation as vehicles for pathways to completion, persistence, and success.

Roberta Teahen, Director, Doctorate in Community College Leadership, Ferris State University (CCLP); Rebecca Duncan-Ramirez, Executive Director, Lone Star College; Denise Lujan, Director, Developmental Math, University of Texas at El Paso

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

College of the Ouachitas (COTO) is using recent grant funding to strengthen its distance education courses and online student services. The presenters share how COTO has found creative ways to use maximize its learning management system to generate new online student services that offer convenience and accessibility for all students. How COTO uses grants to strengthen online retention through online student services will also be discussed.

Chris Robbins, Director, Distance Education and Title III Project Manager, College of the Ouachitas; Ronna Pennington, Distance Education Support Specialist, College of the Ouachitas; Keesha Johnson, Director of Admissions, College of the Ouachitas; Allison Malone, Director, Learning and Library Resource Center, College of the Ouachitas

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

A technical college and a four-year university present an innovative partnership to deliver a state-approved high school career and technical education (CTE) teacher preparation program. Presenters from Northcentral Technical College and Marian University share the evolution of their model and engage participants with an Innovative Teacher Education Partnership Toolkit to identify strategies for building teacher preparation program partnerships, including alignment of goals and mission, curriculum development, marketing, advising, financial aid, and more.

Kelly Chaney, Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs, Marian University of Wisconsin; Jeannie Worden, Executive Vice President, Northcentral Technical College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

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For the past four years, the presenters have organized an annual science fair and have learned a great deal about student engagement, science communication, leadership development, and creating a young generation’s interest in science. Learn how the fair is organized, how students are incentivized to participate, how to generate donations for prizes, and outcomes of the program.

Gaumani Gyanwali, Instructor, Chemistry, University of Arkansas Community College at Rich Mountain

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Regardless of the discipline, we all want our students to be able to effectively communicate about subject matter. During this session, participants develop a framework for a presentation assignment that builds students’ confidence and enhances their public speaking skills. Come discuss a variety of presentation formats (ever hear of Pecha Kucha?), presentational aids, how to prepare students for public speaking, and what goes into assessing student presentations (finally learn the difference between a “good” and “very good” rating!).

Scott O'Daniel, Program Chair and Associate Professor, Communication; Coordinator, ASAP, Ivy Tech Community College – Evansville; James Boldman III, Program Chair, Communications, Foreign Languages and Special Projects, Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

Learn how three faculty and staff members at a community college in the Midwest focused their respective dissertations on issues surrounding improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in and outside college classrooms. African-American male college students and dual-enrolled students’ challenges and successes are specifically highlighted. Participants learn innovative practices that help close the equity gap on their own campuses and an interactive learning activity engages participants in a simulation of what underserved students experience as they navigate the college-going process

Tina Hummons, Registrar, Sinclair Community College; Heidi McGrew, Associate Professor, Sinclair Community College; Stanley Kirkman, Director, Student Affairs, Sinclair Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

The Project for Relevant and Improved Mathematics Education (PRIME) is a network of community colleges that continually work on improving outcomes for developmental mathematics students by aligning, streamlining, and contextualizing course offerings. Learn about redeveloping your curricular offerings and hear suggestions for implementing similar changes in your developmental sequences. Participants discuss mathematics offerings at their own institutions and start the process of developing or improving their own corequisite courses.

Anders Stachelek, Assistant Professor, Hostos Community College; Olen Dias, Professor, Hostos Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

This presentation walks you through the steps one college took to measure the achievement of the college’s core competencies with the learning management system Canvas. By the end of this session, participants are able to use outcomes available on Canvas in their own assessment process. You will also learn to use data from Canvas to assess student learning and improve curriculum.

Julie Lavender, Vice President, Instructional Services, Kirtland Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Participants learn about dual enrollment models offered to economically disadvantaged students from schools that feed into Miami Dade College-InterAmerican’s campus. The facilitators present models that align with high school programs and curricula, priming first-generation students for college success and accelerating their progress toward degree completion. Participants create a customized model of dual enrollment appropriate to their college and receive sample materials for use at their respective institutions.

Michelle Ploetz, Associate Dean, Faculty, Miami Dade College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Connecting concepts to something personally meaningful will help students to see the relevancy and meaningfulness in the concepts and lessons you present to them. When a new concept is introduced, students often feel lost or overwhelmed, especially when they are asked to explain it. The Synectic Journey not only creates meaningfulness but helps students to develop critical thinking through deepening their understanding and personal connection to the concept.

Cyndee Kawalek, Educational Trainer and Consultant, Cyndee's Teacher Training

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

This session explores the role assessment plays in expanding and improving corequisite developmental education programs. We outline Onondaga Community College’s (OCC) use of three intersecting layers of assessment: institutional-readiness (personnel, course structures, and on-campus support); operations (placement, advising, and registration); and outcomes (success rates, retention, and skills transfer). Participants group by institutional role and use OCC as a test case for planning and refining their own corequisite assessment programs.

Matt DelConte, Assistant Professor and Director, SUNY Developmental English Learning Community, Onondaga Community College; Michael O'Connor, Associate Professor and Department Chair, English, Onondaga Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 416AB, 4th Floor

A powerful tool for culture and engagement, quality podcasts can highlight key initiatives and bring people together. A college president and state community college association president outline how they used podcasting as an engagement tool on a college campus and as an advocacy tool with state higher education leaders, legislators, and policy makers. Helpful tips are provided about how to plan, produce, and deploy podcasts that bring campuses together and promote awareness of college issues in state government.

Steve Robinson, President, Owens Community College; Jack Hershey, President and CEO, Ohio Association of Community Colleges

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

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Using The Wizard of Oz as a framework, the presenters discuss implementing transformational leadership principles in the classroom. Participants engage in a creative survey activity to identify their leadership strengths, followed by sharing teaching practices using buzz groups. At the end of this session, participants are able to identify transformational leadership traits, reflect on personal transformational leadership characteristics, and recognize teaching strategies that align with personal leadership strengths.

Kari Henry Hulett, Faculty, English, Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology; Maria Christian, Assistant Professor, Higher Education Leadership, Northeastern State University

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Many professional development opportunities emphasize skill development and alignment with organizational mission. Learn how two college’s transformed perspectives and practices for a disinterested and disengaged community by using micro-learning professional development. The presenters incorporated infographics, targeted emails, culturally-responsive teaching, culture building, and transformative learning. Participants discuss the process, lessons learned, and the initiative’s impact.          

Mary-Kate Najarian, Assistant Director, Information Technology, Montgomery County Community College; Sonya McCoy-Wilson, Dean, Arts and Sciences, Atlanta Technical College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 615A, 6th Floor

Looking for a research-based method for transitioning English Language Learners into college-level academic courses? Through innovations in curriculum and use of team teaching, Lake Washington's Academic I-BEST (Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training) pathway allows higher-level English Language Learners to enter required academic courses immediately instead of spending time in lengthy remedial sequences. An Academic I-BEST faculty team leads this interactive session to demonstrate how the model works and provide research supporting its effectiveness.

Doug Emory, Dean, Lake Washington Institute of Technology; Karen Lee, Faculty, Lake Washington Institute of Technology; Linda Raymond, Faculty, Lake Washington Institute of Technology; Stephanie Walsh, Faculty, Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

As the workplace places greater emphasis on collaboration and innovation, instructors are challenged to evolve teaching methods to better meet students’ needs. With the support of new technologies, faculty are integrating active-learning methods into the classroom in various ways. In this session, the audience will hear how students engaged in an active-learning pilot at Metropolitan Community College-Kansas City and learn about the qualitative and quantitative results. Attendees should bring a laptop/mobile device.

Jason Pallett, Faculty, Mathematics, Metropolitan Community College – Kansas City

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

This session is a non-judgement zone. Real scenarios about race, gender, religion, and income inequities in the classroom are used to drive small group discussions. Student voices and experiences are heard via video clips and written replies to prompts. Participants leave with possible responses to distressing situations and a plan of action to start courageous conversations around uncomfortable topics on their campuses.

Angie Williams-Chehmani, Associate Dean, Macomb Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

The college syllabus is one of the most important tools we design for students. However, after the first day of class most students never look at their syllabi again. This session encourages you to take a fresh start with your syllabi. Please bring your laptop to the session so you can begin working on designing an effective syllabus for one or more of your courses.

Cyndee Kawalek, Educational Trainer and Consultant, Cyndee's Teacher Training

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Hope is the belief that the tomorrow will be better than today and that you have the power to make that happen. Research shows that increased hope in students leads to a 12 percent gain in academic performance. During this session, participants have the opportunity to explore how to help students develop the core competencies of hope, goals, agency, and pathways. Participants are asked to provide their best practices to increase hope of their students and will leave with a working knowledge of how to encourage hopeful thinking.

Scott Geddis, Faculty, Phoenix College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 412, 4th Floor

In this fast-paced session, participants learn how Simple Syllabus gives students better access to information, reduces faculty workload, and streamlines compliance activities through a centralized syllabus management platform. See Simple Syllabus in action and learn how its powerful reporting module turns a syllabus into data that can be used to improve organizational outcomes.

Gina Monaghan, Vice President, Client Services, Simple Syllabus

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 615B, 6th Floor

This session examines the power of truth and how to find the truth to make a positive difference in your personal and professional life. Most of us know some signs of deception, but not all of them. The presenters aggregate psychological, physiological, and human expectations principles to give you a comprehensive system and model to make truth-based decisions in dealing with students, hiring employees, building relationships, and more.

Richard Parra, Professor, Mountain View College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 415A, 4th Floor

Louisiana Higher Education experienced several years of fiscal challenges. Recently, Louisiana’s Community and Technical Colleges assembled a diverse taskforce to better understand faculty morale and its impact. This session presents initiatives developed to acknowledge faculty experiences with contracts, compensation, leave, and workload. Four chancellors share the initiatives and goals established by the taskforce to improve faculty development and support for a heightened work experience.

William Wainwright, Chancellor, Delgado Community College; Dennis Epps, Chancellor, Louisiana Delta Community College; Jimmy Sawtelle, Chancellor, Central Louisiana Technical Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

The “Active Learning Classroom” enhances engagement and learning. However, students often resist active learning and need some time to make the adjustment. This session considers the effects of gradually moving pedagogy toward the flipped classroom by comparing introductory accounting classes from two institutions. Participants discuss the preparedness of first-year students, findings on the effects of changing pedagogical approach during a term, and strategies for preparing students for the active learning classroom.

Rick Robinson, Instructor, Medicine Hat College; Sheryl Boisvert, Instructor, Norquest College

Takes place on Sunday, 10 – 11 a.m., Room 414, 4th Floor

Problem-based learning challenges students to solve relevant problems through immersive experiences in mid- to large-scale projects. Students work in a flipped classroom environment that relies on multimedia and online content, while class time is used for individual and group development of solutions to complex problems. Come discuss how we have brought this teaching strategy to our campus and how administrators can support teaching innovation among their faculty.

Eric Madrid, Assistant Professor, Northwest Vista College; Jacob Crandall, Instructor, Northwest Vista College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 406, 4th Floor

Shared governance is a stakeholder driven system founded on principles of openness, transparency, and inclusiveness. It requires that partners from all stakeholder groups take ownership and contribute to accountability-based decisions. Participants walk through the steps taken by Madison College to create and foster a successful shared governance experience.

Penny Johnson, Faculty, Madison Area Technical College; Ann Camillo, Shared Governance System Coordinator, Madison Area Technical College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Room 400, 4th Floor

First-generation students and their families have very different barriers and roadblocks. This workshop provides information, resources, and trends regarding first-generation students and how to build the necessary supports these students need to be successful in the college environment.

Katherine Trombley, Director, Genesee Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Enough lectures and PowerPoints! Did you know you have an inner playwright waiting to emerge? During this session, study and perform examples that show how all instructors can easily use playwriting in courses ranging from composition to welding. Participants learn and apply theatrical elements to any course they teach and leave the session with the makings of their own original play to use in class.

Jonathan Howle, Director, Faculty and Staff Development, Wilkes Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Inclusion is about finding common stories and common bonds. Come and discuss how cultural artifacts solidify and bring together students who may otherwise feel that they have little in common. Participants discuss their own definitions of culture and can share a cultural artifact of their own (an item, token, memory, or story that is part of their personal cultural narrative). Examples of how cultural artifact presentations are used across the curriculum at Sussex County Community College, including at our annual Multicultural Luncheon, are provided.

Melanie Arpaio, Associate Professor, Sussex County Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Room 402, 4th Floor

Madison College used an innovative, data-informed process to determine priorities for its strategic academic plan. This presentation outlines the yearlong research process the college developed to assess the outcome of the previous strategic academic plan, to better understand the impact of demographic changes, and to evaluate opportunities in the academic portfolio. Special attention is paid to how you can use data gathered through a research process to frame productive discussions about priorities with college stakeholders.

Shawna Carter, Associate Vice President, Madison Area Technical College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Room 417A, 4th Floor

Formative data—early information about in-progress experiences and behaviors that are often foundational to student success—can be a powerful student success tool. However, understanding how to systematically review and evaluate the usefulness of those data can be difficult. This session describes a simple and practical framework for evaluating formative data, using concrete examples to illustrate its ability to impact student success.

Matthew Venaas, Research Manager, Macmillan Learning; Mandy Shaffer, Market Development Manager, Macmillan Learning

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Learning styles not only affect how we learn, but how we teach. Recognizing why we teach as we do helps instructors to teach more effectively and improve student learning and understanding. Participants engage in understanding their learning styles and how they can use that information to improve their teaching efficacy. Leaders also lead participants in a dialogue and brainstorming session to identify effective teaching techniques.

Kelli Kreider, Department Chair and Associate Professor, Ivy Tech Community College – Fort Wayne; Darrel Kesler, Dean and Professor, Ivy Tech Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Room 615A, 6th Floor

Participants will learn how to improve success of female students in the STEM fields. Scholarly research showing that inclusion supports engagement and retention of female technology workers will be presented. This same work environment supports female STEM faculty in serving as role models required to support STEM student success. Knowledge of self-determination strategies required to create inclusion and engagement will be presented. Participants will learn how to create a mentoring program at their colleges.

Denise Barton, Senior Professor, Business Administration and EPIC Mentoring Coordinator, Wake Tech Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

Kirtland Community College is a small, rural, commuter college with military-connected students at three college locations. In an effort to provide meaningful experiences and connections for those students, the college set up a virtual student veteran lounge using the college’s learning management system (LMS). Learn how to set up a virtual student veteran lounge using your college’s LMS. Presenters also discuss opportunities and challenges to providing veteran support services at a commuter college with multiple locations.

Julie Lavender, Vice President, Instructional Services, Kirtland Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor

This breakout session focuses on two Houston area community colleges that developed weekend college programs to reach the nontraditional student and promote their successful completion. The session will focus on need for a nontraditional course structure to promote the success of the nontraditional student. The presenters will discuss the similarities and differences between the two independently developed programs, the challenges faced during development and implementation and the successful student outcomes.

Monica Martinez, Director, FITW Weekend College, Lee College

Takes place on Sunday, 8:45 – 9:45 a.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

The emerging field of Positive Education holds great promise for improving student outcomes in terms of both performance and persistence. An escalating need for evidence-based practices has led to a burgeoning of empirical studies and data collection in the US, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Come and find out how the study of human flourishing has impacted education in all sectors.

Jeannette Sullivan, Professor, Palm Beach State College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 410, 4th Floor

Children who experience adversity may eventually attend college. Do their past experiences impact their academic futures? The Resiliency Study attempts to discover the relationship between childhood adversity and academic outcomes at St. Philip’s College. The presenters share the findings of the study and focus on strategies based on the Self-Determination Theory and Growth Mindset that colleges can use to mitigate the effects of trauma and promote student resilience.

Jen Osborne, Instructor, St. Philip's College; Eitandria Tello, Counselor, St. Philip's College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Room 404, 4th Floor

One of the many strengths of the School of Education program at Daytona State College is its collaboration with local school districts, principals, and teachers. In addition to a graduate employment rate of over 85 percent, these relationships have also produced valuable feedback for programmatic improvements and professional development. Using an interactive digital platform, session participants learn how to network and develop successful partnerships that benefit college and community workforce partners.

Margie Hensler, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair, Daytona State College; Ana Blaine, Associate Professor and Clinical Supervisor, Daytona State College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Room 417B, 4th Floor

Research suggests that students continue to struggle with feeling disconnected in online courses. In this session, we will take on the mindset of students and consider what they see on the first day “walking” into an online classroom. We will talk about the importance of human connection and creating a classroom community, even when students never see one another.

Maureen Walters, Instructor, English and Instructional Designer, Vance-Granville Community College; Marynia Giren-Navarro, Instructor, Sociology, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Developed as a collaboration between an English professor and a professional game designer, “Eat the Poor” is a game that places students into the irreverent, satirical world of Jonathan Swift's “A Modest Proposal” to develop deeper insights into Swift’s society. This session uses the “Eat the Poor” game as a case study to introduce fundamental game design techniques and show how they can be used to create classroom games that enrich student learning.

Jeff Johannigman, Faculty Development Coordinator, Austin Community College; Jill Bosche, Assistant Professor, Austin Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Room 408, 4th Floor

Students in first-year composition courses write first-person narratives and attempt to make sense of their sometimes-traumatic life experiences, assign personal meaning, and gain mastery over their storyline and voice. The writing process can help change their mindset and reshape their future. Alternatively, the "gravestone" narrative allows students to invent a historically accurate fiction resulting in provocative discussion and research on local history, including women's rights and segregation. Student examples, activities, and handouts will be provided.

Donna Nalley, Director, South University; Leslie Braniger, Instructor, National Park College

Takes place on Tuesday, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., Room 415B, 4th Floor


Roundtable Discussions

Gain new knowledge on how to effectively teach English to non-native speakers and insights into breaking cultural barriers during this instructional and interactive presentation. The activities during the presentation are a simulation of the exercises you can use to build international students’ writing and critical thinking skills, including a candy-based exercise, a pre-designed writing template, and team collaboration.

Ali Khalil, Instructor, English, Arkansas State University Mid-South

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 2, 6th Floor

Engagement is often enhanced when students are actively leading events and become actual initiators of the college experience. For example, instead of watching a lecture, students give lectures; instead of watching films, students make films; instead of viewing performers, students become performers. Borrowing cues from NPR’s StoryCorps project, The Moth Radio Hour, and other participatory programs, this Roundtable Discussion invites participants to share and model experiential learning by dialoguing and providing their own narratives.

Stuart Lenig, Faculty, Humanities, Columbia State Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 2, 6th Floor

Learn how Tarrant County College Northwest Campus (TCC NW Campus) made drastic changes to existing ESL and GED programs for which data showed minimal progress. Discussion includes how TCC NW Campus explored and implemented new assessment tools, collaborated with key campus services to create opportunities for students to easily transition into college, and hired with intent. Session outcomes include learning and sharing best practices and how to take innovative, educated risks to improve student success.

Lourdes Davenport, Coordinator, Tarrant County College District

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

Student selection has long been a source of confusion because there are as many different processes as there are colleges. Is there a better way, one that is less subjective, more responsive to current industry demands, more efficient, and fairer? During this presentation, look at the possible role of aptitude exams coupled with prerequisites as the sole method of finding suitable candidates for college programs.

Rodel Padua, Instructor, Respiratory Therapy, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 2, 6th Floor

As educators, we strive to cultivate a learning environment where students are engaged in course content so that new information directly supports their learning and unique goals. It was from this perspective that a learning process called Experience, Logic, Application, and Innovation (ELAI), a scaffolded approach to experientially-grounded learning, developed. This presentation provides an overview of the ELAI process, offers training suggestions, demonstrates methods for using ELAI to support student retention, and shares data-based conclusions about the program’s process to facilitate student learning in ten life-advancing skills.

Jillian Yarbrough, Clinical Assistant Professor, West Texas A&M University; Ann Fry, Director, First Year Experience and Learning Communities, West Texas A&M University

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

Second-language classrooms present unique environments where student engagement remains the primary determinant of success. During this session, participants explore linking diversity to the development of language and various methodologies that influence student engagement through the integration of culture into curriculum. In addition, participants are provided with an opportunity to learn about The Language Institute at El Paso Community College’s innovative showcases for student progress.

Majd Sarah, Faculty, ESL, El Paso Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 2, 6th Floor

Navigating the higher education system is challenging for many 21st century community college students who find themselves juggling multiple responsibilities when they arrive on campus. Despite knowing this, faculty wonder why students can’t focus on coursework. If only educators could listen to their voices, though! During this session, learn strategies for engaging and supporting students, proactive mentoring and advising approaches to encourage persistence, and how to strengthen and develop relationships between faculty and students.

Lara Akinyemi, Special Programs Coordinator and Adjunct Faculty, Bristol Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

Learn how to build a pre-semester “Boot Camp” into your existing learning management system using three mediums: text, videos, and online quizzing. Tips for continuing a course with similar lessons and integrating a grading scheme that incentivizes students to complete the Boot Camp will also be shared. Generation of statistical comparisons of different sub-groups of students to identify the effectiveness of the Boot Camp activity will also be demonstrated.

George Dombi, Lecturer, University of Rhode Island

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

From childhood, many students are told to work hard, get good grades, go to a good college, and get a good job. However, most of the time “attending a good college” does not include “enrolling at a community college.” This pervasive stigma is not only inconsiderate, but misleading: community colleges offer a transformational opportunity for those who seek to explore postsecondary educational endeavors. Gain insight into the benefits of guided pathways and apprentice tracks including how students can earn credentials that significantly and immediately improve earning potential.

Mia Taylor, Faculty, Houston Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

The Start2Finish Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) entails a new approach to assisting Hillsborough Community College’s (HCC) first-time-in-college students. A key creator of HCC's Start2Finish QEP explains how to develop, implement, and measure a large-scale, first-time-in-college retention effort. Participants brainstorm practical applications of Start2Finish outcomes and assessment strategies and learn what did and did not work during the first years of implementation at HCC.

Jennifer Gangi, Academic Assessment Officer, Hillsborough Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

Share and examine activities to engage students currently practiced in your classroom and how these activities ensure learning. Participants are encouraged to brainstorm with other participants in small groups and are challenged to reflect on adding and executing new ideas and activities into their classrooms. Upon completion of this session, participants are able to identify what activities and strategies ensure student engagement and learning in the classroom.

JoAnna Cupp, Interim Program Director and Assistant Professor, Arkansas State University Mid-South

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

Participants examine and understand the skills and challenges military and veteran students bring to the classroom. Learn effective communication tips for one-on-one and classroom interactions and the role faculty plays in helping to support students with potential mental health disorders (PTSD, depression, etc.). Additionally, participants will share best practices to leverage military and veteran students’ strengths acquired from training and service.

Paul Kohara, Professor, DeVry University

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

It’s not an overstatement to say that English is a global language. While many non-native speakers are exposed to the English Language in their home countries, they often feel disenfranchised in American colleges because they do not share the same cultural background knowledge as native speakers. Participants explore the concept of English as a global language and address specific, effective strategies that faculty can implement to better include and empower the culturally and linguistically diverse learners in their classrooms.

Forster Agama, Professor, Englsh, Tallahassee Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

During this session, the presenter discusses five easy keys that can be used to help students succeed in information technology after two years of college. The presenter addresses the “most expected” degree, certifications, knowledge and skills, experience, and networking from IT students. Participants should be prepared to discuss and share scenarios and to hear other faculty testimonials.

Emmanuel Luke, Instructor, Information Technology, Mid-Plains Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 2, 6th Floor

The four-part Potter Box establishes an iterative process for ethical decision making that should underlie the scientific method and critical thinking accompanying academic research in any discipline. This presentation sets forth the history and development of The Box, its applicability in various disciplinary and cultural milieu, and its special utility for us in a world where negotiating “ethics” and “ethical behavior” have become of utmost import. The four steps of the Potter Box are presented and participants are invited to apply its steps to their own fields of interest.

Katherine Watson, Professor, Coastline Community College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

From hypothesis formation through data collection to analysis and interpretations, discover a single, multistep project that simultaneously assesses multiple outcomes and engages students. The learning of method is enhanced in this fun and involved project where students conduct a survey that investigates Kohlberg's moral reasoning, as well as consideration of Individualistic versus Collectivistic tendencies, to critically examine their assumptions.

Randy Simonson, Professor, Psychology, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 2, 6th Floor

Classcraft, an online role-playing game, can be integrated into almost any course (from K through post-secondary). This game-based learning (GBL) technology positively impacts student satisfaction, motivation, and engagement; it also encourages teamwork, cooperative problem-solving, and interaction. In this session, you will set up your own avatars, game rules, learning quests, random events, and point structures, so that you can implement GBL in your classes and be responsive to your learners' preferences.

Kirsten Fantazir, Faculty, Lethbridge College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

What happens when students can take courses without reading placement tests or prerequisite English courses? They can complete a certificate program, but struggle with writing as a result. To better support our students, we piloted a six-session writing module in an Introduction to Early Childhood Education course. The goal was to increase students’ confidence with writing while helping them learn to organize and write a persuasive essay. Review the survey data from the initiative and participate in several of the lessons from the writing curriculum used.

Tamara Reynolds, Instructor, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

There are a lot of changes coming to curricula, scheduling, and how classes are delivered. This is a confusing time for students, but effective communication is a determining factor in understanding. Our goal is to meet students where they are and help them be successful. But what does that look like right now? Join us and lend your voice to this discussion about what’s working and what we can change to ensure student success.

Lupita Narkevicius, Student Services Assistant and Adjunct Faculty, Los Angeles Pierce College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

With the passing of HB2223, institutions across Texas are required to offer developmental courses using a corequisite model, presenting unique challenges for administrators and faculty. Over the past two years, the Developmental Math Department at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has worked to create and implement developmental math courses using a corequisite model. This presentation highlights the UTEP model, shares administrative procedures used for implementation, and discusses what did and didn’t work.

Denise Lujan, Director, Developmental Math, The University of Texas at El Paso

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 2, 6th Floor

Undergraduate research is an effective teaching tool that can significantly impact student success. However, developing a research program requires innovation. How can we bridge that gap? Come prepared to discuss why undergraduate research should be an integral component of your curriculum and learn how you can create an authentic program. The presenter shares some existing ideas and helps the audience brainstorm ideas that work for them.

Laura Briggs, Professor, Undergraduate Research Coordinator, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

Join this Roundtable Discussion led by a retired police sergeant and Criminal Justice Program Coordinator who questions if criminal justice (CJ) education at community colleges holds the potential to indoctrinate negative career practices and contribute to systemic issues within the CJ system and police. Conflict theory aligns with this view in that underlying congruent tones become prevalent as CJ pedagogical teachings influence the overall CJ educational experience. This discussion welcomes perspectives among CJ faculty that open minds to the idea that biased criminal justice education gives birth toward systemic issues among our police.

Kevin Hermes, Program Coordinator, Illinois Valley Community College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

Inability to unravel the logic underlying mathematical statements or procedures hinders student comprehension of the full implications of solving math problems. Yet, mathematical logic is not widely addressed, particularly at the community college level. Using artifacts from community college courses, the presenter illustrates logical components intertwined in mathematics and how well these are understood and appreciated by students. Participants have an opportunity to evaluate the importance of such components and discuss how to incorporate them into their lessons.

Whan Ki Lee, Assistant Professor, Queensborough Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

Commonly used teaching techniques in science classes may limit the chance to develop students’ critical and logical thinking skills. During this session, explore a unique and interactive questioning technique that enables students to learn the critical thinking process. Students trained by this technique have shown increases in Bloom’s Taxonomy “applying level” questions by 16 percent. Experience the interactive questioning technique and discuss the hypothesis behind the process and the data obtained afterward.

Daiju Hoshino, Instructor, Tarrant County College District

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 2, 6th Floor

Mathematics professional development can be difficult to construct, so a study was conducted comparing a hands-on professional development approach versus traditional professional development approaches. Surprising results occurred when teachers were candid about their feelings on the discussion-based questions and the geometric and statistical concepts available. Participants discuss the study’s five “lessons” for teacher development in the form of hands-on activities, its findings, and topics.

Zachariah Hurdle, Assistant Professor, Southern Arkansas University

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 2, 6th Floor

As professionals from industry, clinical instructors and preceptors do not always possess the necessary skills to work with students. How do we close the gaps in consistency between clinical facilities and instructors while also building clinical instructors’ confidence to work with our students? Spend some time stealing great ideas from each other so we can give our students the best possible learning experience in the clinical setting. Discussion also includes best practices to onboard students at the facility, help them demonstrate technical skills, and for evaluating student aptitude.

Jeanne Dial, Program Director, GateWay Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor

Onboarding curriculum training is designed to reduce the number of new teachers leaving urban private schools after one year. Participants discuss strategies within the curriculum training manual and how they help retain new teachers who may not have learned formal pedagogy from teacher education programs.

Darrell Lewis, Educator, Principal, First Dimensions Three Educational Group, Inc. and Dimensions 3 Academy; Josetta Arnold, Educator, Edward Waters College; Felicia Wider Lewis, Faculty, First Dimensions Three Educational Group, Inc. and Dimensions 3 Academy

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

With the passage of House Bill 2223, Texas colleges must now implement corequisite remediation, a model that places students in entry-level college courses paired to developmental support courses. Participants examine how different Texas colleges have responded to HB 2223 in terms of ESL instruction. The discussion focuses on ways ESL programs can adjust their curriculum to meet standards of this new model and strategies to prepare ESL students for academic coursework.

Geneva Tesh, Professor, Houston Community College

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 2, 6th Floor

This presentation promotes awareness of the trouble areas for technical education and how to repair a broken, yet fixable, technical career path for aspiring tradesmen and women that many of us may one day employ.

Kenneth Williams, Professor and Lead Instructor, Delgado Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

Students, educators, and the community you live in all benefit from service learning. Come contribute to a conversation about service learning and how it differs from volunteering. Share your experiences with service learning and how you, your students, your college, and community have benefitted. The discussion concentrates on ways to foster a culture of support, community, and positive interaction between students, faculty, and community partners and the mutual benefits of service learning.

Aimee Kelly, Galleries Curator and Art Instructor, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

Professors, especially adjuncts, often bring a myriad of real-world experiences to the classroom. Those experiences and opportunities can provide deeper dives and examples that aid in achieving student learning objectives and outcomes. Learn details about creating curriculum that can keep students engaged in the classroom, share accounts of real-world experiences, and discuss ways to incorporate personal experience into courses.

Kimberly O'Neil, Professor, Collin College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 2, 6th Floor

Have you ever avoided discussing controversial issues in the classroom? Instructors frequently avoid such discussions due to concerns about the unpredictability of student reactions, accusations of trying to push a political agenda, and insufficient knowledge or skills to work through complex issues. However, class discussions and debate have been shown to have a direct and positive impact on students’ critical thinking skills and democratic commitments. Learn how to gracefully discuss controversial issues during this session.

Leonard Winogora, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, Mercer County Community College and William Paterson University at Mercer

Takes place on Monday, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

Hear about one professor’s journey into the prison classroom and listen to ex-offenders’ recorded words about their experiences. Participants learn about the role of social supports in the completion of previously incarcerated students based on current research and are led through activities geared toward producing empathy in order to identify with ex-felons. Participants share ideas to boost college completion and the community workforce by supporting ex-offenders.

Heidi Arnold, Professor, Sinclair Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

Lone Star College Kingwood and the Kingwood community were profoundly affected by severe flooding during Hurricane Harvey. Six of nine LSC-Kingwood buildings and over 5,000 homes in its service area flooded. Learn how one artist used music and personalized video stories during concerts to move affected citizens from despair to hope, and discuss creative ways to use art in trying times.

Todd Miller, Professor and Chair, Visual and Performing Arts, Lone Star College – Kingwood

Takes place on Tuesday, 8 – 9 a.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

Students and families must be aware of the importance of saving early for retirement and choosing the right investment products. The presenter explains the difference between active and passive mutual fund investing and why active investing can be the wrong choice. Also discussed is selecting mutual funds for long-term growth, establishing an investment brokerage account with low to no fees attached, and analyzing how dollar cost averaging can be a reasonable approach to retirement planning.

Marc Lafond, Professor, Buisness, Arizona Western College

Takes place on Monday, 9:45 – 10:45 a.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

The session shares the findings of using the Accelerated Learning Program of a corequisite developmental English course with the college-level composition course at Butler Community College. Using collected data and interviews of students, the results offer an analytical overview of student success and failure factors. Participants discuss these factors and how to increase success rates for developmental education and degree completion.

Noreen Templin, Professor, Butler Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

Butler Community College recently committed to the goal that no student should go through the institution without at least one person knowing who that student is, what their goals are, and their particular educational needs. After one year of implementation of a systemic mentoring program, Butler Community College recounts data that suggest where the program was successful and where improvement are needed. Through anecdotal and statistical analysis, the presenters provide suggestions, answer questions, and share ideas for implementing structured mentoring practices into curriculum and program design.

Donnie Featherston, Professor, Butler Community College; Cory Teubner, Professor, Butler Community College

Takes place on Sunday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

Join this Roundtable Discussion to look at the eight Dimensions of Wellness and how they can be used to develop holistic strategies and collaborative models for student success. Gain new insight and further the dialogue pertaining to student wellness, well-being and thriving. We also examine the challenges developing metrics that can be used to support data-informed decision-making around this trending topic.

Michele Richardson, Program Director, Prince George's Community College

Takes place on Tuesday, 9:15 – 10:15 a.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

This session explores several apps that can be used to enhance online physical education curriculum. Participants discuss using learning management systems (LMS), videos, file sharing, and GPS to assess course objectives, skill acquisition, address academic honesty, engage students in active learning, and promote student-directed exercise progression in the online learning environment. Participants who download the GPS and LMS apps have the opportunity to participate in a simulated student experience.

Cindy Kelley, Assistant Professor, Harford Community College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 2, 6th Floor

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 2, 6th Floor

Peer evaluations in the classroom can facilitate student involvement and increase learning. Learn how students evaluating their peers through direct assignment or indirect methods, such as rubrics, can be used in your classroom. Participants discuss the software and processes to obtain peer evaluations and their impact on instructor evaluations.

Jan Zantinga, Lecturer, The University of Georgia – Athens

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, 6th Floor

Learn how change can begin by restructuring teacher education pedagogy to embrace diversity and prepare scholars and practitioners to be culturally responsive. The presenter shares real life-experiences about the lives of people from various groups to offer insight into not succumbing to the vicious cycle that affects many of our nation’s men and women. Educators develop strategies to prepare and create a respectful and inclusive classroom environment, and recognize and confront racial insensitivities.

Victor Woods, CEO, Success International Incorporated

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 2, 6th Floor

Many people work full time and teach college classes on the side. How do we maintain balance and still have a life outside of the institution? During this Roundtable Discussion, discuss how to balance work, teaching, and life to create a better college and better prepared students.

Lee Raubolt, Assistant Director, Truckee Meadows Community College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 4, Table 1, 6th Floor

Although their missions are different, there are several lessons that community colleges can learn about faculty development from for-profit online universities. The nimbleness for change of the for-profit business model provides benefits for talent recognition and leadership pipelines, diversity training, and cross-silo communication within institutions. By discussing various scenarios, participants learn faculty development and support strategies at for-profits that can be leveraged for community college use while preserving community colleges’ unique missions and goals.

Kathryn Miller, Faculty, San Antonio College

Takes place on Sunday, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

Many issues are rising as education becomes more entangled in the activities of our current government. Join your colleagues for a non-political discussion of current issues, based on recent research, and how we can help our students succeed in the current moment.

Kathrynn Hollis-Buchanan, Associate Professor, Kodiak College

Takes place on Monday, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Roundtable Area 2, Table 1, 6th Floor

Research in higher education has done little to explore how social and affective factors influence effective subcultures. This session explores factors present among academic leaders, including leadership perceptions, effective subcultures, the ten dimensions of learner-oriented culture, and the impact effective subcultures have on academic leaders. Participants explore their current institutional landscape and examine the presence of isomorphic subcultures and their impact on the macroculture of an institution.

Jonathan Lord, Associate Dean, College of Southern Idaho

Takes place on Monday, 2:45 – 3:45 p.m., Roundtable Area 1, Table 1, 6th Floor

When inviting students to explore the roots of our country’s divided political and social landscape, it helps to have a language with which to debate our differences. This session focuses on designing classroom projects around folkloric principles that help students develop critical thinking skills, respect for diversity, and a sense of pride in their own unique identity. Learn how storytelling, ethnography, oral histories, and roleplay invite students to engage in difficult conversations about our most divisive conflicts and recognize they often stem from competing value systems and deeply embedded ideas about how the world is or ought to be.

Sara Bell, Instructor, Humanities, Vance-Granville Community College

Takes place on Monday, 4 – 5 p.m., Roundtable Area 3, Table 1, 6th Floor